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Old 08-13-2008, 08:42 AM   #1
iagaoe
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Moving shower drain and toilet drain ques?

New to posting but have been reading a bunch latley.
Looking to remodel my master bath and it is currently set up:
Shower and toilet next to each other closed in with a door....then a vanity with sink, and then a closet.

I want to expand the shower, and move the toilet to the opposite side where the closet is. Kind of hard to explain without pictures but will post some shortly.

Now i guess the question is....how hard is it to move a toilet drain say 5-6 feet and move the shower drain say 6 inches? This is all in a 1 story house with a concrete slab foundation.

If this was to far over my head, what do you think something like that would cost if someone else did it?
Thanks
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Old 08-13-2008, 08:58 AM   #2
ddmoit
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Welcome to the forum, Iagaoe. Is that what we should call you?

Moving your shower drain a few inches is not that big of a deal.

I'm no plumber, mind you, but moving the toilet might be more involved. Two issues come to mind. One, you don't want your toilet to be too far from the vent. I'm not sure how far too far is. The other thing is that I wouldn't want too much of a horizontal run. It would have to be properly sloped, and you would have to have enough depth to properly slope it. Stay tuned for folks more knowledgeable than I.
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Old 08-13-2008, 09:21 AM   #3
iagaoe
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You can call me what ever you like, that name is just an old one i use for stuff....just kind of stuck. BUt my first name is Brian.

I apprecaite the reply and look forward to more information. So i need to know how far from the vent, and proper sloping. thanks.

I figure the most work would be busting up the concrete?

Last edited by iagaoe; 08-13-2008 at 09:45 AM.
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Old 08-13-2008, 11:50 AM   #4
Matt Clark
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Thumbs up

IF you figure out the max distance you can move it, then actually the move itself is not that big of a deal...it's just grunt work and takes time.

I used a 4.5" angle grinder with diamond wheel ($10 at Lowes) to cut a groove about 1/2" deep, outlining the area I needed to cut out. Then used a demo hammer (oversized hammer drill) with a chisel attachement ($15/day - took one day) to bust out the concrete.

Go a bit over wide (I cut out an 8" wide channel for 4" pipe) so that you have some room to work. Dig a trench in the backfill and lay the pipe. Be sure to pack the fill back in under the slab (I just used a maul as a packing device) to avoid any settling and mix up some Sakrete to fill in the cutout. 3 inches of Sakrete is plenty...

Same process for shower drain. Just be sure for both that you have an idea of WHERE your sewer line comes in from and exactly where you want it to end up.

For both, you can stub out pipe, and put a cardboard sleeve in while you pour your concrete...that lets you fine tune the height of the finished drains when you're absolutely certain of finished floor height...

Here's a couple pics of my (messy) project when I realized that neither the shower nor vanity drains were exactly where I wanted...and had to add vents to both, inside the closet walls...





I've no photos of the WC drain move, but it's the same process...don't worry about getting the surface glass smooth, assuming you're tiling over it, it won't matter anyway.
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:06 PM   #5
iagaoe
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Thanks for the pics...

"Same process for shower drain. Just be sure for both that you have an idea of WHERE your sewer line comes in from and exactly where you want it to end up."

I will not know this until i start demo correct? Or is it where the toilet is now? and i would just extend from where it currently is...

I appreciate all the help as i am clueless to all of this. The way you put it doesn't sound to bad....definetly do able.
Thanks
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:13 PM   #6
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Definitely do-able...

It's not critical to know where it is currently, as you'll figure that out when you cut up the floor at the existing drain. Just helps to know this so you know how much material you'll need. In addition, if you're "shortening" the drain run, and not extending, it won't affect the vent, unless you're moving it to a spot closer to the house exit than the vent is...would need to tie that in somehow. Might just mean extra concrete needs bustin'...

If it's possible (worked in my case) talk to a plumber...mine offered to do the whole job, provide guidance and then inspect what I did or about anything in between. He's the one that suggested I put in the "sleeve" to allow for final adjustment, and it was a great suggestion.

I think I gave him about $100, plus coffee and donuts...but it was worth the piece of mind. I'd not done much under-slab work before and he gave lots of guidance.
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:20 PM   #7
iagaoe
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I might have to find one just to pick their brain.

Last question....a vent, i'm not understanding what it is and where it would be currently located? Is that the tube that comes out the roof over my bathroom? If thats the case what is in store on moving the vent, is it neccesary to move if the toilet is moved say 5-6 feet. Again, how would i determine where mine is currently?
Thanks again!
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:24 PM   #8
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Question That one I can't answer from here...

That's what I was getting at with the point about "knowing where pipes come from". If you knew in which direction your drains flowed, you'd have at least a pretty good idea if you were shortening the run or increasing it...you may have to have a plumber at least check out your situation. He or she can obviously see what's what.

The vent goes out through the roof somewhere...it allows sewer gas to escape without pushing it up through your traps and your drains to drain without sucking these same traps dry...probably runs up inside a wall somewhere from beneath the slap, where it's plumbed in to the drain lines.
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:35 PM   #9
iagaoe
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so with me increasing the run i will more than likely have to move the vents?

I'll take a couple pictures that shows the lay out, i know it won't make a big difference in anything, but it will atleast give perspective.
Thanks,
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:40 PM   #10
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Not necessarily...

...if you add a couple feet (5 or 6???) to your plumbing run, will it not drain? Gravity still works...but you might get gurgling or ???

But only someone familiar with your situation, and local codes can really tell you...just saying, it might not hurt to ask someone local. You'll need to buy some stuff...drains, fittings, pipe, etc. Why not just ask the vendor? (GAWD forbid, it's Home Despot, or Lowe's!) My local Plumb Supply is always happy to answer most of my Q's. I just "bow to their superior knowledge", suck it up and ask.

Show some pics...
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:44 PM   #11
iagaoe
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Much easier to ask here because you can not see my dumbfounded look as i ask my questions and think about it. ha!

Ya pictures are hideous....bathroom is a true 80's bath, pink tiles and all. Will do shortly though, thanks for all the replies.
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:48 PM   #12
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Don't matter what it looks like now...

it's what it's GONNA look like when you're done.

Believe me, I know it's easier to ask "dumb" Q's on a forum than in person. I've given up sometimes, though and go directly to the experts and start with something like..."I've been told you REALLY know your stuff...and I don't...can I ask you something?"

Until you've asked the Q and know the correct A, it's not really all that dumb...just unknown.
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