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Old 09-30-2011, 10:48 AM   #16
HooKooDoo Ku
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While I don't begin to claim to have a full understanding of plumbing codes, I don't see any obvious issue with the drain plan - save the need for cleanouts.

I assume that horizontal run of vent is properly sloped.

On the subject of cleanouts, here's what I could find:
Quote:
Originally Posted by 708.3.3 - 2006 IPC
Cleanouts shall be installed at each change of direction greater than 45 degrees in the building sewer, building drain and horizontal waste or soil lines. Where more than one change ofdirection occurs in a run of piping, only one cleanout shall be required for each 40 feet of developed length of the drainage piping.
However, I would agree that you need to run your plan by the local building inspector... more specifically, since you are making major changes to the sewer system, you should be obtaining a building permit if you have not already.
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Old 09-30-2011, 10:57 AM   #17
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Wet venting example

Thanks for the replies.

Here is a pic of the wet vent example I used. I'm also attaching the PDF where I found this example. It specifically describes horizontal wet venting for Seattle/King County according to 2009 UPC. I'm on the east side of Washington, so I'll need to check with my local code guy to see if horizontal wet venting is allowed over here.

I previously thought I could use the same drain diameters shown in the example...2" everywhere before the toilet wye...3" thereafter.

I hadn't thought about cleanouts yet. Thanks for the heads up.
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Old 11-21-2011, 01:45 PM   #18
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1. What would be the 'standard' depth (the narrow dimension) for a rectangluar shower?

I need to tell my plumber where to rough in the shower drain. I told him 15" off the drywall, which would give me a 30" shower pan (less 2x the tile depth) if I want the drain centered in the shower pan (which I do). Then my curb would add another ~3" to that for a total depth of 33" inches for the pan plus curb.

2. Is this ^^ reasonably sized? The shower width is 60"

3. This will be a mud preslope + kerdi membrane shower built over a basement concrete slab. My plumber just needs to stub out the shower drain a few inches higher than the final concrete slab height. Is that correct?

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Old 11-21-2011, 07:19 PM   #19
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1,2. Kent, for purposes of meeting building code, it's generally accepted that you must be able to fit a thirty-inch hoop in your shower horizontally. Doesn't hafta fit through the opening, just fit inside the shower.

Always some argument about at what height it must fit in there, and I don't think I've ever seen anything in writing 'splaining that. But it's gotta be out there somewhere, eh?

3. I want my Kerdi drain at least 3/4" above the concrete slab, but I wouldn't want it higher than about an inch. You can set it higher, but it just raises the entire shower floor unnecessarily.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 11-21-2011, 07:21 PM   #20
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1- Whatever Mrs Kent wants.

2- Consider proportions, that would seem long and narrow to me, 4 feet wide x 6 feet would be nicer. But then this is Texas...

3- If he can leave the riser pipe loose and sticking out of the P-trap you'll be in great shape as you can tile the walls, then float the floor all without letting a stub of a pipe get in the way.
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Old 11-21-2011, 10:11 PM   #21
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CX and Paul,

Thanks for the advice.

The bathroom is spatially challenged at 86" x 59". So, a ~32" inch deep shower plus a 30" terlet opening leaves a 24" spot for a vanity. Thusly, I'm kind of stuck with the 32"x59" shower unless I want to cheat code on the terlet opening or go with an even tinier sink. I agree it will seem a bit long and narrow, but a corner shower seat will help take up some of that length. Plus it's going to be a whole lot better than the neo-angle plastic shower thingie it's replacing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cx
3. I want my Kerdi drain at least 3/4" above the concrete slab, but I wouldn't want it higher than about an inch. You can set it higher, but it just raises the entire shower floor unnecessarily.
Roger that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul
3- If he can leave the riser pipe loose and sticking out of the P-trap you'll be in great shape as you can tile the walls, then float the floor all without letting a stub of a pipe get in the way.
Hmmm...not quite following this. What are you describing when you say 'float the floor'?

I understand the benefit of tiling the walls before building the preslope, and I plan on doing just that.
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Old 11-21-2011, 10:32 PM   #22
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Think Paul misinterpreted your measurements to make that shower six feet long 'steada 60 inches. Tub replacement footprint is a very, very common remodel size for a shower.

What Paul means by the loose riser pipe is just not installing the drain nor even gluing in the riser pipe until such time as you're ready to "float" or shape your mud floor.

In a Kerdi shower I always wait until the very last minute to install my drain. Why? Because I can.

I like to have the shower tiled and mostly grouted before I set the drain or mud my floor. Don't hafta work around, or worry about damaging, the drain or the Kerdi floor that way.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 11-21-2011, 11:56 PM   #23
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Now I'm wit' cha.
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Old 11-29-2011, 12:33 AM   #24
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Upward and onward...

The DWV has been roughed in and passes the pressure test (including the superty duperty backwater valve assembly). Yea!!!

The next step is to call the inspector and, after it passes, get the rough in tied into the main sewer line and upstairs vent, but I could use some advice on one small issue I found. The issue is that the toilet flange has been set, and it was set so as to be flush with the concrete slab rather than the finished floor height.

The floor tile will most likely be 3/8" thick porcelain that will be installed directly on the [soon to be repoured] slab. There is a small chance I will put Ditra down under the tile.

My plan right now is to leave the flange as is and just tile around it. I think the situation is non-ideal, but not at all problematic for the finished bathroom product. If it is going to be a problem down the road, then I will hold off on the inspection and ask the plumber to reset the flange.

WWCXD?

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Old 11-29-2011, 05:42 AM   #25
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Quote:
WWCXD
CX would be amused.

The flange should sit on top of the finished floor surface. All toilets are designed with this in mind, so having yours flush or below the surface would leave a wide gap for the wax seal to fill. This could lead to a blow out if you ever have a back-up and use a plunger to blast out the clog. Since this is permited and inspected work, your inspector should catch this and make you re-do it. I'd fix it while the fixin's easy.
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Old 11-29-2011, 09:59 AM   #26
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Yep, yep, he'd be amused.

Inna older days when we had far fewer options for terlit pipe flange connection, it was still quite common to leave the lead riser run wild above the slab until the finished floor was installed and then set the flange and solder to the riser. Even in code compliance jurisdictions this was usually acceptable.

In your current situation, I'd check with your compliance inspector and see wouldn't it be acceptable to simply remove the existing flange until finished floor and then use one of the available flanges that are designed to fit down into your closet bend riser after the fact. And then fasten into the floor.

Some if that may depend upon the size and type and condition of the existing drain riser.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 11-29-2011, 01:02 PM   #27
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Talk about amusement...Bob said 'back-up', 'blast out', and 'blow out' all in one sentence!

I think I have a plan:

1. Cut out the existing flange + riser pipe + long sweep 90.

2. Replace the riser pipe + long sweep 90 with a 4x3 reducing (spigot x hub) closet bend.

3. Leave the closet bend stubbed out over the finished floor height.

4. Wrap the closet bend with cardboard before the slab repour to give adequate room for step 7.

5. Pour the slab and tile it.

6. Cut the closet bend off flush with the tile floor.

7. Glue a 4" hub (outside) closet flange over the 4" spigot closet bend. Stainless ring is sitting on the tile floor.

Two questions:

1. From reading about the interwebs, it sounds like I can swap steps 6. and 7. and just cut off the riser pipe to be flush with the top of the flange? The outside closet flange will slide down the spigot end of the closet bend until the stainless ring bottoms out on the tile. Is this correct?

2. Will I need to anchor the closet flange by drilling through the tile and into the slab?

Thanks,
Kent
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Old 12-01-2011, 02:17 PM   #28
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Now that the pluming is roughed in, I am turning to the bathroom/shower framing. The existing framing is, of course, typical home owner grade yuck. That's the bad news. The good news is that I get to do more demo work. New reciprocating saw = happy Kent.

A. When framing for the shower walls, is douglas fir or hemlock fir preferred? I am in the PNW if my locale effects your answer.

B. A 2" vent line can be safely run horizontally through a 2x6 stud, but not through a 2x4 stud. This is a non-load bearing wall.

C. What size hole saw should I buy for said 2" ABS vent line?

D. Is there a reference thread for proper shower framing? I am especially interested in what to do in the corners and at the curb where the sliding glass door frame will be secured to the wall.

Thanks,
Kent
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Old 12-02-2011, 11:49 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdev
A. When framing for the shower walls, is douglas fir or hemlock fir preferred? I am in the PNW if my locale effects your answer.

D. Is there a reference thread for proper shower framing? I am especially interested in what to do in the corners and at the curb where the sliding glass door frame will be secured to the wall.
Pre-weekend bump for these 2 questions in particular. I'd like to buy the studs today and stick them in the basement to let the wood acclimate, and then frame on Sunday.

Saturday I get to pretend I'm Clark Griswold.

Thanks!
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Old 12-02-2011, 12:03 PM   #30
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A- Dry, straight, and true no matter the species.

D- Good idea. Someone should make a thread about this.

Use classic framing techniques but add extra blocking or studding in the corners along with 3" deck screws to tie everything together. Where the curb intersects the wall, we prefer a curb width of sistered wall studs properly nailed / screwed together.
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