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Old 08-28-2011, 06:05 PM   #1
Geocade
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Kerdi Curb

Hi. First a little intro, then a small question.
To be clear, I am a newb with this stuff.
I am resonably proficient with home renos, but I am tackling a shower re-do for the first time. I am looking at tiling a small shower - about 44x32 and will 'Kerdi' it first. It is on the 2nd floor - with a wood subfloor. I expect to create a mud deck. While I have been lurking for some time, I will no doubt have a ton of questions.

My first is with respect to the Kerdi curb. For those who have been using them for a while, I am concerned with how strong they are. Do they stand up to supporting a heavy shower door, people standing on them (I have kids) etc.

I like the idea of a preformed curb (less work) but want to insure longevity.

Thanks.
Geoff
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Old 08-28-2011, 07:06 PM   #2
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Schluter Curbs on fine. Plenty strong. You could build your curb out 2 by lumber since you are on a wood floor. I have used the Schluter Curbs when called for in the contract. No problems.

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Old 08-28-2011, 08:48 PM   #3
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Once sheathed in Kerdi and tile, it is plenty strong. Before you cover it over, be careful of any solvents...the pvc cement will eat a hole if it comes in contact...you don't have to ask how I know that! It is moderately high and wide...you have more control if you build one yourself, but they do work fine.
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Old 09-04-2011, 08:48 AM   #4
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Project - Geoff's Bath Reno

Hello all:

As mentioned on a previous post, I have taken it upon myself to completly redo a small 3/4 bath in my house - it's on the second storey. I would appreciate all help as I stumble through it.

It will have a 42 x 32 shower - which I will 'kerdi' and then tile. The decision maker is still working on tile decisions, but as she doesn't want too many grout lines I will be looking at a larger tile.

In the shower area, I am in the middle of sraightening the framing in this 50 year old house and then will be drywalling it with 5/8 drywall. I will create a mud deck with kerdi drain. The curb will be double width 2x6 on end, covered with concrete backer (1/4 if I can find it).

My first question is with respect to the mud base. Do I take the drywall right down to existing floor and then put the mud right up against it - esentially covering it? I would have worried about the moisture affecting the drywall or vice versa. I don't see anyone putting any membrane between them?

Any other comments regarding my general plan of action?

I'll thank everyone in advance for what will no doubt be a number of questions.

Geoff
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Old 09-04-2011, 10:39 AM   #5
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Welcime, Geoff.

It'll help if you'll keep all your project questions on one thread so folks can see what you're working on and what's been previously asked and answered.

Install your sheetrock all the way to within a half-inch of your floor as is normally done so you can fasten it to the sole plate.

If you mix your deck mud properly, there is no danger in placing it against the bottom of the sheetrock. Proper mixing instructions can be found in the Shower Construction section of our whirl-famous Liberry.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 09-19-2011, 05:46 PM   #6
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Good Day:

I have finally hung all the drywall and have a couple of questions about its prep before the kerdi membrane.

1. I wish to confirm and get some expansion of the info in the Kerdi Shower Book. Screw holes are filled level with drywall compound, but joints are only filled level with drywall compound, but no tape is added? Then kerdi-ed over when dry.

2. How about outside corners - simply cover with drywall compound, but no tape?

3. No tape or drywall compound at all in the inside corners?

4. Any benefit / need to priming the drywall first? I am concerned with the thinset sticking to the drywall compound.

5. What is everyone's preference with respect to curbs? I intially was going to cover the curb with CBU, but I am wondering about simply using drywall - due to ease. I am worried that the drywall may crush over time - esp on top.

Thanks
Geoff
(At this rate I'll be able to have a shower in about 4 months........)
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Old 09-19-2011, 09:57 PM   #7
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Hi Geoff,

1) I wouldn't bother filling the screw holes with compound ahead of time. They will be filled with thinset as you spread the thinset to hang the Kerdi.

2 and 3) Completely avoid the use of drywall compound or tape on drywall joints, whether they are butt joints, inside corners, or outside corners if they are to be covered with Kerdi.

4) Avoid the use of compound so you can avoid the use of primer. Thinset sticks tremendously well to the bare paper layer of drywall. Primer becomes an an extra layer and the thinset will only stick as well as the paint sticks. Seeing as how paint likes to get soft when covered with a layer of wet thinset, I avoid it altogether. Bare paper is best.

5) Use whichever you like. There is no danger of the drywall crushing over time when covered with Kerdi and tile. If there was a danger of crushing the drywall, there would be no way you could use the foam curbs that Schluter makes. So rest assured that you won't have this "crushing" issue that you're concerned about.

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Old 09-26-2011, 07:20 PM   #8
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Thanks for the replies. I am slowly making some progress on this.

