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Unread 08-04-2006, 05:56 PM   #1
jmkeuning
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Silicone or Grout where floor meets base tile. How about top of base tile?

I was thinking of siliconing where the base tile meets the floor - is this proper? Some guy told me to use grout but this seems kinda sketchy, like it will crack if the floor flexes.

Also, on the top of the base tile - grout or silicone? I think grout would look nice but silicone seems like the safer bet.

Any standards here? Advice?
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Unread 08-04-2006, 06:05 PM   #2
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Where the wall meets the floor is a change of plane and should be caulked. The top of the base could be done either way.
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Unread 08-04-2006, 06:07 PM   #3
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You want caulk where the floor meets the wall as movement there is likely. Since the base tiles will move with the wall, grout at the top of the base tiles is OK.
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Unread 08-04-2006, 06:56 PM   #4
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If your grout is sanded go with siliconized sanded caulking. you can find
caulk in a plethora of colors and most likely one that matches your grout.
no need to use pure silicone as well as no need to grout the top of the base
where it meets the wall.
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Unread 08-04-2006, 10:18 PM   #5
jmkeuning
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Thanks for the advice everyone; you all confirmed what I read. I feel bad for the other shopper at the hardware store who told me to use grout. Hope he does not have probs!
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Unread 08-06-2006, 10:34 AM   #6
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Question

Jumping in on this question: I had the same question, and got a slightly different answer on another thread. So I'll post it here. See illustration below.

I was told that "A" is better than "B". However, due to above comments, I have added "C" as the abovementioned option. Which is the "Best" way to handle the floor-wall intersection?

And secondly, is this the proper process order: tile floor > silicone caulk perimeter of floor at wall joint > then grout floor. Then install wall tile > then again recaulk the space above the perimeter (already caulked below) but below the first tile? Questioning whether adding a new bead of caulk line to an already dried bead of perimeter caulkline is a good thing or not. However if you grout it, I assume its not a problem. Whats the industry concensus on this?

THanks, Carolyn
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Last edited by Topspin; 08-06-2006 at 10:41 AM.
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Unread 08-06-2006, 11:29 AM   #7
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A.) is the way to go here I think.

In B.) you have no flex room between the grout/tile surface and the wall. C.) is still grouting between change of planes which you are trying to avoid.

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Unread 08-06-2006, 12:37 PM   #8
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Thanks Igneous,

But can you tell me if its alright to caulk twice with a full curing of base caulk inbetween. detail: since I will have the floor tiles done and will caulk the perimeter, the caulk will cure completely before I will be able to start the wall sections. So by the time I get to caulking the floor-wall joint, in the space between the top of the base tile and the bottom of the wall tile, that previous caulking will be cured. Will the new caulk (same type) adhere perfectly to the previously cured caulk on the perimeter?

Or are you suggesting that I tile everything before putting any caulk in the floor-wall joint? If so, then I'm not confident that I can get caulk all the way to the back of the 1/2" wall tile > and then down to the bottom of the 1/2" base tile too. Still need help?

Thanks

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Unread 08-06-2006, 07:55 PM   #9
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Most of the showers i do are on concrete slab. I use grout where the shower
floor meets the walls. Caulk has a tendency to mildew and i will only caulk
this joint if a crack appears. my .02
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Unread 08-07-2006, 09:01 AM   #10
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Are we talking about the floor and wall in a shower or just on the bathroom floor and some wall tile in the bathroom?
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Unread 08-07-2006, 09:45 AM   #11
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Topspin is talking about a shower install. Deck mud base. Thanks
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Unread 08-07-2006, 10:02 AM   #12
bbcamp
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Grout the finished corner only. Do not attempt to work the caulk all the way into the joint. Instead, insert backerrod to limit the caulk to about 1/4" thickness. This will help the caulk cure properly and prevents waste.

Don't worry about a gap behind the caulk. Any water that gets into that space will drain into the setting bed.
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Unread 08-07-2006, 10:51 AM   #13
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I have a related question for a bathtub on whether to caulk or grout the joint between the tile wall and the rim of a steel tub?

My thinking is that by caulking it you're trapping water behind the caulk. In a tile shower the water can still run down into the shower pan under the tile, but in a tub there's no place for it to go.

Any thoughts?
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Unread 08-07-2006, 01:43 PM   #14
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Bbcamp,
Did I read your post correctly. "Grout finished corner" and then all the rest of your post related to caulking? Or did you mean caulk the finished corner?

Carolyn
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Unread 08-07-2006, 02:33 PM   #15
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Ooops, I did mean caulk.
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