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VelvetFoot
03-07-2007, 08:42 AM
I want to reinstall a toilet on marble tile. I've read on the directions of plumbers putty not to use on marble because of staining. Doesn't the edge of a toilet usually get a rope of plumbers putty on it to help with setting the toilet on an unflexible and likely not totally level as well as smooth surface? Should I substitute a thick bead of white silicone caulk (tiles are white).

Thanks much.

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statjunk
03-07-2007, 08:55 AM
I've installed lots of toilets and never used plumbers puddy before. I usually seal with caulk. Not saying you don't but I've never seen it before.

Tom

thydroc
03-07-2007, 09:00 AM
Don't put Plumbers Putty on the marble, the oils in the putty will leach into the marble and stain it. Caulk is usually used for the Toilet to Floor interface.

VelvetFoot
03-07-2007, 09:04 AM
Thanks guys. I will put a thick bead of silicone on the edge before I set it down.

Shaughnn
03-07-2007, 09:14 AM
Velvet,
You can buy plastic shims at any place that sells plumbing supplies and use those to level up your commode. Apply silicone in a continuous bead from the back corner, around the front and to the other back corner. Leave the rear (unseen) area of the toilet base unsealed so that in the event of a leak, you'll have ample warning instead of the moisture reaping havoc unseen in your subfloor.
Best of luck,
Shaughnn
PS: Plumber's Putty remains pliable and isn't suitable for setting toilets. A wax ring, preferably with a neoprene horn, should be used to seal the closet flange and caulking applied to the base.

statjunk
03-07-2007, 03:40 PM
Shaughnn,

Great tip.

Thanks

Tom

sandbagger
03-07-2007, 09:16 PM
tom - what Shaughnn said about the shims and caulk. It's important to have the toilet level and steady BEFORE your caulk. Don't expect the caulk to fix a rocking toilet. It will for awhile, but eventually the stress will prolly break the caulk bead. And test fit the shims and everything before you install the wax ring. :nod:

BigCraig
03-07-2007, 09:55 PM
Today, 10:14 AM #5
Shaughnn
Moderator -- Union Tile Setter




Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Renton, Washin'ton
Posts: 6,110 Velvet,
You can buy plastic shims at any place that sells plumbing supplies and use those to level up your commode. Apply silicone in a continuous bead from the back corner, around the front and to the other back corner. Leave the rear (unseen) area of the toilet basLeave the rear (unseen) area of the toilet e unsealed so that in the event of a leak, you'll have ample warning instead of the moisture reaping havoc unseen in your subfloor.
Best of luck,
Shaughnn
PS: Plumber's Putty remains pliable and isn't suitable for setting toilets. A wax ring, preferably with a neoprene horn, should be used to seal the closet flange and caulking applied to the base.
__________________
Capua Custom Tile & Stone, Seattle
Member of Master Builders Association of King and Snohomish Counties
Member of Bricklayers & Allied Craftworkers Local #1, WA


I believe many rear areas should remain unseen, especially mine :nod:

Tool Guy - Kg
03-07-2007, 10:53 PM
Decades ago, toilets used to be set with plumbers putty all the time around these parts. But it's hard to argue with beeswax rings that work great.....and for under a buck. :)


I agree with the plastic shims to steady a rocking toilet, the silicone to cover up the shims and make it look good, and the wax ring for setting the toilet. But I'd use a plain wax ring and advise against the type that has an inner plastic ring to guide the waste into the drain. Why? Because the plastic ring's smaller diameter means more splashing of the waste as it passes and is more likely to exacerbate water damage if the wax ring isn't sealed 100% to the bottom of the toilet. :)

Terry Love
03-08-2007, 01:13 PM
Not all toilets need shimming, but for those that do,
We prefer to pin the front of the bowl to the floor, by shimming at the back.

Setting the bowl down without the wax first is a way to determine whether it's really the bowl that needs shimming or if the wax is holding it up.

We like the composite door shims sold in hardware stores, water resistent and they snap off cleanly.

Against tile floors, we tend to use the clear more. PolySeamSeal is a good choice, leaving a bit out at the back in case the seal goes bad.

If the flange is lower than the floor, you will need more than one wax ring.
I've pulled too many toilets that had leaked because only one wax ring had been used.
The wax ring goes on the floor, not on the bowl.
The last thing you need is for the wax ring to drop off while you are positioning the bowl over the flange, and partally block the drain.

cx
03-08-2007, 01:20 PM
We like the composite door shims sold in hardware stores, water resistent and they snap off cleanly.Why, Terry, I would expect a man of your long experience to favor pieces of lead from the drain. :)

Terry Love
03-08-2007, 01:50 PM
Lead from the drain?
Hey! I'm not that old!

That was before my time.

cx
03-08-2007, 02:05 PM
Old? :scratch:

I just set a new lead riser inna slab a couple months ago. Haven't even cut it off yet. Figgered alla you seasoned plumbers still used'em. :)

Terry Love
03-08-2007, 02:12 PM
It just shows how differnet every area is.
This week I'm in Guatemala, it's very different here too.

Not everybody here has hot water in the shower, or hot water for the lav faucets.
The place I'm staying at now have bidets though.

When I went to Ace Hardware in the mall, they didn't carry toilet seats.
You could buy a toilet, but no seat for it.

Dave Taylor
03-08-2007, 02:20 PM
Mr. Love says.... The place I'm staying at now have bidets
Prolly nuttin' worse than a cold bidet in the morning. :---)

Jeeeze... now if'n' Mr. B and ol' Tile Ranger showed up we would have a medium to high level type thread going here :---) :sheep:

PS: I forgot..... ol' enjuneeer Bob C likes to shim hie terlit' with pocket change.

cx
03-08-2007, 02:24 PM
Yep, we certainly see those regional differences in all phases of residential construction, Terry. It's difficult sometimes to even clarify what some of the terms mean in different locales.

Here (South Texas) you can go to any Homer's and buy a brass solder-on flange for a lead terlit drain, but you ain't gonna find you no lead terlit drain there. :shrug:

And you're certainly correct that some of the biggest differences can be seen in forign countries with completely different backgrounds and customs, such as California. :D



Tile Ranger? What's the Tile Ranger care about terlits, Dave? :scratch: