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Old 01-14-2011, 05:31 AM   #1
infogeek
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Shower niche for foot rest

I am getting ready to start a shower for a customer and she wants somewhere to rest her foot to shave her legs. However, it is going to be a smaller shower and she doesn't want a bench taking up space. We had already planned on doing a shower niche for shampoo, soap, etc....she asked if we could just put a lower niche on the wall that she could use as a foot rest. I was thinking about one of tileredi's composite niches that seem to fairly sturdy.

http://www.tileredi.com/products_fil...hes/rn166s.php

We talked about placing the niche about 18" of the shower floor on the back wall (opposite of the shower head). Is this a bad idea? Do you think the niche would be compromised by repeated foot resting?

THanks, Tom
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Old 01-14-2011, 05:37 AM   #2
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opinions on shower pan

Has anyone ever used one of these shower pans? Any reports on experience, quality, ease of installation would be appreciated.

http://www.tileredi.com/products_files/34x48c.php

THanks, Tom
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Old 01-14-2011, 05:44 AM   #3
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Good morning!

I don't have any experience with it, but a quick forum search for "tile redi" came up with a lot of hits.
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Old 01-14-2011, 05:46 AM   #4
tileman2000
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Hi Tom,you can keep all your questions to one thread.

I've never used that particular pan,but at that price it's much cheaper to build a traditional shower pan.
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Old 01-14-2011, 05:50 AM   #5
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Hi Tom. I'm with Michael, it might work just fine but a traditional pan would be much cheaper.
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Old 01-14-2011, 05:56 AM   #6
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I myself think you would have problems with it over time. I use smallest Better Bench corner shelf. It's good and sturdy.
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Old 01-14-2011, 05:58 AM   #7
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I have built a small prop in the corner before, similar to a seat but much smaller. I haven't ever used one of those so I can't say about the strength.
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Old 01-14-2011, 06:23 AM   #8
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never used but I've heard it's a quality manufactured product.

The issue that is often brought up is the need to use the epoxy to set tile to it. Some Diyers have stuggled with the epoxy, set up times etc. Also you have to epoxy set 6 inches up the sides of the pan and then switch to your thinset at the transition to the wall substrate.
I'm sure Diyers are often attracted because it's name tile redi would seem/imply easy. Not sure the install is quite as easy as they believed.

and as mentioned, they are $$$$
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Old 01-14-2011, 08:11 AM   #9
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Wow! More than $500! And I thought kerdi was expensive.

I just put in a 32"x56" neo angle mud bed for under $200 including the kerdi drain and membrane. The mud part was only $20. And I'd never worked with deck mud before. And I'm a grrl. Just something to think about.
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Old 01-14-2011, 08:37 AM   #10
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I just finished a 60"x42" shower with a redi-tile pan.

I cut a center hole in a piece of 1/4" hardiebacker, used a modified thinset to adhere that to my T&G Advantech subfloor, screwed it down. Then Mixed about half a bag of kerrabond unmodified thinset and set the pan in that over the backer.

I also purchased their 'redi-flash' system, I think the concept of having a lapped flash is a good one (instead of just a butt joint of the CBU with some silicone). but the redi flash, for what it is, is quite overpriced.

Pros:

Had lots of home improvement to do, seems a redi tile pan installation is faster to install (literally took 2 hours), than doing a built up curb, deck mud, membrane, pre-pitch, etc. and my mudding skills are only moderate.

Being a single piece of HDPE, you pretty much cant screw it up and cause it to leak unless you deliberately puncture it. (be sure to use a vapor barrier, i used plastic sheeting against studs and behind the wall CBU)

Cons:

Price, it is very expensive compared to material cost of a drain, liner, mesh, mud and some 2x4's, but you've gotta have the skill to make the materials pay off, or you can end up with a leaky mess.

EPOXY. THINSET.

This is really the worst aspect of the pan.
The company ships a Part A, Part B and silica sand bags. The bags are different sizes, so you cant simply 'half' the mixtures to save some for later.

The pot life on this stuff is extremely short, preparation is key, when you mix the stuff, expect a 45 minute working time, no more.

I mixed the entire batch for fear of getting the mix ratios off and ending up with either a brittle mix, or one that would never harden. I was able to tile the pan base, the first course of wall tiles, and all of the curb except the very front.

In a pinch I found that using fine silica sand and standard epoxy resin/hardner (walmart automotive section) can create a thinset mix that will bond nicely to the pan.

be sure to get _any_ thinset off the tiles before it hardens, and work clean, cleaner than regular thinset.

That being said, I feel the epoxy thinset created an excellent bond, but i wouldn't want to work with it again.
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Old 01-14-2011, 09:16 AM   #11
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there are wall mounted toe rests for shaving pre-made. a google search will work
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Old 01-14-2011, 09:27 AM   #12
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Tom, an important consideration for a niche is waterproofing. Can we take one step back and ask if you're building a traditional shower with a liner & clamping drain...or are you building a shower with surface waterproofing like Kerdi, NobleSeal, etc...or.......?

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Old 01-14-2011, 09:37 AM   #13
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I think I remember reading that you have to have the dimensions of your shower just right in order to fit these in as well - which is a another major "con".

I considered one of these when I first started thinking about re-doing my bathroom, glad I went with a mud bed.
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Old 01-14-2011, 11:18 AM   #14
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Thanks for the replies. To clarify, I have built dozens of showers with the traditional mud base over the last few years. I am looking at transitioning to one of the newer approaches. I was considering the noble probase over the kerdi for this application then I saw the tile redi when I was looking for the niche link(for my foot rest question). As far as price goes by the time I build a mud base it's going to be about the same for materials and labor. Also the tile redi is more cost effective then the probase when considering the probase does not come with drain or curb. I am designing the bathroom for the customer so the size is not a factor. I didn't realize the tile had to be epoxied to the base.....so now I am probably going with the probase.

I am going to stick with cbu's and the laticrete green crack isolation waterproofing product for the walls. Can't think of the name right now...brain fart. I do want to switch to a pan that does not hold moisture.

I usually build benches for customers who want foot rest, but these folks don't want a bench...I am not to sure they will be to crazy about the corner trays pictured above either. Are those really sturdy? ie. not prone to break off. In truth I am not crazy about using a niche for this purpose. Any other recommendations would be appreciated.

Sorry for the ramblin' post...

Do you all feel the traditional mud bed is just as good as the newer methods in terms of life of shower and mildew and mold issues?

Thanks to all for the feedback!
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Old 01-15-2011, 03:11 AM   #15
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If you're cramped for space, a niche makes sense. But I'd build it into the framing before the walls are installed rather than a pre-made unit. Over-build it so it's more than strong enough for decades to come.

And you must be referring to Laticrete's Hydroban.

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