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-   -   Wood cutting with an electric miter saw (https://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=124287)

Shady at Best 12-13-2017 09:57 PM

Wood cutting with an electric miter saw
 
I have always wondered this and thought about it again today so i figured i would ask the pros.

When cutting a bevel in wood with an electric saw. Why does the bevel cut take longer to cut. It seems that its a tougher cut for the saw. I realize that the material becomes thicker when cut this way but i am pretty sure the thickness to time ratio doesnt jive up.
Another issue is the blade smoking whilst cutting at an angle. Even when the blade is brand new.

Anyone have any thoughts on this? I suppose i could goggle it but that isn't any fun.


Travis, that is a very good idea!

cx 12-13-2017 10:10 PM

This cutting being done with a hand-held circular saw, Travis?

Gozo 12-14-2017 06:48 AM

The smoking when cutting usually has to do either with the wood being pinched and twisted by the torque of the blade against the line of travel. Almost a given with a hand held circular saw doing a bevel. If using a compound miter saw and the work piece is clamped in well and the saw pivots are not loose, it may be because of the blade type. The gullet has to get the sawdust out of the cut before the next tooth gets in there. Some blades (coarse) are designed to move material faster and some slower. The right blade at the right speed kind of thing. Also if youíre making a plunge bevel cut the blade is cutting a longer section of wood than if youíre making a sliding bevel, though the plunge is for a shorter travel distance through than the slide cut. Smoking usually tells me Iím not doing something right (or maybe just a sappy piece of wood).

Tool Guy - Kg 12-15-2017 12:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shady at Best
When cutting a bevel in wood with an electric saw. Why does the bevel cut take longer to cut. It seems that its a tougher cut for the saw. I realize that the material becomes thicker when cut this way but i am pretty sure the thickness to time ratio doesnt jive up.

Technically, that's incorrect, but you're not far off. Increasing the amount of wood that needs to be cut is indeed tougher on the motor. However, it's probably the teeth of the blade that's a far bigger component to what you are objecting to. The limitation of each tooth's cutting ability and how fast the sawdust can be extracted is probably the "feedback" you're detecting in terms of cut speed and motor bog-down. Like Jeff mentioned, the type of tooth configuration plays a big part in cutting performance. I can think of several, but three common blades you'll find at many box stores are: "alternate top bevel", "triple chip", and "combination". But that's not all. The tooth hook angle, how big each gullet it, the clearance angle, how wide of a kerf is being cut......I could go on, but it would be boring. Point is, each of these variables come with certain pros and cons. Some blades cut fast, some slow, some straight, some slightly wavy. First, pick out your blade configuration based on what you want to cut and the tool doing the cutting (like miter saw or table saw). Then tweak it even more by selecting tooth geometry and gullet size to match the material and the type of cut you want to make. Are you cutting hardwood or softwood? Wet or dry?

One problem when we go to the box store is that the selection of blades is either limited, or it's not clear what to buy. The folks in the aprons are typically under-trained and can't help. And to top it off, most box stores attempt to "be everything for everyone", so they stock the shelves with blades that are "all around" blades that will sort of cut everything you throw at them....but with mediocre results. Most folks neither know nor care and are perfectly happy with a $15 "all around" blade. There's a few specialty blades at the box stores, but it might not be easy to decipher them.

If you tell us specifically what wood you are cutting, what tool is doing the cutting, and what type of cuts you wanna make, we can make more specific blade suggestions.




Quote:

Originally Posted by Shady at Best
Another issue is the blade smoking whilst cutting at an angle. Even when the blade is brand new.

Same thing. It's the type of blade versus the type of material being cut. The fact that it's smoking tells you that excessive heat is being generated at the tip or binding with the blade. The fact that it's new and it's smoking tells you that the blade is either not properly sharp or that the configuration is not suited to this particular cutting. Tell us what you're cutting and and what blade you're using.

:)

Shady at Best 12-15-2017 03:53 PM

Cutting being done with a compound miter saw. Didn't realize this got some replies. Reading through them now.
I want to mention that the saws in question have not been sliding miter saws. Thinking about it in comparison to a sliding compound miter, I think I know the answer.

Travis, that is a very good idea!

Shady at Best 12-15-2017 04:02 PM

Read through the replies. I mainly use the saw for finish work. 12 inch blade, 90 something teeth.
I think it's the materiel being pulled sideways across the deck of the saw and the teeth not being able to clear the materiel.
As we know a stationary saw starts the cut at the center of the material whereas a sliding saw will start from the edge and has a better ability to clear material

Travis, that is a very good idea!

Tool Guy - Kg 12-15-2017 10:55 PM

With finishing work being done on a pivoting miter saw, the blade not cutting dead straight is one of the bigger concerns. Especially on wood wider than 2.5-3” or so. And especially with that many teeth. While so many teeth will usually leave a nice smooth cut on the wood, I’m guessing it’s too many with too little chance for sawdust to be extracted. Do you know if it’s an alternate top bevel grind?

:)

Shady at Best 12-16-2017 12:56 AM

Its a diablo blade from homers.

Travis, that is a very good idea!

Tool Guy - Kg 12-16-2017 11:58 AM

Diablo is just a brand. Can you get more specific?

:)

Kman 12-16-2017 08:23 PM

El Diablo. :devil:

Shady at Best 12-27-2017 02:42 AM

12 inch 96 tooth blade. Red. Little squiggly laser cut lines in it, white writing.


Travis, that is a very good idea!

John Bridge 12-27-2017 09:13 AM

Too many teeth. I run 64 on my compound miter saw 12 in. Cut your miters vertically, not horizontally. :)

davem 12-27-2017 10:31 AM

The farther you lay the miter saw down, the more it becomes like a rip cut instead of tearing the fibers at 90 degrees in it's vertical orientation.

wwhitney 12-27-2017 01:01 PM

I think the blade/wood fiber geometry is determined by the cut itself (miter versus cross-cut) not by how you effect that cut on the saw. The only difference I see between making the cut with the workpiece flat and the saw tilted to bevel, versus making the cut with the board upright and the saw rotated to miter is that in the former case gravity wants to pull the saw head off the desired cut plane somewhat. Perhaps that is enough to cause trouble, I do find myself preferring to keep the blade vertical whenever I can.

Cheers, Wayne

Grasshopper 12-27-2017 05:19 PM

The path through the wood is longer and the blade isn't clearing the dust as well as a straight cut. My guess, anyway.


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