I am preparing to make a mud bed for the shower. Admittedly this is my first attempt. Tonight I made a full size practise test bed and it is curing as I type.

I have a couple of questions on this.

1. While I am generally pleased with my practise bed, I may have some very small depressions. If that happens on my final version, can I use a skim coat of thinset to smooth and level the bed. Let it dry and then kerdi it. I appreciate this may be a very thin skim coat.

2. How hard do you need to compact the mud?

3. One observation. I am pretty sure I the right consistency, but it struck me that a little wetter would make it easier to work and smooth and still maintain its shape.

Thanks for the tips.

Geoff
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Old 09-26-2011, 08:10 PM   #9
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1. Don't let that happen on your final version. You've practiced. You should have no trouble at all making it all quite flat and properly sloped. Easiest if you'll cut you several straight edges to fit the distances from drain to corners and to each side. Having half a dozen nice, straight, square-edged, screed boards doesn't make you a sissy, it makes you smarter than the average DIYer.

2. No need to pack it hard enough to walk on. No need to beat it like a stepchild. Just whack it with your wood float liken to if you were killin' scorpions on the mud. Or some such. You want it tight enough so it wants to stay in place as you scrape the surface off to shape it properly.

Some folks like to hammer on theirs more than others. Michael Byrne, for example, wants literally to be able to walk on his when he's finished, but you'll have no problem leaving footprints in mine when I call it done.

It'll cure quite hard enough for the intended purpose either way.

A little wetter always makes mud more difficult to work far as I'm concerned. Easiest possible mud would have no water at all. Just pewsh it around 'till it's flat. But that wouldn't cure out very well. I recommend you visit our whirl-famous Liberry and find the Shower Construction section. In there John Bridge has a nice article on deck mud. If you make yours like that, you'll have no problem shaping it correctly and having a very tileable surface.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 10-03-2011, 07:19 PM   #10
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Thanks Everyone!

I have a (even if I say so my self) nice mud bed. It was a little wetter than the first one, but all went well.

BTW, Up here, I could only imagine how hard one must strike a scorpion with a float. I tried to think of it as packing the snow for a fort....

To CX;

I think you mentioned on someone else's thread that you covered the exposed edge of drywall on the outside corner with Kerdi Fix? I trust you just smear it on with the caulking gun and trowel (finger). Do you let it dry before installing the kerdi and thinset over top? Or thinset to the edge of the kerdi fix and go right over both wet surfaces with the kerdi?

Any cheaper options? I have a few such exposed corners.

Thanks
Geoff
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Old 10-04-2011, 04:24 AM   #11
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If those exposed corners are to be tiled, you can simply wrap the Kerdi around them. Ease the sharp corner of the drywall to about a 1/4" radius to help the Kerdi stay flat. If they are to be painted, you need to tape and mud them using the metal reinforced corner tape and drywall mud. Yes, that sounds like it contradicts earlier advice not to use drywall tape and mud behind the Kerdi, but it's one of those exceptions to the rules.
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Old 10-14-2011, 05:22 PM   #12
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Well I created the mud bed a couple of weeks ago - see post above (and I am about to spend another weekend on my project). I am happy with the results. I have one question with it though - before I get into my kerdi project.

The grains of sand on the top of the mud bed seem rather easy to rub off. I vacumm the bed then rub my hand over the surface and can dislodge more grains.

This was a couple of bags of premixed sandmix (3:1) to which I added about a half a bag of additional construction sand to bring it up to the recommended ratio as per the mud bed info in the library.


I am concerned about grains coming off and compromising the kerdi during the process of pushing the excess thinset out from under it during installation.

Is this normal, of concern etc.

As always the comments of those more experienced than me are appreciated.
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Old 10-15-2011, 08:44 PM   #13
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if youre concerned........... skim coat it with thinset to seal the top layer of sand.


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Old 10-16-2011, 12:10 PM   #14
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Mrs. Geoff is trying Geoff's patience.

As outlined above, the mud bed has been in for a couple of weeks. We were at the tile store yesterday, to finalize tile selection.

The mud bed was done with a slope of 0.5 inch per foot. This was done based on the initial desire for a riverstone shower base.

Mrs. Geoff saw a 2 x 2 tile she liked better. The shower is about 44 x 32 inches. This makes for a steep side slope.

Option 1: Can the mud bed be easily shaped down to acheive a less steep grade?

Option 2: Remove the mud bed and start again (trying to save the kerdi drain)

Option 3: Tile as is and say I told you so every time there is a complaint about a slippery shower floor.

Nothing has been kerdi'ed yet as supplies are delayed by the post office.

Any suggestions? Thanks
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Old 10-17-2011, 08:22 PM   #15
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Rip the mud out. You can save the drain. Mud doesnt stick to the plastic very well.


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