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Old 04-13-2011, 12:09 PM   #1
jabjab
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Cutting 20 inch porcelain tile

I want to do a diagonal layout.

Trying to find a tile saw and found this at Home Depot
Large cutting capacity at 34 in. rip or 24 in. diagonal cut

How do you read those numbers? The guy at Home Depot said the 24 means that it will cut up to a 24 inch tile on a diagonal.

I think it means it will only cut 24 inches in total. Which means it will not cut a 20X20 tile.

Does anyone know? Any suggestions or tricks cuting 20X20 tile. Layout front door to hall to kitchen/family room. I was going to start with 1/2's at the frond door.

Any suggestions on a saw for a single project.

Thank you
JJ

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Model # R4090
Internet # 202141119
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Old 04-13-2011, 12:37 PM   #2
cx
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Welcome, JJ.

The 34" rip capacity just happens to be the diagonal of a 24" square tile, eh? I'd say that's what they are leading us to believe.

I've never seen nor used the saw.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 04-13-2011, 11:34 PM   #3
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It's much nicer to be able to cut all the way through on one pass, but I did a diagonal tub surround where I had to cut part way through the tile, turn it around, and cut the rest of the way. You have to be quite exact, and the table needs to be true, the blade sharp and not wobbling, and have a good eye, but it can be done.
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Old 04-13-2011, 11:53 PM   #4
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Single job saw? I'd say rent. Home Depot has some MK101-24" saws for rent. Sure they've been dropped and the blade may be nicked, but its better than buying a cheap/expensive saw and craigslisting it a few weeks later.

If you get a 24" rip saw, you can make a sled to go on the platform that will allow you to put the tile on the saw flat. But you'll have to either flip the tile or push it thru the last . . . wait a minute. You said cutting it diagonal. That means you'll likely never get it past the arm holding the blade. nevermind. Only saws that will likely do that would be a bridge saw, Like the Imer shown below. Might have a hard time finding one of those for rent.
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Old 04-14-2011, 10:42 AM   #5
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I am hopefully receiving the QEP 30" sometime next week.

amazon.com/gp/product/B001NFTEXA

$400 shipped, had a ton of gift cards/codes to use, so got it down to 170, worth a shot

thought about renting, but i know this will take a while to complete (slow and steady), so it would have been a big waste of money to do that.

i plan to do about 620 square feet of 20" at a diagonal, wasn't interested in trying to get them to realign on a flip at that volume, plus eventually will do bathrooms in the house so will probably keep it around for a while.

seems to have enough clearance and hopefully power to slowly cut through some granite to make a small backsplash behind the sink from some left over pieces.

also have a bunch of questions, but will eavesdrop here until i'm ready to start my own thread
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Old 04-14-2011, 10:50 AM   #6
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I have the previous version of this saw and you won't be ripping a 24" on the diagonal on mine without flipping it over. As mentioned in a previous post it is possible, but not much fun. But diagonal isn't much fun to me either. It does look good down though. Another option would be to use a hand grinder with a tile blade and a straight edge. Might be your least expenisve and most versitile option. I use my grinder on every job for something and often just take it, if I have a small job.
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Old 04-14-2011, 04:36 PM   #7
jadnashua
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You may find that cutting granite goes easier than porcelain...porcelain is a lot harder!
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Old 04-14-2011, 09:21 PM   #8
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really? wow, always figured it was the other way around, good to hear, wife wants to use some of the left over to have me use some of it to make accent pieces for the walls that are adjacent to the granite...
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Old 04-15-2011, 12:58 PM   #9
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If interested, look up Mohs hardness scale. A good porcelain is around 8-9 on the scale. Granite is a mix of at least 3 minerals, and the hardest one typically in it is a 6 (diamond is 10 and the hardest). Now, since granite can contain other minerals than the minimum of three that define it as a granite (feldspar, mica, and quartz), any one of the 'extra' things in it could be harder, but the majority of it would be a 6 at most.
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Old 04-18-2011, 05:38 PM   #10
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QEP Professional Bridge Saw 30in., Model# 830Z looks like my best bet.

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Old 10-17-2011, 02:05 PM   #11
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I'm considering purchasing the QEP 830Z as well... so, how did it go? Was it worth the money?
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