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Unread 02-10-2019, 07:06 AM   #61
Dsimms
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Thanks for the replies. I may have missed it if somebody answered but how do I transition my hardi board to my shower pan? Since the pan was poured without the hardy board in it, and the hardy board is a quarter of an inch or so above the pan with a bead of silicone between the two surfaced, do I tile over the transition as is or put the fiba tape between the pan and the wall and mortar over it to make a complete transition?

So far the walls and pan have been installed as James Hardie recommends.
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Unread 02-19-2019, 05:22 PM   #62
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Did anyone see my last post?
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Unread 02-19-2019, 06:30 PM   #63
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Tried to get the information on your mud bed back a page or so without success, David. If you've already placed your final mud bed and you've installed your wall boards gapped above that mud bed, you do nothing else to that junction. One reason I prefer to see folks use a real CBU instead of Hardiebacker in shower applications. No way to stabilize the bottom of that wallboard unless maybe your shower floor tile rises above the bottom of the wallboard. But what you've done is the way you're supposed to do it according to James Hardie.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 02-19-2019, 09:32 PM   #64
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You might use tape and thinset on the transition like you would a corner. Maybe that will help stabilize the Hardi, not sure.
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Unread 02-23-2019, 12:05 AM   #65
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Thanks for the replies. The hardi board is actually rigid and does not appear to move. I guess I will try the tape the transition and mortar it.

Second question. Hardiboard on the floor butted up to a bathtub face. Should the gap be filled with silicone or something else? I thought I read somewhere that it shouldn’t be filled with mortar.
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Unread 02-23-2019, 06:50 AM   #66
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That floor to tub joint typically gets filled with silicone, David.
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Unread 02-23-2019, 09:49 AM   #67
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Thanks
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Unread 10-08-2019, 08:11 PM   #68
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So I know it’s been a minute since I’ve posted but I’m finally to the point of starting to tile my shower that I built in the beginning of the year. Never having done this before I didn’t realize that my studs in the walls were not perfectly true. That being the case my cbb is not flat horizontally. It is vertically. It’s concave, meaning the center is lower than the outsides by about a 1/4”. I’m trying to decide the solution for this.

I really don’t want to have to rip it all out and redo it for the obvious reasons but if it’s the only way to ensure I make a neat job of the 3 x 6 subway tile then that’s what I’ll have to do.

Could I float the wall with thinset to level it out? Also why would be an acceptable amount of non flatness?
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Unread 10-08-2019, 08:23 PM   #69
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Here is a picture of the shower
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Unread 10-08-2019, 08:57 PM   #70
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David, while you might be able to get a decent looking installation with those small tiles on that wall, I'd want to flatten it.

Certainly the best way would be to remove the wallboard and bring the framing into plane, but you've vetoed that. Second best would be to flatten the wall using one of the many, many cementitious patching materials on the market. Every manufacturer of tile setting products makes at least one such product, some make several. You can also obtain such materials in your local home center back in the concrete products isle.

Thinset mortar is not made for that purpose. The manufacturers will tell you that. The ceramic tile industry will tell you that. Some folks will do it anyway.

For reference, the actual tile industry standard for flatness for the size tile you have is no deviation from intended plane of more than 1/4" in ten feet nor 1/16th" in one foot.

Entirely up to you.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 10-08-2019, 09:20 PM   #71
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Thanks for the advise. Ripping out the cbb isn’t completely vetoed. But if I can go another route and achieve an acceptable outcome then I would want to do that.

Another side note. I apologize to the picture uploading sideways. I’m not sure how to fix that. Looking at the small section of drywall on the outside of the CBB, how far into that could I lay tile? I’ve been trying to decide if I should rip that out and replace it with CBB then just paint what doesn’t get tiled.

As far as the product to put on the wall to flatten it, what type of product would that be called?
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Unread 10-08-2019, 10:15 PM   #72
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As far as the drywall, if it's outside the shower, you can tile over it. If it's right next to the curb, sometimes those areas can get water on them, so it might need some waterproofing under the tile.

Home Depot carries Henry's Feather Finish that will work up to 1/2" thick.
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Unread 10-08-2019, 10:24 PM   #73
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I may be over thinking this, but. I’m guessing even though the instructions for the patching compounds say their for patching the floor, they can be used on a wall? Also, have you or anyone ever had to do something like this? I’m wondering the best way to apply and flatten the material.

Would you use just a standard waterproofing membrane under the tile on the dry wall?

Thanks
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Unread 10-08-2019, 10:33 PM   #74
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I would probably just apply it with a trowel, a little more than needed, then take a long straight edge and start at the bottom and screws it off.

Keep in mind that most of those aren't workable after 10-15 minutes, so have everything ready before you add water to the powder, because after that the clock is ticking. I like to have the trowel, straight edge, and a bucket of water for cleaning tools during and after.

Yes, a standard membrane would work. If there's mud or texture on the sheetrock, you can scrape and/or wash it off before applying the membrane.
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Unread 10-09-2019, 07:35 AM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin
...then take a long straight edge and start at the bottom and screws it off.
I'm thinking Kevin got a little too much help from his device there.

Perhaps screed it off would be the better term in that application?
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