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Old 08-14-2011, 07:06 PM   #16
BobL43
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Thanks Paul, but would it just be overkill to glue the joint, or would it be detrimental?

Thanks again
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Old 08-14-2011, 07:11 PM   #17
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If done incorrectly it can be, Bob. Manufacturer's who recommend gluing those joints always caution that you apply construction adhesive to only one side of the tongue or groove.

But some are machined not to want anything in there. Look at your grade stamp and see can you find the manufacturer online and see what do they recommend.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 09-02-2011, 11:20 AM   #18
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Back at it again

OK, so now I am almost done with the sheetrocking, and my wife and I will be picking out some tile for the walls and floor. I have a question about the best way to get the wall tile meeting at the door and window casing moldings.

The door jamb is going to be replaced and new casings will be installed. I don't know exactly where to end the tiling around the door opening if the jambs are not in yet. In the past, I would bring the tile up to a point where I knew would be covered by the casing moldings (which I fabricated myself) and made the moldings with a rabbet cut that would sit over the tile, which looked nice and neat. Until I install the new door and jambs, is there any other way to do this? Even if I was using the old jambs in place, what is the professional's way of tiling up to a doorway? Must the casings be in place, and then the tile placed up to it and caulked? I'm holding off on putting in a new door and jambs because the tub I'm putting in may not fit into the door opening, but will fit through the rough opening. It is an acrylic claw foot slipper tub that will have to be maneuvered carefully through the opening, and the additional 1 1/2 inches or so that the RO is should be "easy" -er
By the way, the gluing at the plywood T&G joint: I read that if it is glued, shrinkage of the wood can cause the tongue to rip off the plywood, so I did not glue it there
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Last edited by BobL43; 09-02-2011 at 11:22 AM. Reason: afterthought
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Old 09-04-2011, 10:29 AM   #19
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Old 09-04-2011, 11:33 AM   #20
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Bob, no way we can help you with that. If you're convinced you need to set the tiles that finish at the door casing, you're gonna need to measure carefully where that casing will fall. As a veteran of many, many door installs, I can understand your problem, but I can't help you solve it from over here, eh?

You should be able to measure plumb on your rough opening, measure for necessary shimming if your rough isn't plumb, measure the width of your casing from the desired reveal on the jamb edge, and mark a line within an eighth-inch or so to end your tile.

Or I'd just leave off the last row of tile until I had the jambs set.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 09-04-2011, 02:54 PM   #21
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Thanks CX, at least I got some empathy from you on this. I will probably do what you said about leaving the last row off until the door is all done. With the moldings my wife want me to use this time, the white ones with the flutes and the little square whatcha macallits with the rosebuds in the corners, I'm not gong to attempt a rabbet cut on those. I've seen some nasty tile work done that looks like the tile "mechanic" just did not give a crap about how the tile looks where it meets the door casings.
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Old 09-15-2011, 11:15 AM   #22
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Support Beam installed

OK, yesterday I bit the bullet and crawled 20 feet under the overhang and my attached deck and installed the concrete piers and support beam under the bathroom's cantelevered floor section. I got sore, very filthy, but got it done. The dirt and leaves not left on the concrete patio were all stuck to me and my sweat from dragging all that stuff and the jack, plus being under there for a while jockeying it all into place. If this does not support the 3 foot overhung floor from some snow on the roof, then I guess nothing will.

It is (now) straighter than it looks in picture

I am glad that part is done, and I got the sheetrock done as well, except for the spackling. Thats next, then time for my wife to choose the tile for the walls and floor
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Old 09-20-2011, 10:24 AM   #23
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Tile Shopping

I went tile shopping yesterday afternoon with my wife and she found a Subway wall tile she likes and a woodgrain porcelain floor tile she likes as well. My wife and I were the only customers in this very popular tile showroom, but the salseperson on duty was busy on the phone most of the time and was unable to spend much time with us.
I have a couple of questions that i would have like to ask there, but they came to mind after I left the showroom.
1) White ceramic 3X6 inch subway tiles: are they typically mounted on mesh mats, or are they installed as individual 3X6 inch pieces?

