Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Unread 04-05-2014, 12:47 AM   #1
El Jefe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Seattle
Posts: 76
Guess I'm going to remodel the bathroom

Hi - my child placed a wash cloth on our shower drain to fill it up. Now that the flood restoration company has finished drying up that mess, I'm contemplating renovating the bathroom myself. Partly for the experience; partly to save some money. Previous floor and shower were low grade materials (one-piece fiberglass shower insert and vinyl floors on particle board underlayment). I'm in the planning stages to build out a tile shower and floor, as well as replace the toilet and vanity counter-top (keep old cabinets, but paint them). So, basically the whole thing.

Just wanted to say hello. I'm sure I'll need some advice as I go! I have no tile experience, but I'm trying to soak up as much as I can here and elsewhere to decide how to tackle this. I may be a bit slow for a while on the updates, but I may post pictures here as I go along in order to draw on the forum's wisdom I appreciate any advice you may be able to offer.
__________________
Jeff
El Jefe is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Unread 04-05-2014, 04:06 AM   #2
Lump
Tile sales/installation central WI
 
Lump's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Marshfield, WI
Posts: 1,724
Best piece of advice I can give you is to get a detailed plan of attack together with all materials needed.

Once you have the price of all materials and it fits your budget then order everything so when you do tear out the old bathroom you aren't waiting on back ordered materials.

Good luck!
__________________
Brad L. Lenz

Success is a ladder that cannot be climbed with your hands in your pocket.

NTCA Proud Member
ICRI certified moisture technician
Lump is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-05-2014, 07:15 AM   #3
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 33,940
Hi Jeff, welcome. Yep, what Brad said. Also, give us more info about your project and your location. Is this on concrete slab or wood subfloor? Don't be afraid to ask questions and keep them all right here on this thread. There are many different approved installation methods for installing tile, figure out which method you want to go with. You will need materials for some that you won't need for others. For starters, I would read the "shower construction info" thread in the "liberry".
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-20-2014, 02:33 AM   #4
El Jefe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Seattle
Posts: 76
Underlayment questions - replace under vanity or leave it?

When we removed the particle board underlayment (had vinyl linoleum on it), we left the part of the boards directly beneath the vanity in hopes that we wouldn't have to move the cabinets. Is it ok to just leave that alone if I end up using something like Ditra for the rest of the bathroom to replace the old particle board? Or should we be pulling out the cabinets and making sure the underlayment is the same stuff from wall to wall? I'd prefer to not take the time move the cabinets out if it's an acceptable approach.

Also, on the same issue since we'll be putting tile down, should the tile go under the vanity as well (cover the entire floor with tile), or are we ok to go with our plan to fit the tile around the base of the vanity; joining the new underlayment with the old?

Also, where the heck can I find Ditra heat? Is it even sold online?
__________________
Jeff

Last edited by El Jefe; 04-20-2014 at 02:39 AM.
El Jefe is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-20-2014, 04:43 AM   #5
robrat
DIY GUY
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 31
Remove the Vanity, you'll want to rip out that crap to do the job right. Your house sounds like it was built like mine. Disconnect the plumbing from the sink, there will probably be 4 screws holding the top/sink to the cabinet at the corners, then probably 4-6 screws holding the vanity cabinet to the wall. They really ain't held in place by much.

Depending on how it was plumbed, you may have to shut the water off, and drain the system, then unscrew the valves from the stubs, before the cabinet will slide off. (advice - either hire a plumber or handyman if you're not comfortable doing this, OR jug some water, and start this project in the morning when the hardware stores are open in case you need a plumbing part asap if you're doing it yourself for the first time)
__________________
Rob
robrat is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-21-2014, 12:48 AM   #6
El Jefe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Seattle
Posts: 76
Thanks to Robrat. Two things are causing me some hesitation. First is the plumbing coming through the back of the cabinet (not wanting to remove the valves, etc. in order to pull the cabinets forward).

The other thing is that we ordered a new quartz countertop. It's taken them a few weeks just to get us scheduled, so now we don't want to push that off. Moving the cabinet will be much more difficult with the countertop intact.

