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Unread 05-07-2011, 08:43 PM   #1
rjwz2
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First time bathroom renovation-Before and After Pics NOW!

Aloha, my name is Rob and this is my first post. I like doing DIY stuff around the house and I will be redoing my master bath next. I'm making new cabinet doors, putting in granite counter tops and floor tiles. My question is my old tub/shower is the one piece with the tub and encloser in fiberglass. I would like to put in a tub and then install tile up the surrounding walls. What do I need to install on the walls (bare studs I think behind the existing surround)? I know I need some kind of moisture barrier and cement board, etc. Which one goes where, like in what order. Do I need to tile all the way to the ceiling?

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Rob from the Big Island of Hawaii.
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Unread 05-07-2011, 09:15 PM   #2
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cement board on studs membrane on top, then tile.
you can go to the ceiling if you would like. for tub surrounds it normal to just go above the shower head

and welcome
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Unread 05-07-2011, 10:16 PM   #3
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Welcome, Rob.

You can either install a moisture barrier, polyethylene sheeting or roofing felt, which laps over your tub's tiling flange, behind your wall boards, or you can install your wall boards directly on the studs and then waterproof the inside with a sheet or liquid-applied direct bonded waterproofing membrane. The second is what I think Jeff is recommending.

Either will work just fine.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 05-08-2011, 04:53 PM   #4
rjwz2
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So the tile can go on the membrane? What is the membrane made of?

thanks,
Rob
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Unread 05-08-2011, 05:06 PM   #5
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Secret Stuff, Rob.

Tell us which one you wanna use and we'll tell you as much as the manufacturer will tell us. Or, of course, you can just visit their website and see most of the same information.

But mostly it's all Secret Stuff.

Anything that says on the packaging that it meets the standards of ANSI A118.10 (Load Bearing, Bonded Waterproof Membranes) is suitable.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Unread 05-08-2011, 05:12 PM   #6
jadnashua
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If you use a waterproof membrane, a couple of examples are RedGard (a paint-on) or Kerdi, a sheet membrane. Either is designed to accept thinset and to be tiled on directly. Or, you can use a moisture barrier on the studs, and tile directly to the cbu, as indicated. Since you are likely in an area with high humidity, I'd lean towards a surface membrane which limits how much can get damp, as the less that gets damp, the more likely it is to dry faster and be less susceptable to mildew.
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Unread 05-08-2011, 08:11 PM   #7
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I've had a couple of people tell me that they think going with tile all the way to the ceiling looks nicer than only part way up. And depending upon how many more rows of tile you need, it can be cheaper than topping off with bullnose tile, because in some places, the bullnose gets pretty expensive compared to another row of tile when you look at the cost in liner foot.
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Unread 02-03-2013, 01:58 AM   #8
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Durock or Hardiebacker?

I am planning to do a tub and shower surround with tile and was wondering if one of these was a good choice? Those are the 2 that I can get here. Is one better than the other? Is one easier to install?

Thanks,
Rob
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Unread 02-03-2013, 02:30 AM   #9
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They will both serve you well if properly installed. This question is something like a Chevy vs. Ford thing to some installers. The Durock is easier to get a wicked strong bond to. And the Hardie Backer Board is a little nicer/neater to work with when cutting. I prefer Durock myself, but the next pro may prefer Hardie. But both will work more than adequately. More important than which you choose is installing per directions.

Any other questions, you have? Can I ask you one in turn? Can I ask if you are planning on using either a moisture barrier behind the cement board or a surface applied waterproofing membrane to the front of it?

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Unread 02-03-2013, 03:25 AM   #10
rjwz2
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I'm planning on putting the moisture barrier behind, directly on the studs. Is this okay?

Thanks,
Rob
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Unread 02-03-2013, 10:30 AM   #11
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speaking of durock, can I get a clean cut with a simple box cutter on a 1/4" sheet?
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Unread 02-03-2013, 10:44 AM   #12
Donnie D.
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i prefer hardie.i worked with durarock for many years...

durarock--
--the corners can crumble easily
--they r heavy
--they r easy to drive a screw into
--they r less expensive than hardie

hardie--
--alittle more expensive
--harder to drive a screw thru
--nice and clean finish
--straight and square edges
--corners will not break as easily

make sure u use the proper screws for the backer u choose

also,a vapor barrie it ok,but the better way is no vaper barrier and apply a waterproof liquid membrane like regard,hydroban,hydro barrier
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Unread 02-03-2013, 10:45 AM   #13
Donnie D.
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pman no..the way to cut it is with a circular saw with a cement board blade..or a cardbine tipped backer board knife..alot harder with the knife tho
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Unread 02-03-2013, 12:53 PM   #14
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I have just used Schluter Kerdi Board for the first time and you might want to consider it. It is crazy expensive but it is fantastically easy and fun to work with. If you can afford the extra cost I am sure you will love it. This is not a commercial! Jim C.
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Unread 02-03-2013, 01:02 PM   #15
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Welcome back, Rob. This your master bath project from a couple years ago
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