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Unread 07-22-2018, 02:48 PM   #1
Perry555
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Replace on tile on jersey mud installation????????

Quick Summary:
I dropped a pot on one of my tiles and it shattered. I removed the tile and find that it is a “jersey mud job”. Its nor practical to replace the whole floor. I am a complete novice at this. Just want to save some money by doing it myself (although that might be a mistake).
Originally I thought there was backerboard underneath the thinset but upon chiseling with a rotary drill I saw the mesh.

Seeking help on:
How to proceed now? Take out just the thinset maybe using an angle grinder and diamond blade? Keep chiseling and take the whole section including the mesh out an replace using the same technique?
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Unread 07-22-2018, 02:54 PM   #2
Perry555
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Here are some pics:

As you can see on one of the pics, after vacumming the dust away, the wood is visible.

Do I try to retain the mesh? Or cut around it and get to the wood part?
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Unread 07-22-2018, 03:21 PM   #3
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Since you're only trying to fix the single tile I would just scrape enough thinset away so that you can get a decent enough bed of new mortar under the tile and hope for the best.
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Unread 07-22-2018, 03:28 PM   #4
Perry555
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You mean fill the areas where the mortar has come out? The white part is the thinset. Grey is the mortar I think. So I dont need to rebuild it the same way?
If I just put thinset down will it fill all the voids where the mortar is missing due to my chiseling? Will this all self level?
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Unread 07-22-2018, 03:30 PM   #5
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Yeah, I was thinking the same as Ryan. Is this one tile the only problem you have with this floor? Any cracked or loose tiles, cracked grout? Do you have a replacement tile? If the rest of the floor is in good shape and you have a replacement, I'd do that unless you're wanting to replace the floor anyway.

Edit; How thick is the layer of gray mud? This may be a mud job that's on the thin side.
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Unread 07-22-2018, 05:08 PM   #6
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Guys thanks for the feedback. In my original post I focused on the main problem which is replacing the tile.

There are other problems. Yes the mortar is on the thin side. Looking even more closely, its plywood, then I think some paper, then the metal then lots of thinset. The tiles were not backbuttered as when I took it out I didnt see a lot of thinset on the back.

Now the problem since year 1 of the installation 8 years ago is the grout keeps cracking on a certain part of the floor. I have a 1940's era house with wood and laiminate floors mostly. all rooms have some creak so I don't see why the kitchen (where the broken tile is located) would not. In fact it does, but the tiles have not broken (except after dropping something heavy on it like a heavy glass pot lid the other day). Because the tiles have not broken and I dont want to keep replacing the grout I was thinking of using flexible or elastic grout as someone suggested that might work better than traditional grout.

I just want the tile replacement to last and not have to redo it (and I am a DIY novice) thats why Im so cautious and ask so many questions. I think I overstepped my capbility on this task already and should have paid someone to do it but hiring the wrong people can be disastrous (as evidenced by the squeaky kitchen floor). But if at least I know all the factors I can do it myself or hire the right person to finish the fix.
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Unread 07-22-2018, 06:54 PM   #7
Tool Guy - Kg
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If enough of the mortar has been cleaned away that you can drop a spare tile into its position and the tile sits a tiny bit lower than it’s neighbors, you’re ready to install the new tile. You’re going to mix up some mortar per directions, then spread a very thin layer onto the back of the tile. Then fill in the holes of the floor and spread an even layer over that. Try to comb the mortar in a single direction. Then mush the tile into position shifting it from side to side, perpendicular to the direction of the combed mortar until it’s flush with all its neighbors. Clean out the mortar that’s oozing from the joints and center the tile. After 24 hours, go ahead and grout.

Okay, if you’ve got a Jersey Mud Job and some of the same grout keeps cracking repeatedly, there’s little you can do. Sure, you can use a sealant like color-matched 100% silicone in the grout joints. But realize that movement under tile that is capable of cracking grout is capable of cracking the tile. The movement is destined to reduce the life span of the tile job.

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Unread 07-22-2018, 09:17 PM   #8
Perry555
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When you say mortar, you actually mean thinset? Because the current build up is plywood, then paper then the metal mesh and then mortar over that then finally thinset between the mortar and tile. But you are saying I can fill all voids with thinset and lay the tile provided the height is OK?
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Unread 07-22-2018, 09:19 PM   #9
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Yes
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Unread 07-22-2018, 09:43 PM   #10
cx
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Perry, the word mortar is used for a number of different compounds in the tile industry and can be confusing at times.

Another common mistake is calling any such product "thinset." Thinset is a method of setting tile, not a product. Thinset mortar is the material that is used to bond the tile to the substrate in the thinset method.

A sand and Portland cement mixture is frequently used as a substrate for tile installations and is referred to as mortar in the industry. It's commonly called deck mud. Another mortar is that used to create wall tiling substrates and is frequently called wall mud or fat mud. But in tile industry documents it is referred to as mortar.

Lots of mortars out there. Best to be very specific when making reference to any of them if you want to avoid confusion, eh?

My opinion; worth price charged.
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