I definitely don't want to do it the wrong way. Is it pretty common expectation that the new flooring tiles should be fully covering underneath the cabinet? If it's absolutely a no-no to tile around the vanity, then I'll pull the cabinets and do it wall to wall..
__________________
Jeff

Last edited by El Jefe; 04-21-2014 at 01:09 AM.
El Jefe is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-21-2014, 01:02 AM   #7
El Jefe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Seattle
Posts: 76
Wedi?

Another question. For a 3x5' shower with 8 foot ceiling, I was thinking of using the Wedi system simply because it looks easy and it's waterproof. However, the shower floor piece is several hundred dollars (available locally). I don't remember the exact price, but I think the whole system (including wall boards, Wedi sealant) is going to be something like $700-800. Is that ok? I've read up on the Kerdi solution as well, but I understand that it's expensive as well although maybe less than Wedi.

How much more does a Wedi system typically cost than a standard cement board and waterproofing sealer (pink/red goo stuff), and a traditional mud floor (or whatever the basic build would usually be)? How much could I potentially save by going with a traditional shower structure?
__________________
Jeff

Last edited by El Jefe; 04-21-2014 at 01:11 AM.
El Jefe is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-21-2014, 05:44 AM   #8
Davy
Moderator -- Mud Man
 
Davy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Princeton,Tx.- Dallas area
Posts: 33,940
I'm sure you could save some, maybe half. I'm not crazy about the Wedi shower floor pieces. In an odd shaped shower or one that doesn't have the drain centered, you may have to piece in a bunch of wedge shapes which looked like a joke in my opinion. I would go with the traditional shower bed myself but we also can guide you thru a Kerdi shower.
__________________
Davy

www.davystephenstile.com
Davy is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-22-2014, 04:02 PM   #9
CSW
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 1
Good luck! New here too and will be taking on the bathroom reno shortly. Great site, thanks in advance to all y'all contributors.
__________________
Sebby
CSW is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-22-2014, 07:47 PM   #10
jadnashua
Veteran DIYer- Schluterville Graduate

STAR Senior Contributor

 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 14,908
If you like the idea of waterproof foam panels, Schluter has KerdiBoard that can be used in place of the sheet membrane on the walls. One of the bigger costs in the shower kits is the pan, and with a bit of work, deckmud is LOTS cheaper, even if you build a prototype first and totally junk it (IOW, build two of them, one for practice). This is a confidence building exercise, and not required, but won't hurt even if you only practice one wall with the slope to the drain. It's like working with wet beach sand - pack it down, shape it...got a birdbath, throw a bit more on and continue, scrape off the high points. While the drain costs more, you might like the idea of a linear drain - then you can make your floor one flat plane, sloped to the drain rather than sloping from each edge to the middle, or use one of their sloped pans that come with Kerdi already installed on them.

(FWIW, all of the Schluter pans will eventually come with the Kerdi already attached - don't know when, but was told it will come.)
__________________
Jim DeBruycker
Not a pro, multiple Schluter Workshops (Schluterville and 2013 and 2014 at Schluter Headquarters), Mapei Training 2014, Laticrete Workshop 2014, Custom Building Products Workshop 2015, and Longtime Forum Participant.
jadnashua is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-25-2014, 06:29 PM   #11
melissadurante
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Queens NY
Posts: 90
I am by no means a tiling expert, though my father is a woodworker by trade..my brother and uncles carpenters and I am myself an electrician.

Not pulling out the vanity when the OP knows the subfloor is particle board (which probably got water logged from the flood caused by his child) sounds to me a bit shady. Also, ordering the countertop when the rest of the bathroom hasn't been gutted yet seems counter-intuitive.

I know the OP wants to save money....who doesn't. But a bathroom should last many years and should be done right the first time.
__________________
Melissa
melissadurante is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-26-2014, 01:49 AM   #12
Steve in Denver
Registered User
 
Steve in Denver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Mile High City
Posts: 910
Take your time and educate yourself up front. There are a lot of details to attend to, and it is critical that you know what those details are ahead of time so you can minimize those "oh shit" moments. Continually ask yourself if you are making assumptions, (hint: you are) and go find out the right answer before you start. It's not hard to do it right, but it's easy to do it wrong.

