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Unread 04-18-2020, 08:45 AM   #31
cx
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This is my favorite diamond blade for an angle grinder if you can find one. Will cut those holes wet or dry. Wet is better, of course.

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Unread 04-18-2020, 02:35 PM   #32
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Advice needed for drilling with a small diamond coring bit

Thanks CX for the recommendation on the blade!

I've picked up the small diamond core bit (using 3/8") - it's a Milwaukee bit.

QUESTIONS:
  • I have a continuous stream of water but it's taking me almost 15 minutes to do a single hole in this porcelain (it's nearly 3/8" thick) and of course each outlet needs four holes. Does it sound reasonable that each hole should be taking me 15 minutes?
  • I think what I'm seeing is that it's critical/helpful to invert the tile and get the water and porcelain particles out of the hole because it seems that the small removed particles become a problem down at the bottom of the bore if they are not removed.

Open to any advice you have regarding the right way to do these small holes in the porcelain - this is my first time doing it. Thanks again for all the help.
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Unread 04-18-2020, 03:46 PM   #33
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When I'm drilling holes thru tiles, I drill one thru a piece of wood first, something like a 1x4 that's 8 to 12 inches long, just about any scrap piece works. Then I place that piece on top on the tile and hold it while drilling. Sometimes I'll clamp the wood to the tile and fill the hole with water while drilling. Having a pool of water 3/4 inch deep will keep the bit cool and also hold it in place.
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Unread 04-18-2020, 04:36 PM   #34
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Need to know correct speed for coring bit

I need to know for sure whether to run this tiny diamond core bit at high speed or at low speed. One website I read said to run it at low speed (500rpm specifically); another site said to run it it at high speed (ie ...closer to 3000rpm). I think that the low rpm advice is wrong. I seem to be seeing that when I run it faster at about 1200rpm I think it works well - and takes more than twice as long at 500rpm.

I'm now planning to shift to my higher speed drill which runs at about 2800rpm, if I remember correctly ...to see how that goes.

Would welcome any advice from anyone who knows the answer to this speed question.

(regarding the water: my current setup squirts a continuous stream of water ...most of it going into the hole in the higher end of the coring bit)
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Unread 04-18-2020, 05:37 PM   #35
Tool Guy - Kg
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If this is an electroplated bit, the most important thing to know is that heat is the enemy. If the bit overheats, it will wear down to a useless stub in a big hurry.

500 rpm is a good middle ground for bits that are 1.5" or so. But smaller holesaws will have considerably slower "cutting rim speed". So, you can speed up that little 3/8" bit quite a bit, presuming you've got it being cooled with continuous water. Like Davy said, immersed is best.

As a test with any electroplated bit, drill for just 5 or 10 seconds and pull the bit out of the hole. If it has run dry with water or has gotten too hot to touch it, you're running too fast, with not enough water, or both. While bigger holesaws have significantly faster "cutting rum speed" and can overheat quicly, keep your eyes on any size electroplated holesaw. Electroplated bits succumb quickly to heat. Sintered bits are much, much, much more durable and can typically be run dry.

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Unread 04-18-2020, 09:25 PM   #36
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The Corner Holes

Thanks everyone for all your assistance. It has enabled me to solve the problems I was having and keep this job moving.

FINDINGS:
Speed - Short story: The higher speed is the way to go with this 3/8" Milwaukee diamond coring bit. I start the hole slow with a variable speed drill and using a jig consisting of a metal bar with a 13/32" hole in the end. Then once it's started I remove the jig, put the bit into a high speed drill running at 3000 Rpm (A Phillips Red Head 606 Hammer drill - with the hammer turned off, of course). Drilling this 3/8" thick porcelain the times I've clocked were:

500rpm: 40minutes
1000rpm: 15 minites
3000rpm: 4-6 minutes (not sure where the variation comes from)

What I'm seeing is that the higher the speed, the higher the vibration - but for me, even in this delicate situation, the vibration is still tolerable at 3000 rpm (This phillips Red Head drill is a beauty). I suppose it would also be the case that a 1/4" bit would have less vibration than this 3/8" bit but I haven't tried that ...it's still tolerable. I think some of the vibration comes from the hole saw rubbing against one side of the hole as it goes down into the bore (not sure).

Vibration control: throughout the duration of the cut, the tile itself is sitting on one of those foam cushions that you can buy in a plant nursery intended to cushion your knees when you pull weeds in your garden - seems to work perfectly! (a variation on CX's "scrap of carpet" idea)

Cooling/WaterLube: The water is a continuous stream that comes from my garden hose. The Ryobi Handheld wet Circular Saw comes with a hose connector to squirt water continuously on the circular diamond blade ...so I just disconnected it from the wet saw and used it to squirt water onto this hole saw. (it includes a regulator to reduce the water pressure from the hose pressure to about 5 psi - similar regulator to the ones used for drip irrigation in gardening)

I don't know if the bit I'm using is "electroplated" or not. It is a Milwaukee "Diamond Plus hole saw".
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Unread 04-18-2020, 09:29 PM   #37
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The Straight Cuts

Short explanation: I used a hand grinder with a foot-controlled motor speed control and the above-mentioned water stream for continuous water.

