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Unread 09-30-2007, 09:26 PM   #1
duneslider
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Polishing Stone, wet or dry?

I am looking at getting some good polishing equipment. Really, just a good vs grinder with water capability. Looking at a Flex system now but have read a lot about makita's grinder too. I will mostly just be bullnosing stone and polishing edges. I have been reading a lot and some seem to say wet is the way to go and others say dry is the way to go.

1.Does it really matter? Getting the feeling it is a preference.

2.Do certain things require one or the other?

Any other advice is welcomed.

Bryan
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Unread 09-30-2007, 10:53 PM   #2
Deane100
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If you get a wet polisher you can always use it dry. I've been playing with concrete lately, use the tool wet up to 2000 grit then finish polishing dry. I bought a Makita...Been happy with it except it didn't come with the adapter/fitting to hook it up to a hose. Couldn't believe it...bought the tool for close to 300 duckets- then had to go to HD to buy a $1.20 part to get it to work.
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Unread 10-01-2007, 12:13 AM   #3
belletile
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Bryan
I've got a flex and it works great. I need rain gear to use it wet but it seems to be a real work horse piece of equipment. I see them for well under 300 now.
Aside from the water splash I sure find wet easier. No dust to breathe, better quicker finish and I think it is easier on the diamond bits - or less expensive in the long run. I did dry for a long time and it always seemed a pain. I think everybody has tried to jury rig a cheap grinder and a hose to drip on the work at one time or another. It is nice to have the proper water feed and the correct rpm. Almost feel like a professional! The flex even has the ground fault built on the cord, not sure about the Makita - eliminates all those irritating little shocks.
We use ours for bull nosing about 90% of the time.
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Unread 10-01-2007, 06:07 AM   #4
MHI
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I've got an Alpha, and I use their ceramic pads. The water is more for the pads than to keep dust down.

Its a trade off, one way you breath dust, the other you get wet. Either one makes just as much mess.
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Unread 10-01-2007, 06:58 AM   #5
MICK1
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I wouldget a variable speed polisher,forpolishing the edges of marble and onyx
I woulduse the velcro back padsfrom alpha wet/dry , i would do the polishing
wet untill the 400 grit, then using the 600 I would run those dry to achieve the luster desired,I think those come in packages of 50 assorted and for small jobs andon site they are ideal, after the 600 you may want to buff it with a felt pads from alpha (4") with some alluminun oxide the bars comes in different colors dependon the color of the marble that should you be able to achieve a very good polishing.

thanks,

Mick
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Unread 10-01-2007, 02:02 PM   #6
duneslider
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I have found a pretty good price on a flex system and think I will give it a go. It is sounding like I should probably get a set of dry and wet pads. I don't think I will do a lot of polishing. Right now most stone is trav, limestone, and slate. Every now and then I do a little granite. I really just want to have what I need available when the times come up.

Thanks for the advice,

Bryan
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Unread 10-01-2007, 03:25 PM   #7
Davestone
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Dry is handy for some jobs,and i have a few wet polishers, but have never hooked them to water, but doing a bunch of edges you will want to, since the edge won't hold water on it.You want the water to barely trickle out, otherwise you'll be wet and the stone won't, and you'll blow the polishing gel off it.Invest in some 5x polishing powder, or maybe some of MB's stone chemicals.You will want an assortment of backer pads, at least one each of flex, medium, and rigid,velcro,and get some Alpha pads,one dry one wet, be sure the wet one will do granite or marble.Be sure to get a dark buff and light buff pads,for marble and granite.Also you may want to get the gel polishing powder for doing edges like that.And get some hogs hair buffing pads, and cut little 4" circles out to use to polish with for a final polish.Go to NSRAWEB for useful polishing tips.
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Unread 10-03-2007, 09:59 PM   #8
mrtoad
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I use dry pads 90% of the time, but you need to buy pads that are designed to be used dry, otherwise you waste alot of diamond. For dark granites, wet is the only way to go, and quality pads make the difference. I have had good luck with all of alpha' s products, but they tend to be the priciest. Also, when working with really soft material, it's tough to beat good ol sc sandpaper via psa.
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Unread 10-03-2007, 10:08 PM   #9
duneslider
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Man Davestone, got anything else to add to that list? I think I am going to need more than one birthday to fill that list.

I think I will start out with a dry set but with a grinder that can do wet. I really don't do granite and marble much here. I will slowly start building my supply of all that stuff you have listed.

Maybe someday if I have room in my garage I will get me that bulldog.

Bryan
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Unread 10-03-2007, 11:30 PM   #10
JerryL
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I have the Flex water fed polisher. It's a good machine. When I bought it I was told not to run it dry as it would damage the seals and bearings. I noticed some of you are running them dry. Any problems? Has anyone else heard this?

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Unread 10-03-2007, 11:53 PM   #11
duneslider
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I looked up their operating guide and could not see anything that said it had to be used wet only.

Bryan
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