Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books   Buy a TYW Shirt

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-09-2007, 10:27 AM   #1
Dougthefireman
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: St. Paul, MN
Posts: 3
grout instead of thinset?

Hi--

I'm finishing up a 3'x5' shower, following M. Bryne's instructions in his book. (By the way, wives don't like it when a one year project turns into a five year one. My wife now uses a "Doug conversion factor" for any completion times I give.) I need some advice. I've tried searches here and on google, I can't find the info I need.

1. Can I use grout instead of thinset mortar for setting a 2"x2" tile floor in the shower? I remember reading this could be done, but I can't find the reference. I'm worried that the thinset mortar will ooze between the tiles, and I won't have enough space for good grouting, causing irregular coloring and strength. I'm using gray Versabond thinset and Hydroment sanded grout, which is a bit darker than the gray thinset. Grout is more expense than thinset, but I've put enough time/money into this that a few more dollars won't make any difference.

2. When laying out the sheets of tile for the shower floor, the tile makes a nice symmetrical rectangle around the drain. The nearest point is .5", the farthest about 2" away. Can I fill this rectangle in with mortar instead of trimming tiles with a tile pincher? Will it look good? Strength/cracking issues?

Thanks, Doug
Dougthefireman is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 11-09-2007, 12:53 PM   #2
river-wear
Registered User
 
river-wear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Los Gatos, CA
Posts: 755
I'll bump you back up to the top with my 2 cents...

1) In some cases you can use grout to set tiles, but I'm not sure I'd want to do it on a shower floor. Someone else will be along soon to give a more definitive answer.

You could try what I used in my shower, after finding a pro here who uses the technique - grout the sheets of tile from the back before installing them, then set in thinset. You go back and fill in any holes in the grout the next day. My tiles were paper face-mounted so it was probably easier to hold the grout in that way, but I'm pretty sure the pics I saw here were mesh-mounted. (It was an all green-glass floor... I'll look for the post for you.)

2) What you described doesn't sound attractive. I'd cut the tiles to fit or adjust the layout.

Found the thread - see post #7:
http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/...2&page=1&pp=15
__________________
Michele (DIYer on hiatus from projects... for now)

"Happiness... it lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort." - FDR

Last edited by river-wear; 11-09-2007 at 12:58 PM. Reason: found thread
river-wear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2007, 01:08 PM   #3
johntrent
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Northeast Florida
Posts: 1,998
Hey Doug - I personally would not try to grout the tile before installing. I do understand your reasoning behind it but instead I would just use a 3/16" v notch trowel to keep thin set oozing to a minimum and then I use a finger nail brush to clean lines in between tiles up of any excess thin set. A toothbrush would work fine also. Use it wet to scrub the lines, then wipe tiles and lines clean with a wet sponge. I also would not try to grout in area's that should be tile - you will regret it later I believe. Spend the extra time necessary to pinch those tiles nice and clean around your drain - if you have a grinder it would be easier or better yet a wet saw. Practice on a piece or two first - it isn't that hard and you will definitely like the end result better.

I am sure the experts will be along shortly to confirm this....or even have better suggestions. Be sure to keep us posted and how about some pictures? They love it around here when they can see something !!!
__________________
John
johntrent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2007, 09:17 PM   #4
Mountain Tile
Tile Contractor -- Northeastern PA.
 
Mountain Tile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Phila Pa area
Posts: 3,103
Hi Doug, I would not recomend using grout to set the tile alone, how ever I have a little trick I use for small mosaics on shower floors. I will mix some of the grout in with the thinset to get it close to the grout color to reduce the thinset bleeding through. If it"s a light grout color, I"ll use white thinset, If it"s a dark grout color I"ll use grey thinset.
Mountain Tile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2007, 09:22 PM   #5
ceramictec
Tampa Florida Tile Contractor
 
ceramictec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 26,070
if you use the right notch trowel you wont have to worry about it oozing up through the joints.
and the little bit that does can be sponged off or a kind of wet hand brush
will wash/brush it out of the joints easily.

ps. cut the tile as tight as you can around the drain.
__________________
Brian
........
........Tampa Florida Tile Installation
..................Check out our Blog
Florida Installer of Laticrete HydroBan & HydroBarrier
....Florida Installer of Schluter Kerdi & Kerdi-Board
................."Waterproofed Tile Showers"
........Porcelain - Travertine - Ceramic - Glass Tile
ceramictec is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Buy John's New Book!   Tile Your World Online Store   Contractors Direct Tile Tool Store   Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:17 AM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2014 John Bridge & Associates, LLC