Shower subfloor not even - Solutions?? [Archive] - Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

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afriendofcheese
02-22-2017, 06:01 PM
Upon removal of the tub, I noticed the subfloor bows in the middle. I am not sure if it's entirely obvious in the picture, but from the back of the wall, there is an incline of ~1/2" - 3/4" to the middle, then it slopes back down towards the drain.

The subfloor is sturdy enough where it does not need to be replaced.
Should I:

a) use self-leveling underlayment, then lay the tar paper/mesh/deck mud as if the subfloor were flat.

b) proceed as normal by laying tar paper, mesh, then deck mud, but instead of sloping it 1/4" per foot from the drain, account for the highest point of the subfloor and bring the edges up significantly higher than I normally would and slope from there.

c) tar paper or plywood shims

d)??

Thanks for any help.

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Houston Remodeler
02-22-2017, 06:55 PM
Steve,

Um B? :scratch:

Normal floors are uneven which makes mudded pans a life saver. If you were fixin to have a curb, just raise the perimeter of the shower floor a smidge to accomodate the high spot in the framing

afriendofcheese
02-22-2017, 07:38 PM
Um B?

Normal floors are uneven which makes mudded pans a life saver. If you were fixin to have a curb, just raise the perimeter of the shower floor a smidge to accomodate the high spot in the framing

Well the reason I thought this may not be a good solution is because of the drain position relative to the sides and back. In order to compensate for the high spot, the slope would be pretty dramatic in order to keep all the edges level. The edges to the side and back of the drain will have mud 2" or maybe even more higher than the drain (at least 2" of pre-slope and 2" of top layer) . The drain is as close as 10" from the back of the wall and 14" from either side. Is sloping from 2" above the drain just 10" away not too steep of a slope?

Carbidetooth
02-22-2017, 08:01 PM
d. move drain to center

e. install linear drain

I'd investigate why the hump to satisfy curiosity. Perhaps can be rectified.

afriendofcheese
02-22-2017, 08:54 PM
I'd investigate why the hump to satisfy curiosity. Perhaps can be rectified.

I'm very glad you said this because really, I should have just thought of that at the very beginning. The red beam you see overhead in the picture (which runs perpendicular to another beam) is where the hump occurs.

My instinct says that adjustable steel column needs to be lowered in order to even out the floor, but I don't love the idea of lowering this beam underneath 3 floors of condo units.

Where to go from here..structural engineer?

Carbidetooth
02-23-2017, 01:23 AM
With dissimilar framing materials like that, it's certainly possible that everything was once in plane. Most likely culprit is shrinkage of the lumber.

You could have an engineer look but my gut tells me you'd create as many problems as you'd solve.

Is that girder preventing drain from being moved closer to center?

HS345
02-23-2017, 06:28 AM
When you pack a mud base, you make a level perimeter, and slope to the drain from there. Not sure I understand the problem. Self leveling would be wholly unnecessary.

John Bridge
02-23-2017, 08:16 AM
Yeah, I don't understand, either. I don't see a problem if you're going to do a mud floor. :)

afriendofcheese
02-23-2017, 09:46 AM
Is that girder preventing drain from being moved closer to center?

Yes, it is.

When you pack a mud base, you make a level perimeter, and slope to the drain from there. Not sure I understand the problem. Self leveling would be wholly unnecessary.

Ok, I believe I wasn't thinking about how to go about this correctly. So since the furthest back corner from the drain is 52" away, the perimeter needs to be just over 1" above the drain. However, I need to draw the perimeter edge 1/4" per foot above the highest point of the shower (which would be the middle), not the back of it, since it is lower than the rest of the floor. Do I have this right?

Considering the drain is about 1/4" lower than the highest point of the subfloor, doing this would result in a finished layout where the slope at the closest point to the drain (just 10" away) would begin at a height of nearly 1.5" above the drain, creating what I imagined to be a pretty dramatic slope. If sloping that much over less than a foot isn't a problem, I guess I can proceed?

Thanks for helping me figure all this out guys.