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Unread 06-06-2020, 10:58 AM   #16
cx
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Sounds like you're gonna end up better informed than most of us who have installed such roofing, Wolfgang. That, of course, is a good thing, but it may limit your ability to select a roofer you're comfortable with.

It will certainly be helpful if you can list precisely what you want when comparing prices, but, as in all things construction, beware the low bidder. There are still corners that can be cut even when the bids might appear to be for the same product and service. But I expect you know that.
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Unread 06-08-2020, 04:29 PM   #17
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I am pursuing a new approach. I identified a supplier in the Dallas area (Sheffield Metals) that has the materials I want. I will ask them for local installers that use their products. Maybe that way I could get an installer who's familiar with what I want. I've been watching their youtube channel, and they've put some amazingly useful information out. I feel drawn to their business model of information and product presentation.

And yes, CX, knowledge is a curse. Got my first bid. Price was as expected (close to $30k). That really isn't the problem. However, the actual bid was five lines and the price. No mention of the base material (Galvalume) nor even the permit responsibility. They mentioned "synthetic roofing felt" as underlayment which had me confused (either it's synthetic or it's felt, right? It can't be both, or can it?) I had asked for PVDF coating but got a quote for SMP which I told them I didn't want. No itemization of labor vs. material nor the size of the roof to be covered. Zilch. Maybe that's a common thing for roofing proposals? I don't want to go with a company that doesn't put a modicum of effort into its proposals. Not for that kind of money.

In terms of underlayment, it seems to me I should get something whose warranty matches the longevity of the roof proper? Or would you say that the old-fashioned roofing felt is sufficient? It's cheaper but heavier. It seems that Sharkskin products are mentioned in some quality installs I have encountered in my research. Their advanced product carries a 50 year warranty. Plus, they offer a compatible peel and stick membrane for sensitive areas.
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Unread 06-15-2020, 10:48 AM   #18
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Must be a busy time for roofers. Of all the eight contractors I called I only ever got one response followed by an actual quote. Not sure what to think but I wonder if this is common?

Unfortunately, the only contractor who got back to me with a quote wants to install Owens Corning ProArmor as an underlayment. I checked into it, and the installation instructions say this is only for shingle roofs. I emailed Owens Corning customer support, and they told me to absolutely NOT use this under a metal roof. Sure, I could talk the contractor into changing the underlayment to something appropriate but I am not motivated to do so. Not particularly encouraging to know that they chose the wrong product at this stage.
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Unread 09-30-2020, 02:26 PM   #19
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I am all excited. My install will begin in two weeks. Kynar finish galvalum. All as desired. Out of numerous companies, they were the ONLY one that followed through. Not that I have much of a choice.

I was provided the name of my specific installer today. I usually just briefly check public court records of people who work on my house. I wished I hadn't....
The installer has numerous alcohol-related offenses on his record. Multiple DUIs, driving with license suspended, open alcohol container, possession of marijuana etc. It's a long list. However, for the past ten years there has been nothing on his record. So, either he's drinking without causing trouble or he's detoxed for good. I don't know.

I have trust in the company and the person I've been dealing with so far. They've been reliably communicating everything, brought me samples, gave me addresses to look at their previous work. There are no negative reviews about them floating online. I think from my research that they are a reputable company.

What do you guys recommend? I think I should have at least an open conversation about this with the company's owner who's been very accessible so far. I don't want to discriminate against someone who's had trouble in the past and who is now doing ok. At the same time, I really have a concern after looking at the installer's criminal record. Alcoholism is a terrible condition, so if this man overcame it, then this is an accomplishment. However, if not, I don't want to suffer the consequences which possibly include sloppy work.
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Unread 09-30-2020, 03:00 PM   #20
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I don't think you'd be at all out of line asking the owner what he knows about the fellow's past and recent activities that might weigh upon your decision to have him work in/on your house, Wolfgang.
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Unread 10-23-2020, 08:17 PM   #21
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The project has started. The installer is very good and approachable. We work out flashing details and placement of penetrations together. So far, I am very pleased. It's a slow process, though. 14 installation days. The weather right now doesn't help, so patience is of the essence. But it's already starting to look very nice.
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Unread 10-23-2020, 08:29 PM   #22
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Well, at least it's not too hot to touch the metal without gloves, Wolfgang. Glad you found you a competent contractor with whom you have a good rapport. Not all that common these days.
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Unread 10-23-2020, 10:05 PM   #23
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The metal is the whitest white available in Kynar. Never gets hot (which is the purpose of this whole thing). Come next spring, I'll start enjoying that benefit.
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Unread 10-24-2020, 09:40 AM   #24
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You keep a piece of that roofing and leave it outside come August and tell me again how it doesn't get hot, Wolfgang.
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Unread 10-28-2020, 01:24 PM   #25
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Simple physics, CX. I've measured the difference myself when I had painted my shingle roof with some hydrated lime. I used an infrared thermometer. Ambient was in the high 90s on a sunny summer day (can't remember the month). The painted shingles were approx. 5-10 degs. above ambient, the unpainted gray shingles were a whopping 160 deg. F.
The metal's reflectance and albedo are similar to my experiment, just the material is more durable and also has less mass. For maximum effect, the roof has to be as white as possible. A light grey, for instance, will already get somewhat hot.

The difference is between dark and white roofs is dramatic. When the pandemic is over, I'll have to invite you to an attic tour.

Only downside is that in the winter you lose a little of that heat gain through the roof. In cold climates, white roofs are certainly a less than perfect choice.
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