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Old 03-24-2018, 08:39 PM   #1
Mr_Ed
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Shower curb length

I was planning to build the base of my shower curb with non-treated 2x4s. However, my span is 82". Is that acceptable? Will the 2x4s provide enough stability? Any insight would be appreciated.
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Old 03-24-2018, 08:42 PM   #2
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Is this going on a slab or a subfloor?

WHat are you using for your waterproofing?
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Old 03-24-2018, 08:43 PM   #3
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If you are on a slab, I usually drill and anchor Tapcon screws into the first 2x4 about every 12-16 inches apart. Then use deck screws to anchor the next two 2x4's down. You also can set a wood form and pour a concrete curb.
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Old 03-24-2018, 08:47 PM   #4
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Slab. Having a cement/mortar pan poured, so that liner will be there. I was going to use plastic sheet behind the hardiebacker on the walls and ceiling, but we are including a bench and niches, so it has been recommended that we use a surface barrier instead (redgard or equivalent.).
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Old 03-24-2018, 08:54 PM   #5
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I was just wondering if there is a maximum distance for which to use 2x4s.
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Old 03-24-2018, 08:55 PM   #6
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Ed, either one will work and the Redgard will be more expensive. But one thing I try to bring up is that the surface membrane will help when you are setting your tiles. Most cement boards are thirsty and will cause your thinset to dry out fairly fast after you spread it. Once the thinset is spread, you have to work in a hurry to get it covered. If it dries too much the tiles won't stick very well. The surface membrane will keep the cement board from drying out your thinset as fast. That's what I would do.

If there's a maximum curb length, I don't know what it is. I think you'll be fine as long as you anchor it well or pour a concrete curb.
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Old 03-24-2018, 09:09 PM   #7
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Thumbs up

Thanks for your feedback. I plan to proceed with the 2x4s.
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Old 03-25-2018, 12:01 AM   #8
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Tape some plastic down on the area, leave it for 24-hours or so, and see if there's any moisture that accumulates. Some parts of FL have a pretty high water table, and depending on how the slab was installed, you might have a fair amount of moisture vapor coming up. In this case, making your curb out of say concrete bricks or concrete may be more reliable than wood that won't be able to breath once covered with a waterproof barrier. Personally, I'd use a waterproof membrane over the entire shower verses using a liquid. Either can work, but a sheet membrane has advantages. You could make your curb with one of the foam ones available, or from foam panels as well.
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Old 03-25-2018, 07:52 AM   #9
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If you're working on a slab, mortar some utility bricks down instead of using lumber.

Using masonry instead of lumber eliminates moisture/warpage issues totally.
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Old 04-04-2018, 03:20 PM   #10
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Recessed light in shower

Fairly new here, so I hope I phrase this question correctly for you all.

I am installing a 4" recessed light in my new shower. Ceiling will be tiled. 1/2" hardie backer is already installed on the ceiling, with the 4" hole cutout in place. Here's the question.

Do I install the light can before or after the tile? The instructions say to install it on the "finished" surface, but it also says that the total thickness should not be greater than 3/4". My hardiebacker + thinset + tile will be about 1".
If I install the light before the tile, can I tile over the surface-flange of the light fixture; and then install the trim over the finished tile? (yes, it is a wet-location trim piece).

Thanks for any advice.
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Old 04-04-2018, 04:05 PM   #11
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If you ever wanted to replace the light fixture, you wouldn't want to have to tear out the ceiling tile!

I'd contact the manufacturer to see if they have an adapter that would let you install it in that thicker ceiling, or, a possibility would be to make the hole in the ceiling larger to accommodate the flange, and rely on the tile and maybe backerboard to accommodate that 4" hole needed so you could snug it up to that surface and still be within the limits. You could even just have it hanging on the tile, and have the cbu cut out as well, and be assured it would fit as long as you clean up any squeeze out of thinset on the back. Unless you're using a small tile, if at least the majority if it is on the backer, it should have more than enough strength. That light assembly probably doesn't weigh more than 3-4 pounds, and the bond strength of a tile to the backer should be at least 50x psi more, and could approach 100x more psi.
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Old 04-04-2018, 05:19 PM   #12
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The can probably has little clips that pop out and snag the backside of dry wall to hold the can in the hole. The can should go in over the finished ceiling. If you are tiling the ceiling it would go over the tile. The can and the light should be rated for wet area. The can will have a little gasket to seal the hole and the led should be fully sealed.

Now you could bust out the clips and hold the can in the hole via some other means... or maybe modify the clips.
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Old 04-04-2018, 05:24 PM   #13
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or just install the can in the hardie and tile over the flange. it isn't going to hurt it. usually the trim has some kind of gasket to seal to the tile.
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Old 04-04-2018, 08:41 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reefone View Post
or just install the can in the hardie and tile over the flange. it isn't going to hurt it. usually the trim has some kind of gasket to seal to the tile.


Not sure about 4 inchers, but wouldn't want to do this with a six. Those cans are meant to slip back inside to give you access to the electrical junction. That is, if you don't have access from above.
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Old 05-07-2018, 01:07 PM   #15
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Shower

Hi all:

I have my new shower framed and ready for shower pan work (see attached picture).

I have had 3 plumbers give me estimates, and all 3 want to attach Hardiebacker to the curb over the top of the liner; and then just Redgard it.

I thought I read somewhere that this is not acceptable.
Comments? Suggestions?
Thanks.

(p.s. The drain and wall blocking will be completed before the pan).
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