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Unread 06-24-2021, 01:18 PM   #1
Barmaley
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Trapped Moisture

If I use a liquid membrane inside of a cement board on a shower wall and the back of the wall meets exterior wall with vapor wrapping will I trap water between shower wall and exterior wall? If water is trapped there it may develop mold!
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Unread 06-24-2021, 02:11 PM   #2
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Welcome, Vasily.

I've separated your question from the other visitor's unrelated thread to avoid confusion in both places.

We can better answer this and some other types of questions if you'll add a geographic location to your User Profile.

But the short answer is yes, you can trap moisture between the two moisture barriers. Whether it becomes a problem depends upon how much moisture (geographic location is important here) gets into the material between the barriers, what the material is, whether it contains organic material that can feed mold, whether it has any opportunity to dry at all, and some other considerations. It's what we (TYW) lovingly refer to as a moisture sandwich.

Bottom line? Don't do that. Not worth taking a chance of creating a problem where none exists in a proper installation.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 07-09-2021, 08:07 PM   #3
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No spacers layout

Hello,

I am trying to do DIY 30x60 bath tile walls. I have 12x12 granite tiles. May I lay then without space for grout or it is a bad idea? The reason for me to do this way is then I would not need to cut tiles, if I use space between tiles I will have to cut at least 1/8 of the last row.
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Unread 07-09-2021, 08:16 PM   #4
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Granite tile tend to have a very small bevel on their edges and it's nowhere near enough for grout to bond well...plus, even though the tile are usually ground to quite close tolerances, without grout in between them, they'll still allow crud to accumulate in between.

IOW, do not lay them butted up together...you'll need generally at least 1/16" spacing to be able to push unsanded grout into that space and have it strong enough to stay. The grout also helps to stabilize the edges.
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Unread 07-09-2021, 08:18 PM   #5
Barmaley
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Jim,

Thank you very much for your advice! If you do granite wall - will you 1/16 or 1/8 and why?
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Unread 07-09-2021, 08:22 PM   #6
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In the granite tile that I've installed, I've used 1/16" grout joints. Using a larger grout joint could be a feature, depending on the stone you've chosen and the grout color you select. If you go with something like SPectralock, you can get it with sparkles, or UV glowing that could make a really interesting effect, depending on your needs...but, in my case, I've chosen a smaller joint and grout that does not contrast with the stone, and thus mostly is hidden.

Basically, it depends on what you want, but don't butt them up tight.
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Unread 07-09-2021, 08:40 PM   #7
Barmaley
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This is going to be my first granite wall if not counting 2 row of tiles around a bathroom floor. What is easier to do for a noob like me - 1/16 or 1/8?
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Unread 07-09-2021, 08:44 PM   #8
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One more question. I am retrofitting an existing tub and I found that the right wall of the bath is not plum, however the studs are straight and surface is flat, so if I screw in cement backing the wall will be slanted but flat. It is about 8 mm off on the 6' vertical span. Would you nail in shims to the studs and if you do how where can I get accurate thickness shims?
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Unread 07-10-2021, 07:32 AM   #9
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Vasily,

1/16th grout joints can be a challenge if the tiles you are working with are not very, very close in size. In other words, if your tile range from, say, 11 15/16" square to 12 1/16" square a wider grout joint gives you some wiggle room to account for the different sizes. So measure several of your tiles first, and take samples from different boxes.

As far as your outta plumb wall goes you might be able to employ drywall shims. They are basically cardboard strips, about 1.5" wide and 1/16th" thick.

Since you mentioned cement backing, remember you need to use an alkali resistant mesh tape and thinset mortar on the seams and inside corners.

What do you intent to use for water proofing?
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Unread 07-10-2021, 09:02 AM   #10
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I bought red guard. Is it good?
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Unread 07-10-2021, 09:24 AM   #11
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If you're talking about Custom's RedGard, if it's used exactly as instructed it will do what it's advertised to do, Vasily.
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Unread 07-10-2021, 09:58 AM   #12
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I am planning to do it only in the corners and over the screws so the bathwalls could breath
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Unread 07-10-2021, 10:34 AM   #13
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Just one cautionary note in addition to Jim's excellent advice: If you use a grout like Spectralock, make sure you do a test piece first. Epoxy grouts can alter the appearance of natural stone. Happened to marble I grouted with it. It now has a different look (almost like a wet look). I ended up liking it, but that was accidental. Having said this, other synthetic grouts might do the same with natural stone. Just a cautionary note before you go all in with a certain product.
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Unread 07-10-2021, 10:37 AM   #14
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Vasily, if you are tiling a shower/tub surround, you must waterproof the whole assembly, not just screws and corners. "Breathing" is not desirable. If these are just regular walls without water exposure, you don't need Redgard at all, unless you want to create a wet room of sorts.
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Unread 07-10-2021, 11:08 AM   #15
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Water protection is the issue which does not let me sleep. The world is divided into two groups: first believes that the mold develops if you do complete water barrier and second claims that most develops if you do not do complete water barrier. I don't know whom to believe?
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