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Unread 12-15-2010, 10:32 PM   #16
MarkTarkus
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Yeah it sucks. I bring my saw in the house at night unless it's set up in a customers house.
If I'm working new construction I always ask gc or owner to get furnace running before I start mixing any cements. If they can't for some reason I usually charge a reasonable daily fee for me to run my diesel fuel heater that'll make it nice and toasty.

Typically they will turn on the furnace.

All my caulks, sealers, liquids, epoxies, primers etc. have been moved to their winter home in the kitchen closet.
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Unread 12-15-2010, 11:13 PM   #17
duneslider
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Mark,

Your wife must love winter.

My truck fits in the garage and it usually seems to stay just warm enough in there to keep things from freezing. When we start getting extended temps below 20 degrees I brings some stuff inside.
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Unread 12-15-2010, 11:35 PM   #18
Toddman
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Ya, this time of year sucks for the wet saw. The trouble I have with the MK's is the tray freezes up on the rails faster than the lines do. I opened up the trailer yesterday and the water tray on the little MK blew out a corner after going over a railroad track on the way to work. That poly gets pretty brittle when it's cold.
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Unread 12-16-2010, 12:05 AM   #19
Hamilton
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I just put hot water in my saw in the morning. Takes the chill off until the sun comes out. When it gets really nasty, I leave a bucket heater in the saw pan.
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Unread 12-16-2010, 01:57 AM   #20
Higher Standard Tile
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Unread 12-16-2010, 08:10 AM   #21
Houston Remodeler
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The next great idea

Just thinking out loud here.....

A wet saw cozy to keep your saw warm overnight, and a bit more visually attractive than that clunky machine. The wife will prefer the look and the kids won't play with the adjustments.

Upgrade to the electric cozy for your diesel wet saws

Product reps could give them out, stamp their names on the sides.

Mini one for your head
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Unread 12-16-2010, 08:35 AM   #22
muskymike
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Cold weather? Sheesh It's suppose to get up to 22 today. Heat wave. I have a torpedo heater set up inna garage at the job blowing right on the saw. I got the garage up to 40 when it was 0 out.
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Unread 12-16-2010, 08:43 AM   #23
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I'm working in the first in floor heated garage in a long time. I need a little umbrella for my coffee to go with the balmy room temp
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Unread 12-16-2010, 01:30 PM   #24
JC
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i have just been cutting inside and using hot water to fill my saw..thaws out quick.

My question is if the hydration process gets suspended due to extreme cold..will if start again once it warms up provided it did not freeze and pop the tiles..?
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Unread 12-16-2010, 02:00 PM   #25
tileman2000
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I've been using the wet saw outdoors for a week in the 20's and below.I just drop the pump into a bucket of water and place the bucket heater in there to keep the water flowing nice and hot.The tile doesn't stick to the guide and the lines don't freeze.The only issue I have is the on/off switch gets harder to move as the day goes on.

Jim,If the tile is set without heat there's a good possibility the tile won't bond to the surface it's sitting on.We did a job a couple years ago in a condo highrise that had zero heat.We were called back for cracks in the tile and chipping grout.Ended up removing the whole floor once the temps were back up in the spring.
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Unread 12-16-2010, 03:01 PM   #26
scott anthony
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Jim, that was next my question exactly.
Yo Bob.

My question is if the hydration process gets suspended due to extreme cold..will if start again once it warms up provided it did not freeze and pop the tiles..?
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Unread 12-16-2010, 03:49 PM   #27
tileman2000
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Scott,it all depends on how soon heat gets to the thin-set.If it goes too long,the possibility of it bonding correctly is limited.
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Unread 12-16-2010, 05:03 PM   #28
scott anthony
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So for you deep northerners that set a floor and done let's say 4:00pm in a freeze climate, that slab has to be near 40 with no heat that eve. Yes you can heat while you work but isn't it when you stop the problems can occur.
I sure feel for you guys, I bitch and moan at a few days a year.
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Unread 12-16-2010, 09:58 PM   #29
cx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott
My question is if the hydration process gets suspended due to extreme cold..will if start again once it warms up provided it did not freeze and pop the tiles..?
Scott, thin sections of concrete mix, such as you would have with thinset mortars, may act a bit differently than larger sections of poured concrete, but parts of the process remain the same.

Hydration does not actually cease until you get below 14 degrees, Fahrenheit. Above that temperature, there is still something going on, but it may be reeeeeeeal slow.

If poured concrete is frozen soon after placement, it can lose substantial compressive strength, which it will never regain. If, on the other hand, the poured mix is allowed to reach something in the neighborhood of 500psi before it freezes (somewhere in the neighborhood of 24 hours for a decent mix), and if that freezing happens only once and then the concrete is cured under favorable conditions, it'll likely recover all, or nearly all, of it's strength. It'll likely never be the same as far as permeability and other characteristics, but it'll still be good concrete.

Freezing later in the curing cycle becomes less and less harmful, but should still be avoided.

Bigger problem I've always feared for thinset mortars and cementitious grouts is that if they freeze, or are cured at low, but above freezing temperatures, there is even more chance that they can dry sufficiently to stop the hydration process before it has reached any meaningful level. If, however, those installations were damp-cured while in those same low temperature conditions, I think they would almost surely cure to their design levels eventually.

It's really important to keep the temperatures above the advertised minimums for at least that all-important first three days that the ANSI standards call for.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 12-16-2010, 10:00 PM   #30
Dave Gobis
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Thinset does not have the mass that a slab does and basically nothing goes on below 40 and not much below 50.
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