Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile Tile Monthly Magazine

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books   Buy a TYW Shirt

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-28-2007, 10:00 PM   #1
pamk
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 35
Smile How thick can thin-set be?

Hi all.
I have a new project. I have a 1960's bath that has a 16" deep home-made tiled tub/shower, about 16 square feet in area. I've already pulled up the old tiles on the floor of the tub and plan to leave the walls as they are. The old tiles were set on a mortar base. The bottom row of wall tiles is coved. I want to put river rock "tile" down, but want a steeper slope to make sure the floor will drain well. I'd like to raise the perimeter at least 1" and slope it down to the drain. What can I use to raise the floor of the tub area? thin-set? Cement? the sand/cement mixture "Mud" I used to slope my other bathroom? How much trouble can I expect if I cover up the coved part of the bottom row of tiles with the new pebble? I use laticrete expoxy grout, so I have a lot of confidence in the strength of the grout.
Thanks in advance for the advice. Pam
pamk is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 11-29-2007, 01:26 AM   #2
Deckert
Remodeling and Tile Contractor
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Kirkland, WA
Posts: 2,113
You can build up and patch your bed using thinset, but do it in several thin layers 1/4" ish, versus one thick layer.

If you need to build up a lot, you can thinset to your pan and add deck mud to that and build your slope how you want it.

But you're sure you dont want to pull it all out and do new waterproofing/pan/drain/trap/etc while you have it torn apart? If its from the 60's its probably time for it.
__________________
Brannigan
Facilities Manager, TPC Snoqualmie Ridge
Reformed Remodeler and C54 Tile Contractor
HeenanGC.com
Deckert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2007, 06:08 AM   #3
prashster
Registered User
 
prashster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 814
Not sure I understand yr scenario. I will say this: I wouldn't use thinset to build the floor up more than 1/8". All cements/thinsets/mortars/muds/concretes are a mix of cement, sand and aggregate. Thinsets/mortars/cements are light on sand and ag and heavy on cement. So, they bond well, but don't support weight well. They can crack if too thick. Deck mud is really appropriate for a 1" raise. DM has sand to make it stable. Concrete would have stones (aggregate) in it, which'd make it too lumpy for this app.

You can mix yr own deck mud from cement and sand (there are a bunch of refs to how to do this on this forum).
__________________
Shawn
Chronic DIYer
prashster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2007, 11:26 AM   #4
pamk
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 35
Thanks!

Thank you for the great advice. It all makes good sense. And, the advice to put thin set on to bond the mud to the current floor would have been my next question. You experts are ahead of me here.
Time to get busy!
Pam
pamk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2007, 01:40 PM   #5
prashster
Registered User
 
prashster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 814
Correction: i'm no expert, just repeating the advice given to me.
__________________
Shawn
Chronic DIYer
prashster is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Buy John's New Book!   Tile Your World Online Store   Contractors Direct Tile Tool Store   Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:35 PM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2009 John Bridge & Associates, LLC