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Old 09-15-2018, 03:52 PM   #1
mis_desk
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1950's MBR Bathroom Remodel

Hello Everyone,

This is my first time asking for some advice after lurking in the shadows for a bit.

After researching the topic wicking with the CBU inside the mud bed, I still don't see a concise answer. Some answers say to embed it and others say to keep it slightly above the mud.

I was thinking of another option:

Has anyone tried RedGarding the bottom 8 inches or so of the CBU on all sides and once dried, THEN install it in the mud as recommended?

I don't see any negatives with pre-RedGarding and that might mitigate any wicking concerns.

Does anyone have any opinions on this?

Thanks for any input!

MD
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Old 09-15-2018, 05:27 PM   #2
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Welcome, MD.

From our Parent Site.

I would not recommend that. Fine to use your direct bonded waterproofing membrane on the face of your wallboard before you place your final mud bed, but don't put the membrane on the bottom edge of the board. Water will find its way into the CBU over time and it needs a way to exit at the bottom into the mud and finally to the drain.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 09-15-2018, 05:50 PM   #3
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There are two different classes of cbu:
- fiber cement boards (such as HardieBacker)
- 'real' cement boards (most of the others, but not all)

The TCNA guidelines list two methods, one for each of the two classes of cbu. A fiber-cement board should NOT be embedded.
A 'real' cement board CAN be embedded.

Read and follow the instructions for the brand you choose to install.
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Old 09-15-2018, 08:23 PM   #4
Davy
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Yep, what the others said. If you cover the bottom 8 inches then moisture will soak in above the Redgard, gravity will pull it down and it'll be trapped. If you're going to cover the CBU, cover the whole wall on the tile side only.
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Old 09-16-2018, 06:55 AM   #5
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Thanks for all the input, it's much appreciated.
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Old 09-23-2018, 07:48 AM   #6
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Shower Pan Electric Radiant Heat

Hello all,

I’m in the research\planning stage right now before beginning a smaller master bathroom remodel starting from the studs out.
I am planning on using an Electric Radiant Floor Heat Heating System with by Warming Systems...a typical continuous wire heat thats looped back and forth in the floor area where is desired.
I also plan on making a shower pan using mud (pre-slope mud, vinyl pan liner, then final mud).
How and where do I lay the heating cable in my shower pan?

I’ve asked some other professionals and I have received MANY different opinions…recently, I was even told to run the cable on the subfloor, cover with self-leveling underlayment, then build the shower pan, but DO NOT USE a vinyl membrane, use kerdi or noble. But I need to know how to do it with my planned mud shower pan.

How would you tackle this? And a bonus question, how do you run a contiguous heating cable from the bathroom floor through or over the curb?

I’d appreciate any input you might have.

Thanks,

M.D.
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Old 09-23-2018, 09:16 AM   #7
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I would switch to a company that supports a full shower system like laticrete or schluter. They have full specs and instructions on how to do this successfully. I havent used the warming systems brand so can't offer much there.
For Schluter they want
-pan packed
-ditra heat
-kerdi membrane
-tile

Laticrete
-pan packed
-liquid or sheet hydroban
-strataheat
-tile
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Old 10-10-2018, 08:36 AM   #8
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Toilet and Sink Placement

Looking to remodel our master bathroom. In my 1953 MBR tiny bathroom, the sink and toilet are against the same wall that is 54” wide. The current sink has a footprint of 30” and the toilet has a 24” footprint.
I see that code says the toilet has to be at least 15” on center from the left and right from objects. But there’s no way to that without using a smaller sink\vanity and LOSING precious countertop space (Which is already too little.)

Can I use the same footprints of 30” for the new sink and 24” for the new toilet? Is there such a thing as being grandfathered in since the bathroom was built in 1953?
What would you pros do in this situation?

Thank you for any input you might have.



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Old 10-10-2018, 08:53 AM   #9
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You have more than one bathroom project going, MD, or are all your current threads about this one?

The only person who can approve such a deviation would be your local code compliance office in the person of the inspector who will be inspecting your work. I would suggest you talk with that inspector before you commit to any such installation.

Keep in mind that grandfathering usually applies only if you have not changed the situation at hand. As soon as you alter the existing condition, you generally are required to bring it up to current code. The compliance official can waive that, or you will need to file a formal request for such a deviation and wait for approval, which may or may not be granted.

That's a pretty skinny placement for a WC, though. What if you gain a lotta weight when the project is completed?

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 10-10-2018, 09:37 AM   #10
mis_desk
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Thanks, CX.
Yes, this is the same bathroom I’m researching in all my posts.

Funny thing is that I am a big guy and it has never even dawned on me that my mbr toilet is 6” under normal width until I started researching and measuring.
I guess people in the 1950’s were much thinner!



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Old 10-10-2018, 10:00 AM   #11
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There is a certain modesty inherent in bathrooms from the 50s and 60s. I have three smaller bathrooms in my 1960s ranch rather than two large ones. I know well what you're describing.

Anyway, aside from the code issue, you could free up some countertop space by using a bowl sink. I went this route twice and really enjoy the additional space around the bowl. Every square inch counts! You could even mount your faucet in the wall above the sink to inch out more space. Lots of creative options for us small bathroom folks.

If you are willing to change the layout of your place, you might also considering adding on to your bathroom. I sacrificed a storage closet, and it has turned my tiny bathroom into a more reasonably sized one. You could also consider moving the plumbing. This is easier if you're not on a slab. But this all depends on the scope of your remodel and what you're willing to take on. There is always a creative solution. You just have to carefully identify it.
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Old 10-10-2018, 11:01 AM   #12
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Best to keep all your project questions on one thread so folks can see what you're working on and what's been previously asked and answered. A moderator can give it a more generic title any time you'd like to suggest one.
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Old 10-11-2018, 07:54 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CX
The only person who can approve such a deviation would be your local code compliance office in the person of the inspector who will be inspecting your work. I would suggest you talk with that inspector before you commit to any such installation.
Agreed... and the answer to your question about "grandfathering" will be based on what extent the code inspector thinks your work is new construction vs. replacement.

For example:
If you simply need to replace the toilet, you almost certainly wouldn't be required to bring your bathroom up to modern code.

If you want to replace the floor tile, the toilet, and the sink base... well that would be a bit for an "on the fence" kind of question.

If you are trying to relocate plumbing fixtures, you'll almost certainly be required to bring the room upto modern code.

But of course laws vary by jurisdiction, so these examples may or may not apply to you. You simply need to get in contact with your local code inspector and learn what changes require a permit, and when you'll have to bring things upto modern code.

{BTW: Example of how these generalizations can vary... I happen to know that in the jurisdiction I live in, I do not need a permit to replace a toilet or replace an electrical outlet... but I do need a permit to replace a window.}
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Old 10-13-2018, 09:45 AM   #14
mis_desk
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Mods,

Can you rename this thread to 1950's MBR Bathroom Remodel?
I'll have a lot more questions coming.

Thanks,

M.D.
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Old 10-13-2018, 05:40 PM   #15
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OFten, a simple remove and replace would qualify for being grandfathered. But, not always. The only way to know for sure is to both check local codes, and probably talk to the inspector. A major remodel will often trigger updating to the current codes.
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