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Unread 02-12-2015, 10:39 AM   #16
Teri-Lee
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It probably was building paper or roofing felt then. That explains it. Thanks!
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Unread 02-12-2015, 12:28 PM   #17
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Thank you for accolades, Teri-Lee!

I realize that Ditra-Heat is probably one of the more expensive warming wire solutions out there but it is dirt simple to use and install and making adjustments is a breeze with it. You do pay for that convenience, however!
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Unread 02-12-2015, 05:03 PM   #18
Splinter
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I dont know why you wont stick with the original plan of hydronic heat in your floor. It's much more energy efficient than electric and likely a cheaper install as well.

3/8" pex looped in a 1 1/2" mud bed with Ditra on top would still be under your 2" limit. There's a bazillion mud floors set over a plank subfloor out there that have lasted decades.
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Unread 02-12-2015, 08:02 PM   #19
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Funny you should say that. My husband is still lobbying for hydronics. I just want to make sure we can open doors and not have cracked tiles!
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Unread 02-12-2015, 08:05 PM   #20
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I was just going back to CX's post that "Your plan to put hydronic tubing covered with SLC is only recognized by industry standards for joist spacing not to exceed 16" on center"

Is there a way around that - or would we be talking about reinforcing joists?
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Unread 02-12-2015, 08:29 PM   #21
Splinter
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Forget the SLC... I was talking about drypack... Sand and portland cement.. Search around this site, you'll find lots of info on it.

I missed the 24" OC spacing though... Wait for one of these guys to give an opinion on mud over that...
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Unread 02-12-2015, 08:38 PM   #22
cx
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Teri-Lee, the joist structure must meet the customary L/360 deflection requirement, but the spacing limitation has to do with the subflooring rather than the joist structure.

The published method requires a single layer of nominal 3/4" plywood for a subfloor over 16" joist centers. It's quite possible that adding a second layer of nominal 5/8ths" or thicker exterior glue plywood subflooring would make it work at 24" spacing, but there's no published method specifying that. Doesn't indicate it wouldn't work, nor that it isn't done, just means no one spent the money required to get it to the level of acceptance by the TCNA Handbook committee. If I wanted to use that method of heating installation for myself, I'd not hesitate to do it over the improved subflooring. I'd be using a membrane on top even if I met the criteria for the published method. See my warranty information below.

What Alex is suggesting would be less expensive, but is also limited to 16" joist spacing and simply filling over the hydronics with deck mud would not meet industry standards, either. You would need to fill to the tops of the tubes with deck mud, then add a cleavage membrane and then a minimum of 1 1/4 inches of deck mud with welded wire reinforcement in the vertical center. By the time you did all that, after installing the necessary layer of subflooring, you'd be getting pretty tall. The SLC would be a good bit lower, requiring plastic lath and a minimum of 1/2" thickness above the hydronics (unless the SLC manufacturer requires more). And a good bit more costly.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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