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Unread 04-06-2004, 11:25 AM   #1
30all
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bathroom threshold options

I plan to lay down 1/2" Cement Board on the bath floor, then 3/8" thick proceline marble- look tiles, so there is ~1" higher than plywood subfloor.
what is my options for threshold to meet current carpeted bedroom (plan to replace carpet with 3/4" hardwood once I finish the bath)? stone stripe? or just hardwood trim to meet the tiles in the future?

I'm not sure if I should put threshold on cement board? or on plywood directly (need 1" to meet tiled area)? or on future hardwood floor ( delay the threshhold until hardwood floor is done)

what is the common approach from experts? Thanks
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Unread 04-06-2004, 06:06 PM   #2
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Hi 30, That name ain't gonna work.

I think if you stop your tile installation hafway under the door in a neat line, you can just use a quarter-inch wood reducer when you put in the hardwood.
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Unread 04-06-2004, 07:14 PM   #3
MHI
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Hi 30,

I always like a marble threshold no matter what floor is next to it. The thick threshold (or strip as you called it) will make the transition between the different heights, and it goes great with any tile floor.
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Unread 04-06-2004, 07:19 PM   #4
doitright
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Hi 30 something!

In addition to John's suggestion, I always teminate my tile with a piece of Schluter Schiene. Looks nice, and protects edge of tile.
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Unread 04-07-2004, 07:08 AM   #5
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Thank you, guys. btw, my name is Andy, sorry for forgetting leave my name at the end of my posting.
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Unread 04-07-2004, 09:08 AM   #6
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Is there a particular reason you're using half-inch CBU, Andy? Quarter-inch would leave your tile very close to the height of your wood floor when you install it, seems to me.

Have we previously discussed the structure of the floor you're tiling over?

If you elect to use a wood reducer, it will want to be set on the subfloor rather than on the CBU.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 04-07-2004, 09:38 AM   #7
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No particular reason, I just figure it may give me more solid feel under my feet. I not sure about the structure of the subfloor, my house is 10 year old, the bath is on 2nd floor, the subfloor is 3/4" plywood, not sure about the joists and it span.
I remember read somewhere which says adding 1/2" CBB will stiff the subfloor, tiling will be easier, Is that right?

-Andy
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Unread 04-07-2004, 10:40 AM   #8
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Nope, actually that's not correct, which is why I suggested the quarter-inch CBU instead. You get no extra structural points at all for the increase in CBU thickness, it's considered non-structural and is only there to provide a friendly tiling substrate.

Can you determine the depth, width, spacing, and longest unsupported span of your floor structure? This is very important before you go any further with a tile installation. If your joist structure is not sufficient, you may be tossing away good money laying tile.

For span, you can get a good idea by figuring out where the support walls are on the first floor and whatever is below that. Up there in Yankee Land you may have floor heat registers that could be removed for a peek. Worst case, drill some holes in inconspicuous places to take measurements. I like big holes, like a 3 or 4 inch hole saw, and such holes are very easy to patch. Or perhaps there is an easy place in the ceiling of a closet or some such on the first floor to poke a hole, but it's really easier to fix the hole in the subfloor above. You need to find out what you've got.

Or you could rely on the ol' jump test, but I'd rather have measurements.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 04-13-2004, 11:50 AM   #9
30all
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CX,
here is what I found out the condition of my 2nd-floor bath.
3/4" plywood on 2x10, 16" oc joists and the 2 walls of the family room underneath is 14 feet across, I assume these 2 walls support the joists in some way, not sure if its the span you called.

Do you think the subfloor is strong enough to be tiled with 1/2" or 1/4" CBU? or I need to add a layer of plywood?

Thank you

-Andy
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Unread 04-13-2004, 12:07 PM   #10
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Your joists are fine for ceramic tile assuming the family room walls are supported by the foundation or a load bearing beam or some such. Use the 1/4" CBU over your existing 3/4" plywood and stop worrying about it. You got better things to worry about, like grout color and Listellos and the like.
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Unread 02-23-2005, 04:10 PM   #11
Tile Challenged Ronnie
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Threshold Revealed - What Next???

The saga continues. . . But at least we now see a light at the end. . .

So far,

1) We removed the tilted tiles along the edge that started this whole thing.
2) We removed all the mortar that was beneath, which revealed a 3" wide gap between the end of the cement board and beginning of the hallway threshhold.
3) We removed a couple of the hallway floor wood pieces directly adjacent to the gap we will need to fill (which were nasty), and will fabricate a nice hardwood threshhold or saddle to place in the area.

WHAT'S NEXT:

1) Design and fabricate the threshhold (Saddle)
2) Install the threshhold
3) Float cement into the gap created where the cement board ended too soon. (3" from hallway floor)
4) Re-lay the remaining tiles needed to finish the bathroom floor, which will (hopefully) butt up nicely against the new threshhold/saddle!!
5) Grout

Does this sound about right???

Does anyone have any suggestions about fabricating and installing this threshhold? I am attaching some photos, including detail at each door jamb to see what we're dealing with here. Got a woodworker in the family, just haven't done this before.*

*We can't decide if we should leave the height flush, or slightly raised???

Any thoughts???

Any ideas or pearls of wisdom are WELCOME!!

Thanks!

TCR
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