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Unread 01-03-2006, 02:58 PM   #1
emptysea
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Problem With Outside Tile

Actually the tile is inside, the problem is outside. My entryway is getting wet. We want to retile over the existing tile, but we can't until we solve the water issue. I've had the outside reflashed 3 times the last couple years, and nothing seems to help.

A contractor suggested using pressure treated lumber with lead over it, to create a slope on the sides. It won't work for the front, he said he would calk that. He wants a $1,000 to do this, but the idea doesn't sound right to me.

The water is coming in mostly in the front corners, and a little in the front. The gutters were recently cleaned and working good. Since you guys are the waterproofing experts, I thought maybe you could give me some ideas on preparing the outside so I could tile the 50 or so feet inside.

Thank You.
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Unread 01-03-2006, 03:01 PM   #2
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Well, one thing that should be done...

A drain extender should be put on that gutter drain so it doesn't dump the water so close to the foundation. A minimum of 18" is what is recommended, even though I would like to see 24" or more. A picture of exactly where the water is coming in on the inside of the house may be helpful. Hang on for one of the builders in the forum that should give you more advice...
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Unread 01-03-2006, 03:03 PM   #3
emptysea
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Thanks, laniepoo7, all of my pics did not post. It keeps saying files too large. I am in the process of resizing, but it doesn't seem to work.
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Unread 01-03-2006, 03:07 PM   #4
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more pics:
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Unread 01-03-2006, 03:10 PM   #5
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Another thing I saw in the pics...

Maybe it is an optical illusion, but it looks like the concrete sill in front of this corner is sloped towards the house. That idea is reinforced by the way the mildew is growing along that front corner. If that area is flat, or worse sloped towards the house, that could be why the water is getting in. One thing about water is that is always runs downhill. That being said, it would not get in your house if the ground around the house (and in this case the concrete sills) were properly sloped away from exterior walls. Caulk is usually not a long term fix for improper grading.
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Last edited by laniepoo7; 01-03-2006 at 03:11 PM. Reason: Changed "fron" to "front"
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Unread 01-03-2006, 03:19 PM   #6
emptysea
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lainepoo7, It's pretty much flat, not sloped towards the house. It's built on what used to be concrete steps. The tile is directly over the concrete. We put new drywall in recently, and it's naturally getting wet in the inside corners. It's dry in most of the hall, it's just the front corners, and the front. (and the rest of the house does not look as bad as the entry does, *lol*)
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Unread 01-03-2006, 03:53 PM   #7
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Even a flat surface can let water in...

In that picture, it does appear that the sill is sloped towards that offending corner. All surfaces should actively slope away from the house. Not as much slope as a shower drain, but enough so that water doesn't build up near the house. A builder on these forums will come along with some recommendations on what can be done to correct your water seepage. If you don't get an answer tonight, try to PM CX. He is a builder/moderator that gives great advice on this sort of stuff...There are many others, but he is the one I see around the most...
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Unread 01-03-2006, 04:01 PM   #8
elCid72
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emptysea ... got a name we can use?

In the third pic, it looks like there is some kind of flashing over the top step, and extending behind the siding or trim. I would remove that flashing, and the trim, and use a grinder to create a definate slope away from the house. Then reflash and rep[lace the trim. The is not enough slope to keep the water from wicking under the sill and into the house.

I would also remove the door threshold and grind a slope there also. It's a little hard to tell from the pics (but they are very helpful), but it looks like a poorly planned addition.
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Unread 01-03-2006, 04:30 PM   #9
emptysea
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Thanks laniepoo7, and I will get gutter extenders.

elCid72, Grinding a slope into the concrete sounds like a good idea, I didn't know you could do that. It must be a tough job. The only problem would be the very front, I think it might make it hard to step up. I am wondering if we should use some kind of waterproofing material around it before the flashing goes on? Like redguard on a shower, if there is something that would seal it besides calk? It was a poorly constructed addition. I think they should have built it so it overhangs the concrete, like a house does on a regular foundation.

Michelle
(Sorry I forgot to post it before)
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Unread 01-03-2006, 09:33 PM   #10
Theoderik
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I would Kerdi the entire exterior of the house. That'll fix it.

(snicker)

sw (shawn)
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