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Unread 11-06-2021, 03:29 PM   #16
jadnashua
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KerdiBoard is available in panel thicknesses of 3/16", 3/8", 1/2", 5/8", 3/4", 1", 1-1/2", and 2" (5, 9, 12.5, 15, 19, 25, 38, and 50 mm), but other than 1/2", might be harder to find.

Using 2" KerdiBoard, you can construct the entire bench out of it with no wood at all, or, if the size works out, buy a preformed bench.

1/2" Kerdiboard on wood framing would not be strong enough to sit on, but the 2" stuff certainly is. If you clad the framing with plywood, you could put thinner Kerdiboard on it, but my preference would be to avoid the wood entirely as the Kerdiboard would be more stable. ON an outside wall, a thicker Kerdiboard panel would also give you more insulation, which has merit, too.
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Unread 11-06-2021, 03:49 PM   #17
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Good to know. I’ll have to think on that. I did have another thought for the furring issue on that one wall where I would have to fur out the entire length of the bathroom wall instead of just the part inside the shower (which is also the bench wall).

What’s your opinion on maybe just doing that entire length of wall in drywall and covering the shower part with Kerdi membrane down to the bench. I could use shorter drywall screws so the furring strips wouldn’t need to be furring out any more. The other two walls would be Kerdi board but it might make sense to just do that one wall with drywall.


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Unread 11-06-2021, 04:16 PM   #18
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Drywall works just fine underneath the Kerdi membrane...it just doesn't have much insulation value if that's useful.
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Unread 11-06-2021, 05:12 PM   #19
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That wouldn’t be a problem on that wall. The other side of the wall used to be an outside patio but they had it enclosed, so it would be ok. That might be the easiest way to handle that problembut I’ll keep thinking.


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Unread 11-09-2021, 09:11 PM   #20
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This is more of a drywall question but it’s part of the plans and I know many of you have experience with it. We are replacing all of the drywall In the rest of the bathroom outside the shower. The last time I did this I tried my best to match the knock down texture on the ceiling where I taped over the old texture at the wall/ceiling joint. Do I have to tape that joint or can I caulk it? I’ll mud and tape it if it is better, but it’s really hard to match that texture on the ceiling. Is it worth it when I can just caulk it?
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Unread 11-09-2021, 09:15 PM   #21
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You could caulk it. I'd use some foam backer rod to help save some material, and it actually makes for a more reliable joint. Choose a paintable caulk.
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Unread 01-09-2022, 08:34 AM   #22
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Window and pipe

Hi all, we haven’t done anything up til now but it’s time to start moving ahead. 2 questions…

1. For furring out the existing furring strips on the block wall, does it matter if those strips are pressure treated or not?

I should add - there is 3/4” PT on there now attached to the block. Also - it will be a while before we get to putting up the Kerdi board so there would be time for it to dry I think. Plan is to just use some construction adhesive and 18guage Brad nailer to attach. (If PT, would that be a problem?)

2. Soldering a fitting below the slab to move that pipe into the stud bay - can that be a normal solder or does it need to be brazed?

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Unread 01-09-2022, 09:07 AM   #23
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Use non-treated furring strips, Greg. The new ones won't be against the block, and the non-treated wood will be more stable. But first be sure the existing furring is solidly attached to the block. Attach the new furring to the old with construction adhesive and nails.

Just solder those joints. Brazing can produce a stronger joint but, due to the higher temps needed, brazing can also oxidize the thin, soft copper and make it more brittle.
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Unread 01-09-2022, 09:25 AM   #24
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Thanks!! I appreciate it!!


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Unread 01-09-2022, 09:37 AM   #25
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I agree with Dan on the non-treated furring strips.

I disagree with Dan on soldering the below-grade copper tubing joint. If I really had no other option but to have a joint in the copper below grade (not a sanctioned operation), I'd want it brazed or "hard-soldered" using Sil-Fos or similar. Same alloy we use on most HVAC copper joints.

But looking at your photo in post #3, I think you should be able to get that copper into the wall by chipping out a bit more concrete. Probably chipping out less concrete than you'll need to remove to have reasonable access for brazing a joint in the copper. Can't tell from which direction the copper comes below grade, but still looks like you should be able to get it into the wall at least below the level of the mortar bed you'll need for the shower receptor.

I'd even go so far as to fur out that wall 3/4" to avoid a below grade joint.

What am I missing?
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Unread 01-09-2022, 11:18 AM   #26
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There are pros and cons for brazing copper tubing, Greg, the Google will tell you all you need to know to make an informed decision. I do remember one of the key reasons for brazing copper pipe joints in HVAC applications is brazed joints withstand equipment induced vibrations better than soldered joints, a condition you won't have.

I definitely agree with cx; striving to avoid burying a joint is the way to go if you can.
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Unread 01-09-2022, 02:07 PM   #27
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Ok - thanks guys. One thing we talked about was furring out that wall because of the pipe, and they liked the idea of furring it out just on the bottom half to create a ledge half way up the wall for shampoo bottles, etc...It would be a much wider fur out but it could be an option.

I do not really want to solder down below anyway, so if I can avoid it I will.

That hole was what I found after we removed the tub. The copper is barely out of the stud bay, but it still is out. If the shower receptor takes up some of that, it will be good.

CX - when you say I might be able to get it in the wall after chipping out some concrete - do you mean be bending or do you mean digging out dirt and seeing if the whole pipe can shift? I agree - it doesn't need a lot, but it needs something.

Thanks again - you all are the best.
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Unread 01-09-2022, 05:46 PM   #28
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I was thinking chipping away some concrete and bending the pipe just slightly more. And you must be very careful if you elect to do that. Old copper gets age-hardened and a bit more brittle than fresh tubing. It gets much more difficult to bend and you certainly don't want to damage the tube down there. I've never actually seen old, even very old, Type L copper, crack when being bent, but I suppose it could happen. Just don't be getting any tools down there with sharp edges when trying to augment the existing bend (I'm guessing).

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 01-11-2022, 06:39 PM   #29
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Thanks! I'll carefully try that.

This was what I was going to use to fur out that block wall:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-in-x-2...009348#overlay

I would attach that to the existing furring strip. My only 3 worries are:

1) Will construction adhesive and 18 guage brad nails securely attach them to the existing strip or do I need a more heavy duty nail?

2) Will it be secure enough to hold the weight of the wall. (Tile and Kerdi in the shower and drywall outside the shower)

3) Will they split when I screw in the wallboard?

I feel pretty good about it, but just wanted to double check I am using the right furring strip.

Thanks,
Greg
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Unread 01-11-2022, 06:46 PM   #30
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1. The construction adhesive will hold it quite well and the 18ga brads will hold it while the adhesive cures. The adhesive would prefer better clamping, but it will handle your application. Use lots.

2. Yes, if done properly.

3. Quite possibly, which is why I always use rips of plywood in the applicable thickness for all such structural furring.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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