Plan out a schedule with reasonable detail and add 15% for padding. Then double it.

Plan out a budget, add 15% for padding and then add another 50%.

I'm not sure if I agree with ordering all the supplies up front...I guess it depends on the scope of the project, but I have been living for several months with faucets, tile, and a medicine cabinet (not to mention bins of plumbing and electrical parts, etc) in my dining room and my living room. If you have the room to stage all the stuff, procure it all up front, but if not you might consider ordering as you go.

I have seen designers suggest picking a "splurge item" and getting an upgrade for that (whatever you care about), but be careful. You get nice tile, and pretty soon everything else has to be nice so it doesn't look out of place...ask me how I know.

You will be well served to do some research and thinking, and post a basic plan here...you will get quality feedback (not always what you want to hear) from the guys who do this work for a living.

Pictures are always a big help.
__________________
Steve
Steve in Denver is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-26-2014, 04:47 PM   #13
El Jefe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Seattle
Posts: 76
Thanks for the advice. I have decided to move the vanity and redo the whole floor. I wasn't meaning to sound shady. The floor around the vanity was spared from the water damage, so I don't think it's damaged, but I do want to do it right. I'm trying to learn as much as I can, and it's taking forever.

We ordered the countertop because a person at a tile store suggested we pick our counter before the tile. We don't know what the right order is. That's half the struggle is knowing whet to start.

Here's my order I'm planning:
- paint cabinets (I have a sprayer, so I'm just doing this while there's no tile or shower to protect.
- move cabinets out and pull up remaining particle board
- cut out section of subfloor. Move plumbing for new shower if needed. Replace subfloor. I'll explain this decision below.
- build shower (maybe hire a pro) including frameless glass doors (hire pro)
- run dedicated circuit to bathroom (hire a pro)
- tile floor with heat - would like to use ditra heat if I can find some
- install toilet
- replace the cabinets
- add countertop and new sinks and faucets (pro install counter and sinks)
- paint walls and replace trim
- add backsplash tile of some kind - maybe the mosaic square style
- replace lighting fixtures and old medicine cabinet
- relax


So, the subfloor had to be cut into in order to dry the joists (worked out better than opening a ceiling downstairs. When done, they screwed the subfloor pieces back into place, but I feel like it's compromised and may result in some deflection problems. So I'm planning to remove a larger piece (4x4') and replace with new osb. Doing this will also give me the chance to move the shower drin plumbing as well, but I haven't decided if I should just keep the same dimensions and avoid the hassle.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Jeff
El Jefe is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-26-2014, 04:54 PM   #14
El Jefe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Seattle
Posts: 76
Here's another picture of the subfloor where there's a 1ft x 8in piece that's been screwed back in. It does go from joist to joist but I can tell it flexes slightly if I step directly in the middle of it. The larger section that was pulled up (on right) is about 1ft x 4ft. So, I figured I'd just pull both pieces up, cut out a larger section (4x4 or so) and put in a new board. I've never done this so if there's anything I should know, please help. I watched a YouTube video, so I figure it can't be that hard
__________________
Jeff
El Jefe is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 04-26-2014, 04:56 PM   #15
El Jefe
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Seattle
Posts: 76
Picture of floor
Attached Images
 
__________________
Jeff
El Jefe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com   National Gypsum Permabase


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First tile and remodel project - 9x12 bathroom remodel and 6x6 sauna kyle242gt Tile Forum/Advice Board 17 08-25-2011 08:42 AM
I guess anyone can do tile. Kx250 Professionals' Hangout 17 12-17-2006 09:58 PM
Well I guess, I just don't know. Otis The Mud Box 0 09-25-2005 09:26 PM
guess what i got opiethetileman The Mud Box 5 01-10-2005 04:05 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:08 PM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2018 John Bridge & Associates, LLC