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Unread 01-13-2022, 01:41 PM   #16
tillytiles
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Thank you @jeffnc!

I think cutting the partial tiles first is the way I'll do it.

The reason I was thinking of doing the partial cuts last is because there isn't a consistent full first horizontal laser line to line all of the first row up to, and so even a tiny difference in one of the 3 different cuts will screw things up.

But now thinking about it, there isn't a full horizontal laser line for the first row of full tiles either....either way, I have to triple check all of those horizontal offsets for the first row by moving the laser up and down each successive tile I lay to ensure the rest goes well.
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Unread 01-13-2022, 01:49 PM   #17
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Well your design is going to look pretty random so it will probably look OK no matter what you do. But of course you want it to be exact, so you really just have to check any time you get 2 columns that peak 4 tiles apart and check the tops with a level. Then the next column over will form 2 more peaks and check that, etc. I probably wouldn't even bother moving the laser level around - I might rather use that just for the vertical lines.
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Unread 01-13-2022, 02:00 PM   #18
jadnashua
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Thinset bonds to drywall fine, you could use thinset to bond the niche in place.

Depending on the size of the bar or whatever you are trying to anchor, Wingits fasteners are rated to exceed the ADA 300# requirement but you need a big hole saw to install one, or their spade bit which worked surprisingly well on the softer tile I had on one install.
https://www.wingits.com/wingitspdfs/..._SpecSheet.pdf
https://www.wingits.com/wingitspdfs/...tener_Spec.pdf
I've used both series, and they work.
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Unread 01-13-2022, 03:02 PM   #19
tillytiles
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Thanks @RichVT and @jadnashua

Jim - That looks like one crazy anchor! I should have specified that I need to mount the hooks into a niche that backs into a divider wall for the vanity - so I can't go through the drywall. Needs to be something that mounts between the tile and the wedi board or between the tile/backerboard and the opposite side of wall sheetrock.
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Unread 01-13-2022, 03:34 PM   #20
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Some time ago someone posted a link to a similar behind the tile hook product that was engineered to be inly in the grout line. the "post" was flat so there was no need to notch the tile for a round post. Just don't remember where I saw it or what the minimum size joint was needed.

Expensive, as I recall, but pretty neat.
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Unread 01-14-2022, 02:27 PM   #21
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Do you work off of the lowest spot on tub deck and then trim/grind each tile to keep the gap between tub deck and tiles consistent as you go along or do you start with the highest spot, and let the tub-tile gap vary as you go along?

The difference between my highest and lowest spot is a 1/8th.
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Unread 01-14-2022, 03:06 PM   #22
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You'd want to start with a full tile at the lowest place on the tub deck (actually shimmed 1/8th" above the deck) and trim the rest of the tiles to keep the top of the row straight and level.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 01-14-2022, 03:53 PM   #23
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Thank you CX. I’ve marked everything out starting with the lowest spot, although I’ve only put in a 1/16 space. I see some threads debating the 1/16 or 1/8 gap. I figure the cast iron tub shouldn’t expand and contract as much as the tubs made from other materials.
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Unread 01-14-2022, 04:00 PM   #24
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I’ve worked hard to try to get my niches to fall exactly on grout lines. To that end I left the niche rough framing a bit bigger and haven’t cut the openings in the wedi panels yet.

What do you guys think about tiling all the way up and around the niche with full tiles (edit: stopping one tile short all around so that I can waterproof) and only then cutting out/rotoziping the backer board perfectly against the grout lines?

Because I left slack in the niche framing, I’d then pad out the sides and bottom to fall exactly with my grout lines.

Is there a reason I wouldn’t do this? I’m thinking maybe the vibrations from cutting the board…? Just want to get some input
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Unread 01-14-2022, 04:17 PM   #25
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Benjaminn, even that cast iron tub is a whole hellovalot heavier when filled with water and humans than when empty. It's gonna move. I can't argue for or against the difference in thermal expansion between that tub and a formed steel tub.

You can do your niche in any manner you think will work for you so long as you get it solidly mounted and properly waterproofed.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 01-14-2022, 04:29 PM   #26
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cx - do you think I ought to rethink the 1/16 gap and go with a 1/8?
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Unread 01-14-2022, 04:30 PM   #27
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Yes.
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Unread 01-15-2022, 08:19 PM   #28
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Is it preferable to do the entire first row around a tub on all 3 sides, then proceed to build up the back wall and then finish the sides?

I have the first row on the back wall, now not sure whether to proceed to the sides, or to continue building up the back.

Thank for all of your advice!
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Unread 01-15-2022, 08:29 PM   #29
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Entirely up to you, Benjaminn. Some folks like to tile the entire back wall first, then the sides. Others will complete a row around the entire shower before moving up. The important thing is to make sure all the rows remain level all around the shower.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 01-15-2022, 09:50 PM   #30
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Because of the odd layout I’m working with, vertical subway offset by 1/4ths, I’m almost wondering if it would make more sense to lay by columns and not rows. Just in terms of applying the thin-set and not having to notch trowel around all of those nooks and crannies row by row. Maybe start with a full center column and then build out from there?
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