Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books   Buy a TYW Shirt

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-20-2011, 11:58 PM   #1
bastafidli
basta
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 11
Lesson learned about drywall for Kerdi shower

We have redone our shower using Kerdi 32- years ago and had a great experience. The common recommendation is to use dry wall under the Kerdi membrane. We have learned one important lesson this month. If you use dry wall to put Kedi on, remember that nothing protects the dry wall in case the pipe behind it develops a leak. In our case the pipe had minuscule leak which unfortunately/fortunately almost completely dissolved the drywall facing our shower. Had the leak been on opposite side of the pipe, our dry wall, which has Kerdi mounted on the other side and tile on top of it would be destroyed which would most likely let to very costly repair. This way the opposite wall was destroyed which was fortunately in our water heater cabinet. If I had to do it again, I would rethink how to protect the wall against water from both sides, constant usage of the shower and accidental leak in pipe. Just my 2 cents. Any ideas how to address scenario like this would be greatly appreciated.
bastafidli is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 02-21-2011, 12:09 AM   #2
Toddman
Independent Tile Contractor
 
Toddman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Rogers, MN
Posts: 832
Wow!! Bummer. The use of Durock would have minimalized the damage.
__________________
Todd

Good work is not cheap, and cheap work is not good.

http://www.toddthetileguy.com

Toddman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 12:18 AM   #3
MarkTarkus
Mark Christensen, Tile contractor
 
MarkTarkus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Lehi, Utah (just south of Salt Lake City)
Posts: 1,944
Interesting point to consider. Thanks for sharing.

Was it really 32 years ago or did you mean 3 or 2?
MarkTarkus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 12:21 AM   #4
Toddman
Independent Tile Contractor
 
Toddman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Rogers, MN
Posts: 832
Yea Mark... I didn't think Kerdi has been around for 32 years.
__________________
Todd

Good work is not cheap, and cheap work is not good.

http://www.toddthetileguy.com

Toddman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 05:31 AM   #5
bbcamp
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 30,305
You lost the drywall, and that means re-building your shower. Had you used backerboard, your leak would have remained un-detected until major structural rot revealed itself. Pick your poison.

Properly installed piping should not leak in 2 or 3 years, or 25 years, for that matter. Doing a leak test prior to closing up the walls is a must. Capping the pipes and leaving the water pressure on gives you a means of detecting an accidential puncture of your piping. Proper support of the pipes, especially the shower riser, means that when you attach the faucet or shower head, the pipe won't twist around and loosen any threaded fittings.
bbcamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 08:04 AM   #6
jondon
Hershey Pennsylvania Tile Contractor
 
jondon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Lebanon County Pennsylvania
Posts: 5,899
Send a message via AIM to jondon
Yes, I can see 2-3 years ago! I agree with Bob, in 2-3 years time frame nothing should be leaking but yes this is a problem and can go undetected for many years with it being a small leak. In the end it can cause huge problems as any buildup of water can. As mentioned I would say use Kerdi-Board but then the water would being going down onto the structure and would take a long time to notice.

The unfortunate part of plumbing is sometimes and most times you only see the problem when it comes to the surface and it can take years. We have smoke detectors and carbon monoxide protectors but there is no way to tell of a leak behind a wall till the damage is done. I guess you could put a glass on the walls to listen for any leaks now and then...lol

My Godfather's place was built in 1976 and I have see a few problems since I started working there in 2000. Recently he has had some plumbing problems in the same area of the home. They put these vent pieces on the lines for the baseboard heating, to let air escape. I asked him is this normal or was it just because the runs are long.

Two of these little pieces have gone bad on the same section of the home, luckily he found them before he had more damage in the room underneath. They had to remove the drywall to get to the lines. I guess after 35 years these vents should all be replaced but not without lots of tear-out.
__________________

Jon Donmoyer

JD Tile
CTEF Certified Installer #825

Custom Tile Installation in Hershey & surrounding areas

Serving Dauphin, Lebanon, Berks, Chester, & Montgomery Counties PA


jondon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 09:56 PM   #7
Hammy
Registered User
 
Hammy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Middle Tennessee
Posts: 4,915
Send a message via AIM to Hammy
Quote:
Doing a leak test prior to closing up the walls is a must. Bob
I did an install w/o doing a proper pressure test. After completing all the tile for the shower, we noticed a small leak in the basement. Turns out an elbow on the shower control valve was seeping. Had to cut a hole in the adjoining closet to repair the leak. Lesson learned NEVER CLOSE UP A WALL WITH PERFORMING A PRESSURE TEST.

Hammy
__________________
Kitchen & Bath Makeovers
T & J Construction Services
Manchester, TN 37355

Professionally Built Mold - Mildew - Moisture Resistant Showers
Using Laticrete & Schluter Products

Click here to Visit us on Face Book
Hammy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 10:04 PM   #8
muskymike
Moderator -- Wisconsin Tile Man & Musky Guide
 
muskymike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Springbrook WI
Posts: 15,791
Send a message via Yahoo to muskymike
I hadda job I did a couple years ago that one of the brass elbows somehow split and was leaking not real bad but bad enough that I hadda take the 12x12 piece of stone off because there was no access from behind to get to it.
__________________
Musky Mike
Corrado Custom Tile
Kerdi Shower Specialist
Dreams are like tasting a little bit of the future today. Keep dreaming and it will come true.

