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Old 05-18-2011, 12:00 PM   #16
dhagin
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I've seen lots of trusses, site-built and factory built, wood, steel, wood & steel, etc... Never seen one exactly like yours.

If you don't mind, could you post a few more close-ups when you get a chance? I'm also curious who the original log home supplier was, there might me truss info "out there" somewhere...

Thanks.
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Old 05-18-2011, 07:10 PM   #17
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Dana,
Let me know if you need more detail. Tried to show the trusses in another area of the basement without so many water lines running. One of them shows the top of the truss without being covered by the shiny insulation.

The log home kit came from a company called Cathedral Log Homes...this was about 10 years ago- in Vermont.
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Old 05-18-2011, 09:14 PM   #18
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Thanks Josie.
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Old 05-19-2011, 06:19 AM   #19
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Dana, Now that I am looking at these trusses so closely, I noticed something this morning. The trusses that span ~23' are built with 2x4's as top and bottom plates; however, those spanning the 11' under this bathroom are only built with 2x3's. I have to believe that this would have been a cost-cutting trick by the log home kit supplier... amazing...
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Old 05-19-2011, 06:20 AM   #20
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Dana, Now that I am looking at these trusses so closely, I noticed something this morning. The trusses that span ~23' are built with 2x4's as top and bottom plates; however, those spanning the 11' under this bathroom are only built with 2x3's. I have to believe that this would have been a cost-cutting trick by the log home kit supplier... amazing...
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Old 05-19-2011, 07:36 AM   #21
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It is a cost saving measure, but it's no trick. The top and bottom chords of a floor truss like yours do all the heavy lifting. The longer the truss has to span, the bigger the chords have to be, or the deeper the entire truss has to be. When they looked at the span, they selected a standardized truss design that fit the available space and could support the required loads. They didn't cheap out, they did save money. Your money.
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Old 05-19-2011, 09:07 AM   #22
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Bob,
Thanks for the comment and the different sizes likely kept the costs in line. The pattern of sizing with the chords fits your information. I guess that I am just not used to trusses flexing and my ability to sense movement in floors as flexing occurs. I have always lived in houses with joists (not trusses) and my last house was probably overbuilt for solidity, but I loved it!
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Old 05-19-2011, 09:20 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josie
I guess that I am just not used to trusses flexing
Me either, that's the part that has me somewhat concerned as well.
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Old 05-20-2011, 02:08 PM   #24
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Dana,
Mr.Josie is in the process of adding both blocking and cross bracing between the trusses. We only want to do this project 1 time.... Thanks so much for your input.

I am working to finish up all of the drywall repair work (including priming) to allow me to lay the Ditra this weekend. While that dries, I will be dry laying these gorgeous, but uneven quartzite tiles to prep for floor tiling.

I downloaded the John Bridge Kerdi Shower eBook and have been scanning it today. It confirmed that we do not need to tape where the greenboard meets the existing drywall, but only in the recessed areas to planarize. (Plus we could have used regular drywall...oh well).

The shower is now green boarded and 2 niches built.

Just spoke to the Miracle Sealer folks and confirmed that I can seal the honed quartzite accent tiles. They also suggested for the shower floor, using sliced tumbled marble on sheets, that instead of using the Mira Matte plus sealer, that I swap the MiraMatte for Seal and Enhance to get the "wet look". Does anyone out there have an opinion on either the 2 step or 1 step plan?

Thanks!
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Old 05-20-2011, 07:14 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josie
It confirmed that we do not need to tape where the greenboard meets the existing drywall, but only in the recessed areas to planarize.
No drywall mud or tape anywhere you're going to put Kerdi up. If you're using small tiles, you can float any recesses or low areas with thinset mortar after the Kerdi is up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Josie
Does anyone out there have an opinion on either the 2 step or 1 step plan?
Might want to post this question in the "Cleaning, Restoration and Sealing" forum with a link back to this thread.
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Old 05-21-2011, 01:34 PM   #26
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Dana,
To your comment regarding "no drywall mud or tape under Kerdi", I specifically purchased the John Bridge's Kerdi eBook yesterday for questions such as this. Page 22 specifically says to add drywall mud to any recessed joints in the drywall:

Taping and Finishing
Except for the “recess” joints (the horizontal seams between the boards), it is not necessary to tape, float or otherwise finish the sheetrock that will be covered with Kerdi. The membrane itself provides much more connective strength than drywall tape is capable of. Further, the build-up of joint compound can actually become a hindrance when completing the shower.
Since the Kerdi-covered drywall is the actual substrate upon which the tiles will be installed, it’s important to keep it as flat as possible. The depressed horizontal joints can be filled with drywall compound only to the surface plane of the panels themselves. This will ensure a smooth, flat substrate
when the tiles are later installed.

So, that's what I have done....simply filled in the depressed joints at the edge of the green board. Do you feel that I should prime them when I prime the remainder of the bathroom?
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Old 05-21-2011, 02:23 PM   #27
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Thanks for pointing that out Josie. I haven't read thru my copy in a while, maybe i should.

If you used premixed joint compound, then prime over it. If you used dry stuff that you mixed with water, no need to prime.
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Old 05-21-2011, 06:43 PM   #28
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Dana,
Thanks for replying today since I am ready to prime tomorrow morning
I used the premix, so it will receive primer.

The rest is finally moving along after the discovery of the floor issues. After priming the walls tomorrow morning, we'll lay Ditra to prep for the quartzite.

Tonight, however, was a run into the gym and a couple of nice, long showers. Since this is our only bathroom, we have a porta-potti in the yard and showering consists of either sponge baths or showers in the office or gym. That's already gotten old.

So, an evening on the deck watching the sunset with a couple of nice, cold beers. Back to work tomorrow....

Your input has been invaluable...thanks for the help so far...
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Old 05-22-2011, 02:54 PM   #29
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Dana,
Just a side note to you- Mr. Josie felt so strongly that your advice regarding the trusses was right-on that he's planning to follow suit throughout the entire basement once this bathroom project has been completed. He's blocking and adding cross-braces...
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Old 05-22-2011, 03:01 PM   #30
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So the shower has greenboard installed and mudded, then primed in all the recessed joints. The entire bathroom also got a coat of primer and top coat paint (glad that's out of the way).

Tonight I will be laying the Ditra, then dry-laying the 12 x 12" tumbled quartzite tiles to pick the best once for critical areas. My question is,
1. Are there any tricks to the trade when installing tiles such as these? I did hear that the thickest ones should go down first to essentially "set the height". (Meaning, backbuttering the thinner ones) Does that sound right?

2. We are using Mapei Untraflex II modified thinset. What is the correct trowel to use to ensure that I am laying the correct amount?

3. Is there anything else that I should know regarding laying stone vs. porcelain tile?

Thanks!
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