Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Unread 05-25-2008, 02:53 PM   #16
Plainrider
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 331
I also am planning to attach a solid-surface seat to a Kerdi-covered base and also to attach a solid-surface "ledge" to a shower half-wall (also onto to Kerdi) to which thick shower glass will be placed on top.

I feel that the two main considerations here are: 1) the thermal expansion/contraction of solid-surface material vis a vis the thermal expansion/contraction of porcelain tile (which might indicate the use of silicone adhesive for the solid-surface seat, which has some "give' to it); and 2) the resting of shower glass onto the top of my solid surface 'ledge' (which would indicate the use on 'non-giving' thinset to attach the solid-surface to the Kerdi, so that the glass is adequately supported).

Perhaps, different situations require different adhesives to attach solid-surface to kerdi?
Regards,
__________________
Michael
Plainrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-25-2008, 05:08 PM   #17
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 33,207
Hey Art, one thing you'll learn if you hang around here long enough is that sometimes there are more than one way to do things. Everyone has their opinion, nothing wrong with that. We try to run a friendly forum here without being rude, help us keep it that way.

Trevor, I think you're doing fine.
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-25-2008, 06:35 PM   #18
kerdibird
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 325
I was just kiddin man
It's a free country.
Advice is free, it's what we do with it that counts.
kerdibird is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-25-2008, 07:54 PM   #19
gueuzeman
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Albany, NY
Posts: 8,612
I was guessinfg that kerdibird was just a bit rambunctious and confrontational his morning. But I don't know, it's never happened to me, lol.


gueuze
gueuzeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-25-2008, 08:08 PM   #20
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 33,207
Well, no me either.
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-26-2008, 04:27 AM   #21
kerdibird
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 325
Hey man when you run out of coffee....
kerdibird is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-26-2008, 06:39 AM   #22
kdzgon
Official CPA -- JB Forums
 
kdzgon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: NJ
Posts: 779
I have a full (light colored) Corian shower and a Corian bath ledge in a different bathroom - problem with Corian is whatever is behind the Corian can show through. I used clear silicone to install even though the supplier sold me color matched silicone as I was afraid of the "white undies under white pants" effect (and don't you males try to tell me you don't understand that analogy....).

I was unsure how to attach the soap and shampoo shelves - instructions said silicone, so that's what I did. Seven yrs later, they are still on super-solid despite daily use. Bottom line (IMHO) is silicone is recommended, and it does the job - I'd think it falls under the "if it ain't broke" philosophy, no?

Laurie
kdzgon is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-26-2008, 07:04 AM   #23
pitterpat
Bathroom Remodels and Schluterville Grad
 
pitterpat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 2,242
What is the most important is what the manufacturer says. These solid surface manf. have their own set of rules of how to install their stuff and if you don't do it that way then it voids the warranty!!! So for Corian, and all the other solid surfaces follow the manf's instructions.
__________________
Pat Harris
PAMM Enterprises
"Why call a handyman when you can call A HandyWOMAN?
pitterpat is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-26-2008, 07:45 AM   #24
John Bridge
Mudmeister
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Rosanky, Texas
Posts: 68,261
Send a message via AIM to John Bridge
Hey Laurie, Don't be a stranger. How are all the girls and their husbands?

(Laurie has daughters and sons-in-law in the armed forces.)
John Bridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-26-2008, 08:21 AM   #25
Plainrider
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 331
I understand the "follow the manufacturer's instructions" approach regarding the adhering of Corian to a sub-surface (i.e. using silicone) - when the manufacturer has specified the subsurface.
Generally, I would expect that solid-surface (Corian) shower surfaces would not be anticipated by the manufacturer to be attached to Kerdi - which presents entirely different adhesion characteristics than, say, sheet rock or CBU (which would be the conventional shower subsurface material for Corian).
Now, it would indeed be very helpful if anyone on this forum does have information from a solid-surface manufacturer or from Schluter (especially) that explicitly addresses the attachment of solid-surface material to Kerdi.
(Nevertheless, silicone may be a good adhesive for the attachment of solid-surface to Kerdi...).
I did an experiment with the attachment of solid-surface material to Kerdi using modified thinset - it seemed to develop a very tight, strong, solid bond.
Thinset, afterall, is recommended by Schluter as a good adhesive for Kerdi - but (of course), this is with respect to tiles (not necessarily solid surface). So, following the manufacturer's recommendation depends on which manufacturer you focus on.
For a shower seat made from solid-surface material, the use of a broadly spread thinset base would seem to be much better than silicone precisely for the same reason that thinset would be good for a tiled seat. That is, you don't want the seat to flex when you sit on it... For the attachment of solid surface materials to the shower walls, however, the use of a 'flexible' adhesive may be best to accommodate thermal expansion differences between the soild-surface and the sub-surface - an issue especially with large sheets of solid-surface.
__________________
Michael
Plainrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-26-2008, 08:31 AM   #26
John Bridge
Mudmeister
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Rosanky, Texas
Posts: 68,261
Send a message via AIM to John Bridge
I have never attached Corian to anything with anything. The problem, though, is using the type of thin set Schluter specs for Kerdi -- un-modified "dry-set" mortar. It may or may not remain bonded to the Corian after curing. I know that silicone will. I'm not saying this is the case, but perhaps a hybrid installation would be best -- bedding the Corian in dry-set mortar and then using silicone at the edge seams. It seems to me that if the dry-set de-bonded after a period of time it wouldn't matter so long as the silicone remained in good repair.

But as Davy says, we're all offering our opinions. Sometimes we're right; sometimes we're wrong, as this is an area in which none of us seems to have a lot of experience.
John Bridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-26-2008, 10:46 AM   #27
freiamaya
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 14
Hi!
NOT an expert, so take this for what it is worth.
I was going to put in two Corian bench seats in my steam shower, which will be used mostly as a shower.
I contacted the Corian manufacturer directly at their Customer Care line, and they said that Corain is not suitable for inside of showers, steam or otherwise, and will not be warrantied as a result.
That, coupled with the problem of resins setting to Kerdi, made me go with granite.
You might want to give Dupont customer care at 1-800-906-7765 to see first if Corian is compatible with an interior shower use.
Just a thought!
Maya
freiamaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-26-2008, 11:05 AM   #28
Plainrider
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 331
As per the attached image, Dupont markets Corian precisely for showers. IIRC, Dupont (and other companies) market walls, shower receptors and various other Corian shower items, (spoap dishes, etc).
Now, Corian (and similar solid-surface materials) have an extremely-low water absorption rate - this factor would support their use for kitchen counters, sinks, showers, etc.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Michael
Plainrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-26-2008, 12:06 PM   #29
jay f
Illinois Flooring Man
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: morris il
Posts: 1,147
Send a message via Yahoo to jay f
Every time I have installed a light corian bench, I've used a skimcoat of white thinset underneath the corian, allowed it to dry, then siliconed it down. Don't want the substrate to discolor the corian. It's always worked, that's with an inspection at 1 and 2 years later.
__________________
Jay

give me thin set or give me death!!!
jay f is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-26-2008, 01:56 PM   #30
freiamaya
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 14
Hmmm!
Wish I'd gone with Corian... I HATE living in a small market area, where no-one has even used mortar or thinset...all the granite guys within 3 hours only use glue. Some have never mixed mortar in their lives...Sigh
freiamaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com   National Gypsum Permabase


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:56 PM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2018 John Bridge & Associates, LLC