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Unread 10-04-2007, 10:10 AM   #1
BlueCanyon
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Where do you stop the tile in the doorway?

Hi all.

I can't find the answer to this by searching, so I'm just asking.... where do you stop the tile when you get to the doorway? I.e., if you're tiling a bathroom and the next room is carpet, do the tile and carpet meet underneath the closed door? Or does the carpet run all the way under the door and then the tile starts? Does it make a difference if it's a pocket door vs. a regular swinging door?

The devil is in the details, eh?

Mary Ann
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Unread 10-04-2007, 10:16 AM   #2
ChrisIL
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Quote:
I.e., if you're tiling a bathroom and the next room is carpet, do the tile and carpet meet underneath the closed door?
Hi Mary Ann,

The normal answer is yes to this question. I don't think it matters whether it's a swing or pocket door.

But there are always exceptions based on what was there first, door clearances, etc...
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Unread 10-04-2007, 07:36 PM   #3
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1/2 in jamb is what I was taught. but there are times when ya just have pinhc over one side or the other. as in if a whole is a heart beat over the half leave a whole tile
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Unread 10-04-2007, 07:57 PM   #4
Tool Guy - Kg
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Yep, I also have the two materials meet directly under the closed door. I'm pretty sure I'm agreeing with Opie...but not exactly sure...
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Unread 10-04-2007, 08:51 PM   #5
Hamilton
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Hi Mary Ann

I agree with the rest. Split the doorway, under the door itself. You dont
want to see carpet from one side when the door is closed, nor tile from
the other side. Typical doors here are 1&1/2" thick, so i measure in 3/4".
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Unread 10-04-2007, 10:37 PM   #6
Jaz
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Stopping under the closed door is the way to handle regular doorways, but many times we do not do it that way for bathroom doorways. Traditionally we would place a marble threshold in the doorway the width of the wall, (4.5"). This threshold is installed about 1/4" higher than the floor tiles to create a small barrier to stop water and to give something to cut to. When we don't install a threshold, especially in a remodel, we go with tile to the outside edge and finish with a Schluter Schiene. Practices vary depending where in the USA you are. In much of the south, the marble threshold is about 1.5" and stops at the doorstop area.

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Unread 10-05-2007, 08:10 PM   #7
larry528
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I had the same question last week, and I bought both a narrow and a wide threshold. I went with the wide threshold, and here is why. For an interior wall, it doesnt matter, since the door is always open, except when in use. So visually, a wide exposed threshold looks so much better than the narrow one. It has a presecense that says, here ends the carpet, here starts the tile, and its distinctive. With a narrow strip, that would work if the door were always closed. Then it does look best to see carpet on one side, tile the other, and not the other from the opposite side. So if your like most of us, and the door is always open, go wide.

Here is a quick pic. Still have to do final adjusting of the Z strip.

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Last edited by larry528; 10-05-2007 at 08:24 PM.
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Unread 10-05-2007, 09:54 PM   #8
Jaz
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I agree the wider marble works best. Looks like you got the 4" at the HD? Marble was always used here especially when all floors were installed using the mud method. The marble helped the transition from the higher bath floor to hallway. Another small benefit is that when all doors are closed, and you have guests, they can easily figure out which is the bathroom and not enter the wrong room.

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