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Unread 01-13-2008, 09:09 PM   #1
ddmoit
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Gas Water Heater

OK, I can't find a way to tie this subject to tile, so I'm posting in the Mud Box.

I suddenly need a new water heater. I think the dip tube in my 22-year-old Ruud brand has bit the dust. I've been looking for an excuse to replace this 40-gallon-leak-waiting-to-happen, and now I have one.

Any thoughts on a decent brand? I know to avoid Whirlpool.

Any thoughts on 40 gallons vs. 40 50 gallons? I'm leaning towards another 40 because it's always seemed to be enough, and I anticipate the hot water usage in my home to trend downward in the next 5 to 10 years. Unless there is no added cost, or some kind of savings, I don't see how a 50 makes sense.

I could post this on Terry Love's forum (I might anyway), but I like to stick with the devil I know.
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Last edited by ddmoit; 01-14-2008 at 08:53 AM. Reason: fixed typo
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Unread 01-13-2008, 09:34 PM   #2
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Howdy Dan,
First Devil reporting..
AO Smith makes a lot of the heaters out there.Their Conservationist and Maytag's Series 12 are good ones..
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Unread 01-13-2008, 10:03 PM   #3
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Thanks for weighing in, Frank!
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Unread 01-13-2008, 10:12 PM   #4
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Given your intro, I probably shouldn't point out that dip tubes are cheap and easy to replace, should I?
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Unread 01-13-2008, 10:16 PM   #5
ddmoit
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Thanks, Eric. If this thing wasn't 22 years old, I would do that. I'm convinced that this dip tube failure is going to save me from a total failure that could happen any day now.
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Unread 01-14-2008, 07:52 AM   #6
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Anyone have an opinion on the Lochinvar brand?
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Unread 01-14-2008, 08:20 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddmoit
Any thoughts on 40 gallons vs. 40 gallons?
Well, if you're gonna start with trick questions, I'm gonna hafta think up a trick answer, eh?

I've been installing RUUD HVAC systems for my customers for years, but didn't even know they made water heaters.

I've been a user of State brand water heaters, both gas and electric, for twenty-odd years. Can't say they're better than nor worse than other brands, but I've had very good luck with them. My earliest plumber dealt that brand when I started building down here so that's what we used. Still deal with same plumber, so still use'em.

I'm not familiar with your Lochinvar brand at all.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 01-14-2008, 08:39 AM   #8
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For my other home I use a direct vent natural gas fired Bradford White 48 gallon. It is in a corner over the french drain with a swale formed in the concrete floor to it's own dedicated 30 gallon crock w/ a 110v & 12v back up.

Installed 4/94, new $6.00 dip tube installed 6/04.

Can run clothes washer, dishwasher, showers & wash cars & boat. Never ran out of hot water.

Will be installing the same in my new (old) home.

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Unread 01-14-2008, 08:50 AM   #9
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AO makes State too..
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Unread 01-14-2008, 08:52 AM   #10
ddmoit
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Quote:
...40 gallons vs. 40 gallons?


That would be 40 vs. 50. Sometimes spell check just isn't enough.
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Unread 01-14-2008, 09:14 AM   #11
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I'd vote for the 50.. Ya just can never have too much hot water.. especially when your washin clothes, runnin the dishwasher, and havin guests over.
Ya just don't never want to run out...
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Unread 01-14-2008, 09:26 AM   #12
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Frank, you're all too comfortable in your demonic role.

I think I'm gonna stick with 40 gallons. I really can't recall a time when that seemed inadequate. Our washing machine is a Whirlpool Duet front-loader that hardly uses any water. Additionally, the headcount in my house will be going down in the next decade (oldest of two is a high school sophomore). If it doesn't, I'll have more to worry about than just a water heater.

I'd definitely go with 50 on someone else's dime though.
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Unread 01-14-2008, 10:13 AM   #13
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Hey Dan,
You could go with the Rinnai that Rush is peddlin right now..
I have a 50 that is around 10 years old and was considering some changes. I have a problem waiting for hot water (impatient), so I was gonna put either a recirculating system on the hot side or use a waterless heater to help better distribute the hot water to the baths and washers. There are also valves that you put on the highest valve in the system that dumps the water and keeps the water hot.
Keep us posted on your research..
and yeah, I am comfortable with the 's role...
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Unread 01-14-2008, 10:33 AM   #14
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Curious... Why wouldn't you go tankless? It's much MUCH more efficient and you get hug tax break and usually will get government funded rebate checks that ammount to cash. www.energystar.gov

So, end up spending about the same up front, save every month for the rest of it's life, save a TON of space where your old tanker was sitting.
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Unread 01-14-2008, 12:17 PM   #15
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The new tank is on line as I type this.

I hear ya on the recirculating system, Frank. I would do that in new construction.

Chad, I've looked at tankless before. It doesn't make sense for me. First, I have plenty of room in my utility area. The boiler that heats the house is tiny, and a 40 gal. tank has a small footprint too.

It's my understanding that those tankless models need really good (not hard) water to operate efficiently. I'm on a well (by choice). Even if I brought in municipal water, I would probably still have to run a softener for a tankless to work. That's my impression, anyway.
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