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-   -   Contractor walked off the job (https://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=115235)

Custom Builder 01-14-2015 02:37 PM

What in the heck do you do for that nearly 1 1/2" threshold from bedroom carpet to bath tile/travertine? That'll look like cold dog turds no matter what you do. I'd use porcelain and ditra to bring that step down.

Sorry about your predicament, lots of good discussion here though.

by-eye 01-14-2015 04:35 PM

Scott, I'm curious, are you are coating all of the hardi cbu with red guard, or just the seams/fasteners like it was originally done?

SWB04 01-14-2015 08:16 PM

6 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by KMAN
"You took his advice again? "

Passive resistance, and hey, he could get it right eventually. Anything is possible. :D

(Actually, I'm not a "politically correct" guy, and genuinely "colorblind" in regards to race, but I knew that as soon as I described the guy helping us out, someone out there would take exception. I care about a person's heart, not the packaging.)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Custom Builder
"What in the heck do you do for that nearly 1 1/2" threshold from bedroom carpet to bath tile/travertine? That'll look like cold dog turds no matter what you do. I'd use porcelain and ditra to bring that step down."

I was thinking along the lines of a trampoline. Big "wake up" everytime I head to the showers. :D

Actually, I compared the pre-travertine sub-floor (i.e plywood + CBU), and it was pretty much plum with the adjacent thick carpeting and pad. I've got a thick (maybe 6+ ") transition between the carpet and entry of the bathroom (i.e. no door on this 1990's puppy; au natural!). My transition problem will be that 3/4" of travertine and mortar, and I'll either buy a commercially made transition strip or make one out of layered strips of 1/4" plywood.

I'll do the same thing in the closet, and if it feels like I'm falling off the edge of the world when I go in the closet to get my shorts, worst case, I'll pull up the closet carpeting, install another layer of cheap OSB, and the closet will match the bathroom.

Not a perfect solution, but should be workable.

Quote:

Originally Posted by by-eye
"Scott, I'm curious, are you are coating all of the hardi cbu with red guard, or just the seams/fasteners like it was originally done? "

See pix. They'll be adding the second coat of Redgard on the shower walls down to the shower tub tomorrow, along with a few more pieces (i.e. transition strip along the closet door, etc.). Should be "zipped" tight in red.

Thanks, guys.

SWB04 01-19-2015 11:38 PM

Master Bath/Shower remodel; Glass door questions
 
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My master bath remodel/Travertine installation is about done. The installers will be grouting tomorrow, and resolving a plumbing issue (original contractor failed to install shower faucet plumb to the wall). I'll post pictures down the line (because you guys will always ask :) ), but attached is a construction picture to give you an idea of how the door would fit. (Technical note: the shower enclosure shown was modified substantially since this picture to correct mistakes made by the original contractor).

The shower is a basic 42" x 42" shower (travertine walls are 52" x 52"), with 80" high walls, adjoining a bath tub. The glass will be an "L" shaped, with one side resting on the tub surround, and the other side supporting a 30" door (mounted into the wall at left) and 12" fixed wall (attached to the tub side at right).

I'm ordering the shower doors now, and have targeted clear, frameless doors (3/8" or 1/2" thick). I've reviewed notes on the forum about installers penetrating the shower tub (especially the curb) with fasteners, and will be alert to that. My preference would be to have the door open from the left (i.e. hinge on the bath tub side), but from what I've read, a frameless shower door must be wall mounted. I have studs installed on both walls to support both fixed mount points.

So, my question is, does anyone have any tips to offer on shower doors, from glass and features to installation? I've done just about everything involved with renovating a house, but I haven't ordered or installed a shower door yet.

Thanks.

cpad007 01-19-2015 11:50 PM

I just had our frameless shower doors installed earlier today, Scott. Ours is L-shaped as well, with the door mounted through the tile into the wall. There are no penetrations of the curb and the glass installer had no problem with that.

We ordered 1/2" glass as it just has a heavier more substantial feel and look to it but it does cost a lot more...but it does look much better IMO. We also ordered a "clear" type of glass that doesn't have a greenish tint to it. That added cost. We also had a clear coat sprayed/adhered to it to help miminize water spots, etc. That added cost. Finally, we had a special s-curve handle and the glass was cut at the opening to match the s-curve. THAT added cost, too.

I'll take pics of my shower glass in a couple of days as it is taped up right now with the silicone curing but there is a picture of it from the glass company's showroom in my thread somewhere.

We paid $2.8k for everything including installation. That took a little over 2 hours this morning.

SWB04 01-22-2015 12:10 PM

Shower/Voids behind tiles - How much of a problem is this?
 
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Hi Folks,

The second contractor just completed the bathroom travertine installation. They pulled a tile at my direction to raise the shower head location 6", and this is what I found (see picture). How much of a problem is this, and what do you recommend I do now?

I've been concerned with voids I saw at the edges of the installed tiles throughout the installation. When I installed travertine, I floated 1/2" of mortar and back-buttered perhaps 1/4" of mortar as well. The result was messy - lots of excess mortar coming out the sides, and setting the tiles took a lot of time. I watched this guy install by only filling holes in the back of the tile, putting down a 1/2" notch on the floor (more at some points, to fix uneven spots in the sub-floor), twisted and then set the tile. He'd work set four tiles, then add spacers and level the tiles. His method was much quicker and less messy, but it seemed to leave voids at the edges. He may have filled these when setting the next tile, but I confess I wasn't watching him enough to be sure. The 18"x18" tile we pulled had good coverage (and took a fair amount of chiseling to remove).

