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winginit
12-01-2009, 04:28 PM
Hello all. First time poster. First tile job too. Would like to say thanks to all who contribute here, I have learned alot from you already :)

Now for my dilema...

I was reckless when I tore out the existing materials and have left myself a squirly little corner. Both the existing drywall(painted and textured), and the new cbu come up short of the respective corner where they would meet. this has left me a tricky little gap that I'm not sure what to do with.

(please view the attachments)

What should I do here?
remove/replace existing drywall for a better fit?
remove replace cbu for same reason?
build out drywall?
mud and tape with thinset or joint compound?

my concern with the latter two options is the lack of something in the gap to back the mud or thinset, along with issues of the material adhering.

should I scab?

none of the above?

Sorry for the long post. I'm not a photographer, and my piant skills are lacking so I hope the attachments are clear enough.Any input is greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

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Houston Remodeler
12-01-2009, 04:34 PM
What is above the ceiling drywall? Can you throw a 2x4 up there to give it backing? I would think the tile may come out far enough from the side wall to hide the gap, but you'll need something above the ceiling drywall anyway to keep it from sagging. If you can't fit in a little piece of drywall you can A- fill it with 20 minute mud or 2- cut a larger piece of drywall out of the ceiling and put in a new even larger piece of drywall, but then you'll have to re-texture to match.

bathroomremodeler
12-01-2009, 05:00 PM
Aaron,

We also want to see a moisture barrier behind the CBU (on the walls). The moisture barrier should cover the tub lip. Simply put, when you put on the moisture barrier ... you should be able to take a quick shower and all of the water end up in the tub.

I see something hanging in one of your pics. Just making sure it is a moisture barrier.

winginit
12-01-2009, 06:32 PM
First off, thanks for the replies. In response...

Aaron,

We also want to see a moisture barrier behind the CBU (on the walls). The moisture barrier should cover the tub lip. Simply put, when you put on the moisture barrier ... you should be able to take a quick shower and all of the water end up in the tub.

I see something hanging in one of your pics. Just making sure it is a moisture barrier.

yup you spotted it. 6mil poly.

What is above the ceiling drywall? Can you throw a 2x4 up there to give it backing? I would think the tile may come out far enough from the side wall to hide the gap, but you'll need something above the ceiling drywall anyway to keep it from sagging. If you can't fit in a little piece of drywall you can A- fill it with 20 minute mud or 2- cut a larger piece of drywall out of the ceiling and put in a new even larger piece of drywall, but then you'll have to re-texture to match.

Well, I'm feeling kind of silly. It had totally slipped my mind that I have acess to above this area. Went up and took a look...

The drywall edge is fully supported along the long wall(rear wall), and fastened into ceiling joists at 24"o.c. along the head and toe walls.

I can scab something in there, thats no prob, But should I scab above and fill from below, or scab from below, fill from above and then remove scab?

Then it's just a question of what to fill with. The gap is larger on the backside of the drywall(I cut it away at an angle). What would work for the purpose of filling this? 20 minute mud as previously suggested? or something else? It will need to be able to accept texture and paint.

Thanks

cx
12-01-2009, 06:42 PM
Welcome, Aaron. :)

Is your ceiling board still firmly attached to the joist?

If your drawing is accurate, your tile should cover that ceiling gap, and the gap at the top of the CBU, and you'll caulk the tile/ceiling joint and won't nobody never know nor care that there's a gap back there.

If it bothers you, pewt some thinset mortar or setting-type drywall mud in there very carefully so's not to mess up the ceiling texture.

My opinion; worth price charged.

Houston Remodeler
12-01-2009, 06:47 PM
Or you can use some expanding foam in a can to do the same job and insulate at the same time.

winginit
12-01-2009, 06:59 PM
cx Welcome, Aaron.

Is your ceiling board still firmly attached to the joist?

If your drawing is accurate, your tile should cover that ceiling gap, and the gap at the top of the CBU, and you'll caulk the tile/ceiling joint and won't nobody never know nor care that there's a gap back there.

If it bothers you, pewt some thinset mortar or setting-type drywall mud in there very carefully so's not to mess up the ceiling texture.

My opinion; worth price charged.


What cx said

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Or you can use some expanding foam in a can to do the same job and insulate at the same time.
__________________
Paul

Awesome. Thank you! More questions coming soon.

winginit
12-01-2009, 08:38 PM
is the cbu/drywall joint at the ceiling supposed to be treated like the other cbu joints(taped with alkali resistant tape and mudded with thinset)?

or

do I leave it as is and the gap gets covered with tile and caulked at the ceiling?

thanks

Houston Remodeler
12-01-2009, 08:48 PM
As long as the drywall is properly supported, you can go with caulk and paint over it.

winginit
12-03-2009, 04:27 PM
soooo, I hung my cbu before I found literature about sealing the moisture barrier to the tub flange. Where should I go from here? Is all lost, or should I just carry on? Run a bead of silicone between cbu and tub flange? Nothing? I'm not sure what best course would be. moisture barrier is 6mil poly if it makes a difference.

thanks

cx
12-03-2009, 05:03 PM
Aaron, it's not at all necessary that the moisture barrier be attached in any way to the tub's tiling flange.

It is quite necessary that the moisture barrier be lapped over the tiling flange to direct any moisture into the tub.

You got that?

My opinion worth price charged.

winginit
12-03-2009, 09:11 PM
whew! ok :) Thanks CX. I do have it overlapping, in fact I haven't trimmed it yet, so it hangs down into the tub a few inches and kind of acts as a tub protector. I figured I'd trim it off once I finished the cbu. gotta mud my seams then it will get the blade.

out of curriosity...

If the space between tub and bottom row of tile gets caulked(standard procedure right?), how does moisture escape from barrier back to tub?

thanks

Houston Remodeler
12-03-2009, 09:19 PM
Aaron,

You have asked one of the most debated questions here on the forum. There is the grout-it camp and the caulk-it camp. The grout camp says to use grout as it lets out any moisture that gets behind the tiles. The caulk camp says there is too much expansion and contraction between the tub and tiles, the grout will crack so use 100% silicone so it will have a permanent flexible mold free seal. The grout camp says the silicone will trap moisture. The silicone camp says so does the grout sealant. Then we glare at each other for a while.

In either event, the waterproof layer is not the grout or the caulk.

Your choice.

Choose wisely grasshopper.

winginit
12-03-2009, 09:26 PM
:rofl: Lol. Thanks Paul. That is kind of what I had picked up on. You can see how one might be confused? Well, I guess I will need to think this over. Thanks for the clear, un-biast explanation, as it is greatly appreciated.