New here? Check this out.

muskymike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 10:15 PM   #9
cheakamus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Seattle
Posts: 160
If you have an appropriate control valve and can use the purpose-made 4-1/4" Schluter seal, then you should be able take the cover plate off the valve any time and inspect at least the part of the wall cavity directly behind the valve. (Of course, who's ever going to do that unless they already have a pretty good idea that something's going on back there.)
__________________
John
cheakamus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 10:29 PM   #10
cx
da Home-builder -- Moderator-at-Large
 
cx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Boerne, Texas
Posts: 74,991
Basta, in any building on a concrete slab on grade foundation plumbed with copper, there will be plumbing connections in walls where no plumbing fixtures exist just because you can't go more than 60 feet without coming up above grade for a connection. So there could be a plumbing leak behind sheetrock walls most any ol' place in the house.

Leaks in properly made connections are simply not something we generally make consideration for, behind the shower wall, or the living room wall.

When I build new houses, and even on remodels, I turn on the pressure water supply to the building at the very first opportunity and it remains "pressured up" at all times during the construction except when the plumbers are doing something that requires it to be temporarily shut off.

If there's a leak, I wanna know about it when it happens, the earlier the better.

Bottom line: I ain't askeered of plumbing leaks behind sheetrock in any one part of the house more than any other. Ain't gonna have no steenkin' leaks.

My opinion; worth price charged.
cx is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 12:11 AM   #11
bastafidli
basta
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 11
It was 3 years ago, 2008 sorry for the 32 typo :-). The pipe that leaked was most likely original copper pipe from 1972. It just developed the hole in the middle of straight section. We have now replaced the whole thing.

bbcamp, the pipe was between 2 sheetrock walls. Has the leak faced the wall with the kerdi and tiles on the other side, I would have to do major tear down and repair of my main shower wall. Since the leak faced the other wall away from the bathroom wall and we discovered it soon, we simply had to do simple no-brainer sheetrock replacement without touching the bathroom, kerdi, tiles.

The point I was trying to make (or lesson I learned was) that if you are going to put couple hundred/thousand $ worth of material on the wall, consider what may affect the wall from both sides, not just the one more obvious. Doing it again I would most likely use Durock for the wall I put Kerdi and tiles on since I would have higher chance of the wall not being destroyed had a leak developed behind it before i was able to fix it.

Thanks for all your comments, I am always learning
__________________
Basta
bastafidli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 12:29 AM   #12
hyrific
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7
I agree it makes sense as other parts of the house are not as expensive to repair leeks like that. All houses have plumbing leaks at one time or another and that is just a fact of life. I think that even if the leak sprayed toward cement board you would have noticed the water seeming through the bottom of the wall. The cement board would have saved the redo of the tile job.

Thanks for the heads up.

I have to say after I did a bunch of plumbing work on my bath I realized how precarious the plumbing really is and now whenever I leave the house for longer than a night or two I turn it off. What with power outages and what not anything is possible.
__________________
Hyroo
hyrific is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 08:16 AM   #13
Toddman
Independent Tile Contractor
 
Toddman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Rogers, MN
Posts: 832
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyroo
I agree it makes sense as other parts of the house are not as expensive to repair leeks like that.
Have to disagree with you on that one. Plenty of expensive stuff in the rest of the house too.

And like CX said, there's plumbing behind the walls all over the house. So to just protect a 5' section is almost pointless. That's why we have homeowners insurance.
__________________
Todd

Good work is not cheap, and cheap work is not good.

http://www.toddthetileguy.com

Toddman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 06:06 PM   #14
ceramictec
Tampa Florida Tile Contractor
 
ceramictec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 26,113
is there a room on the other side of the shower or is this on a second floor ?
I cant see how someone didn't see water damage in a adjoining room.
I have see tile on drywall not rot out and the wood baseboard or carpet in the next room show water problems in no time.

whats really sad is you left the old plumbing in there when it was torn apart and had a chance to redo and make new.

had a customer do the same thing and 3 months after we completed the shower here shower control started to leak bad, lucky for them they had access via a closet in the next room to cut into.
__________________
Brian
........
........Tampa Florida Tile Installation
..................Check out our Blog
Florida Installer of Laticrete HydroBan & HydroBarrier
....Florida Installer of Schluter Kerdi & Kerdi-Board
................."Waterproofed Tile Showers"
........Porcelain - Travertine - Ceramic - Glass Tile
ceramictec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2011, 09:01 PM   #15
Hammy
Registered User
 
Hammy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Middle Tennessee
Posts: 4,915
Send a message via AIM to Hammy
Quote:
had a customer do the same thing and 3 months after we completed the shower here shower control started to leak bad, lucky for them they had access via a closet in the next room to cut into.
__________________
...
...Brian
When I have customers suggest that. I ask them " would you buy a new car and keep the 10 year old tires? " Most say " well, No !! "

Hammy
__________________
Kitchen & Bath Makeovers
T & J Construction Services
Manchester, TN 37355

Professionally Built Mold - Mildew - Moisture Resistant Showers
Using Laticrete & Schluter Products

Click here to Visit us on Face Book
Hammy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Buy John's New Book!   Tile Your World Online Store   Contractors Direct Tile Tool Store   Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
BaBaLouís KERDI Shower - Lessons Learned and New Techniques babalou Tile Forum/Advice Board 27 01-03-2007 10:29 AM
Kerdi, drywall, and large shower assemblies djarchow Tile Forum/Advice Board 3 06-06-2005 05:12 PM
Lesson learned? Hydro Tile Forum/Advice Board 5 05-04-2005 08:04 PM
Kerdi matt over drywall for shower walls, really?? ninemile Professionals' Hangout 19 10-08-2003 06:57 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:20 PM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2014 John Bridge & Associates, LLC