Bottom line is, all tiles tested with a "tap" test seem solid, but I found this void (saw blade demonstates that it continues all the way to the CBU). I'm concerned that water will gather behind the wall, and in particular, in the shower niche, that at best the tile will remain wet and grow mold, or at worse, the water eventually damages the mortar or penetrates the wall.

Is this kind of variance in the mortar filling within standards, or am I being too picky here? What should I do now?

Thanks again.

cx 01-22-2015 12:37 PM

Scott, best to keep all your project questions on one thread so folks can see what you're working on and what's been previously asked and answered.

Best I can tell you've never determined that there is any moisture barrier behind your wallboard and that niche appears to be one of the few places with a waterproofing membrane applied, albeit a bit thinly and not high enough to be really effective.

But if the bottom of the niche is properly sloped to drain and the waterproofing membrane is at least intact there, the hole you show behind the niche tiles should not cause you serious problems. The gap shouldn't exist at all as the area behind that tile should have been at least 95 percent filled with the tile bonding mortar. The gap is something you wish weren't there and you could have lingering moisture in there and maybe keep your stone darkened in that area or allow mold growth on any organic matter that could possibly get in there over the years, I suppose, but you've got far greater problems with your shower than that, eh?

My opinion; worth price charged.

SWB04 01-22-2015 03:26 PM

5 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by cx
Scott, best to keep all your project questions on one thread so folks can see what you're working on and what's been previously asked and answered.

I included a link to the first thread for context, and created a new thread since this addressed a specific technical question unrelated to the subject of the first thread. However, I will comply with the forum's standards.

Quote:

Originally Posted by cx
Best I can tell you've never determined that there is any moisture barrier behind your wallboard and that niche appears to be one of the few places with a waterproofing membrane applied, albeit a bit thinly and not high enough to be really effective.

There is a paper backing of some sort; can't be a moisture barrier. The new contractor applied two coats of Redgard, diagonally and then horizontally, to every place that travertine was installed, including the floor as a secondary barrier. The primary barrier was 1/4" (floors) or 1/2" (walls) Hardie CBU, and a quality hot mop job took care of the shower tub. The only area that didn't get CBU was the six inch strip at the top of the shower; that only has Redgard over the existing wallboard.

The Hardi backer ends about an 1.5" above the existing shower spout (if you look at the close up, you can see the horizontal line), and above that there is standard, 23 year old drywall. (I directed the new contractor to apply Redgard to the drywall, and mount the travertine over the top of it. That area is 78" above the shower tub; thought it would be adequate water control.

That's a problem now. When we raise the outlet six inches higher, it'll be mounted through the drywall. We're going to block the back of the existing CBU with a 4" x 4" square covering the existing shower spout hole, mounted from the back with polyurethane glue and a 3/4" plywood backing, and secured from the front with CBU screws. We'll tape and apply thinset over the area as with any other CBU seam. Then we'll clean additional mortar off the section where the tile was pulled, recoat the area with two coats of Redgard, and the area should be water tight. I'll caulk in around the new hole for the water outlet, though I guess the outer mounting plate should keep the water out).

I'd prefer to replace the 6" strip of drywall with Hardi CBU, but I don't want to disturb the rest of the installation. I can't get to the stud on the left (i.e. hardie + travertine already covers it) to secure the CBU. I'd have to block behind the hardie on the left and attach the CBU to a stud on the right, to secure new CBU to cover the 6" area where the shower spout will mount. I'm hoping that just applying Redgard over the CBU and wallboard will be sufficient.

Quote:

Originally Posted by cx
But if the bottom of the niche is properly sloped to drain and the waterproofing membrane is at least intact there, the hole you show behind the niche tiles should not cause you serious problems.

There are two 3/4" solid travertine shelves that the crew made from counter top remnants they had at their shop (worked out really well). The shelves are sloped, though I suspect the slope was achived via mortar bed - the niche was a square box before tiling.

Quote:

Originally Posted by cx
The gap shouldn't exist at all as the area behind that tile should have been at least 95 percent filled with the tile bonding mortar. The gap is something you wish weren't there and you could have lingering moisture in there and maybe keep your stone darkened in that area or allow mold growth on any organic matter that could possibly get in there over the years, I suppose, but you've got far greater problems with your shower than that, eh?

Honestly, what I observed during the installation likely met the 95 percent standard. The problem is that my standard is 125% filled (if I can't play in mud, get it all over everything and myself, then I'm just not happy). :-D

I guess I'll just ask them to fill the void as best they can, and put the tile back up after we prepare the wall.
a
Regarding the "you've got far greater problems with your shower than that, eh?" I think we've resolved the major issues (though I just created this one by the late change request, i.e. I'm paying them for the additional work).

This isn't a "10" on a ten point scale at all, but judging from where we started, and the work these guys picked up, I believe that they did a pretty good job.

Thanks for taking the time to respond.


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