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Old 09-11-2003, 10:29 PM   #1
Alan Westerberg
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tiling under a heavy tub

We want to tile a deck surrounding a new 400 pound cast iron tub. It will be in a three walled alcove so it looks impossible to tile and later set the tub down into place. Are there any ideas of liftiing the tub and holding it just above the deck while the tile is installed. Later lowering it down. Someone suggested inflating inner tubes below and inflating them to lift it? We thought having tiles go under tub would be a cleaner looking installation than just tiling up to tub edge. Thanks for any suggestions.
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Old 09-12-2003, 05:15 AM   #2
Rob Z
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Hi Alan

Foir installations like that, I set the tub in place and level it, then build a plywood deck around the underside of the lip of the tub. This deck is built 1.5" t0 2" low (depending on thickness of the tile). Then, lath and deck mud are floated under the lip of the tub, leaving just enough for thickness of tile, setting material, and a bead of caulk. It is helpful to make a dam from lumber or up-turned lath at the edges of the plywood that slide under the rim of the tub. This dam will catch the mud and keep it from falling down under the tub.

Remember to hook up the waste and overflow before tiling!

Also, try to put something non-compressible under the feet of the tub to spread the load. I use pieces of iron brick lintel , but other things will work. 3" square is large enough to keep the feet from digging down into the plywood over time.
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Old 09-12-2003, 06:22 AM   #3
tileguytodd
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Iron Brick Lintel!!! Good one Rob,No wonder your a remodeling Master
Ive never had to deal with a 400# Tub Myself,I see one of them monsters and tell them ,hey,i'm a tile guy not a plumber
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Old 09-12-2003, 03:24 PM   #4
gof
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Another option when dealing with the tub feet problem is to set the tub in mortar. Position the tub, then lift it a few inches. Dump a batch of mortar sufficient to OVERFILL the gap between tub and floor. Then push (stand in gently, with a friend or two maybe) down on the tub to settle it back down until the feet just touch. Fill with water (you did hook the drain up, right ) and let the mortar set.

DON'T do this if you think you're going to change your mind on the tub next week
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Old 09-12-2003, 08:33 PM   #5
John Bridge
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Hello, Alan.

All good advice. I set the things (one or two per annum) and do it as Rob described. All except for the iron brick lintel. I've never seen iron bricks.
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