The details: Those variable speed hand grinders are pricey ($150+) and very hard to find in-stock. I already had a Dremel foot-operated motor speed control but it has a power maximum of 5 amps. My handheld circular Wet Saw pulls about 12 amps. So I found a 15amp motor speed control at Harbor freight ...but returned it when I discovered that it had a very small speed range - from about 80% to full speed. But Harbor Freight does have an $18 Angle Grinder - the only one that pulls only 5 amps - so I used that with my foot-operated speed control and one of their $10 diamond blades. It has done the job. I don't like to buy such a cheap tool but I hardly ever have a need for an angle grinder. I'm not sure if it's the $10 blade or the $18 angle grinder that has some vibration, but regardless, I can run it at low enough speed and it delivers one finished outlet hole in about two minutes.

Thanks again everyone for all that enormously helpful advice !!
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Unread 04-18-2020, 09:41 PM   #38
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I looked it up. The Milwaukee Diamond Plus holesaw is an electroplate type. You can tell by the cutting rim looking like it's been glued and dipped in sand.
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The bit only lasts as long as the coating of diamond bits is still present. So it doesn't last very long. Sometimes it will only last for a few holes if it's not cared for. If it's immersed in water and you take it easy, you might get it to last for several dozen holes.




A sintered bit's business end looks much smoother with far fewer exposed diamond bits.
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The diamond bits are within the entire matrix of a relatively thick wear layer. As the diamond and matrix is worn down, new diamond bits are exposed, keeping it sharp and usable for a long time. In the case of this 3/8" bit, the wear layer is about 1/2" deep. So it can last for hundreds of holes. Sometimes sintered have segments, slots, or a turbo style rim. And sometimes on small bits, the core is solid, or partially solid instead of hollow.

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Unread 04-18-2020, 09:50 PM   #39
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Thanks for the info about the Hole Saw, Tool Guy!

What do you recommend I do if I suspect that it has gotten to a point where the cutting edge is "clogged" and there is a need to break into some diamonds deeper down?
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Unread 04-18-2020, 10:08 PM   #40
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Where to find sintered bits?

What kind of local supplier would sell these sintered bits? I live about 25 minutes south of Tacoma Washington. My kitchen is a bit of a mess right now with this job ...otherwise I would order one online.
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Unread 04-18-2020, 10:12 PM   #41
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Whoops....sorry...I was adding a picture to my previous post while you were posting. Take a look at my previous post for a bit more info.

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick_here
What do you recommend I do if I suspect that it has gotten to a point where the cutting edge is "clogged" and there is a need to break into some diamonds deeper down?
With an electroplated bit, there are no more diamond bits below the ones that you can see. What you see is only what you get. If you've run the bit in a way that you haven't flushed all the ground tile particles away, they can become logged between the diamond grit particles. While you can try using a sharp needle or something to try picking it clean, it's pretty tough. Do you have a picture of the tip of your bit? We might be able to tell you if it's worth trying to clean, or if you've bottomed it out and it's done for.

I haven't been to Tacoma, Washington in.....uh.....ever. So, I don't know where you can find them. They are a specialized bit normally only found at specialty tool places...perhaps a tool rental place. And no, not Home Depot Tool Rental. You can find sintered bits on the net. But be wary because plenty of electroplated bits will still pop up during your search.

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Unread 04-18-2020, 10:46 PM   #42
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Attached image is best I can get (phones and many small cameras are autofocus)
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Unread 04-18-2020, 11:20 PM   #43
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Sorry, a little too blurry. If you hold the bit between your fingers (sort of like someone would hold a cigarette) so the business end is flush with your fingers, you might be able to take a photo without the auto-focus being fooled.

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Unread 04-18-2020, 11:27 PM   #44
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Perhaps somewhat better?
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Unread 04-18-2020, 11:39 PM   #45
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Oh, yeah. Good picture. Thanks.

The bit still appears visually good. If you had shiny metal spots, that would be the underlying metal being exposed...meaning that you're done for. But the grit still appears okay. But I don't see a lot of tile particles in there. I don't think taking a needle (like on a push pin or a scrap sewing needle) will do much for you. Is the bit slowing down in its grinding speed a little or a lot?

I researched and found a drill bit wholesaler in Tacoma, but they don't have any sintered bits on their website. Sorry.

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