2) The porcelain floor tiles were very realistic looking in both color and texture, but they were very titely together with no noticable grout line that I can recall after not being there. Are these ( approx 5 inch X 32 inch or so "planks") installed normally without visible grout lines? They may have been there, but really tight.
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Old 09-21-2011, 08:13 PM   #24
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1- individual tiles

2- all tile needs space between them to account for differential movement. Those tile will require 3/16 minimum, more if warped (very likely). They will also need a very flat floor to set on. Industry standard recommends no more than 33% offset on the end joints, and less offset may be required to reduce lippage if the tiles are warped.
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Old 09-22-2011, 10:52 AM   #25
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Thanks Dana,

albero.pdf

From the spec sheet I have attached here, it shows this is a rectified tile and the facial dimension tolerances, etc. It does show the joint size to be 3 or 4 mm.
Any opinions on this tile or any more suggestions as to possible special installtaion needs. I appreciate any and all help I get here.

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Old 09-22-2011, 11:21 AM   #26
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Verify the dimensions and how flat they are, you'll need to open a number of boxes. Lay the tiles on a flat surface like a table, and measure how much warpage you have. The tiles may meet ANSI specs for warp, but due to their size, may be impossible to set without lippage. That's where the 33% max offset comes from. As stated above, depending of warpage and offset, the grout joist may have to grow to 'reduce' lippage (adjacent tile edges at different heights).

Industry standards are in my previous post, which apply to your tiles unless they are all exactly the same size and perfectly flat, which you'll verify. "Rectified" means different things to different folks - need to see the tile and measure a stack of em to know what it means to this particular manufacturer.
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Old 10-23-2011, 05:22 PM   #27
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Grief cutting Marble Mosaic tiles

Arrrgh! I bought some marble mosaic sheets at Lowe's the other day and though I'd try cutting them into the detail strips I need for my marble subway tile wall. I have th elittle POS Home Cheapo wre tile saw in the photo and made a piece of plywood support with a saw kerf cut in it to support the tile pieces, which are each the size of dominos. First attempt was without the wood support, and as I fed the material slowly through the saw, the tile would break as show in the photos about halfway into each piece. the plywood support made no difference. The blade cuts 6x6 inch or so, ceramic tiles with no problem. The blade has made a bunch of cuts, but not like hundreds through ceramic tiles and I am not sure if a new blade will solve this issue of maybe I have to buy a decent wet saw? As I feed the marble piece through, there is a little (very small pieces, like course sand) chipping, but the cut is looking good until it snaps off as seen. The broken pieces are easy to see in the lower left corner of the close up. One good thing, is that the mesh backing is plastic, and so far the glue has not loosened from the water

If not a wet saw, can a score and snap tile cutter do a good job on this material? Please help! Thanks!
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Old 10-23-2011, 05:43 PM   #28
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Every stone is different, so we need to experiment sometimes to find a way to cut some of them.

Try dressing the blade first. Use a dressing stone or piece of concrete block or paver. Run it through the blade slowly about dozen times. This will wear away the diamond matrix and expose new sharp diamonds.

Then, try feeding the stone through a bit slower.

If these don't work, might need a new blade, or new saw. Any wobble in the blade? Are you feeding straight through the blade and not at an angle?

A pro quality snap cutter might work, but renting a decent wet saw would be way cheaper.
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Old 10-24-2011, 08:52 AM   #29
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Thanks Dana, I'll try redressing the blade, and if it does not help, I'll buy a new blade. The blade does run true and has no wobble, but I'll double check both. The saw only has about maybe 5 or 7 hours running time on it, and I never forced any material through it, so I would not expect the motor bearings to be worn or the shaft be bent. Its always made true cuts before, but it is a very low cost saw and although not really extremely flimsy, it is a bare bones quality tool. I have to "only" cut 28 feature strips altogether, and I bought 14 of these 1 ft. Sq mosaic mats, so I should have more than enough mats if I overcome the cutting difficulty. I also have to cut some marble chair rail and pencil rod to go around this little 7X7 foot bathroom, but the cuts on them should be minimum: miter cuts in the corners for a total of 8 cuts each equaling 16 cuts. Those pieces are more expensive, as one bad cut = 1 "ruined" piece, plus the necessary cuts on the 3X6 Marble subway tiles, about 13 courses high at the wall corners.

Thanks again
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Old 10-24-2011, 08:56 AM   #30
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Apply a strip of 2" wide painter's tape across the cut line to see if the additional support helps with your breakage.
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