Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Welcome to John Bridge / Tile Your World, the friendliest DIY Forum on the Internet


Advertiser Directory
JohnBridge.com Home
Buy John Bridge's Books   Buy a TYW Shirt

Go Back   Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile > Tile & Stone Forums > Tile Forum/Advice Board

Sponsors


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-05-2003, 02:46 PM   #1
jackie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5
Hot Tub Deck Tile??

We are in the planning stage (well, actually just talking) of re-doing the hot tub deck. The sides are made of wood--but we want to do the top in tile. Not something that will be glazed and slippery. We'll put down plywood and concrete backer board on the supports, as on a floor, but what would be the best tile to use? The hot tub is out of doors; but we live in the Portland, Oregon area, which seldom sees temperatures below freezing for any amount of time. Any recommendations?? Thanks!
jackie is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 03-05-2003, 04:45 PM   #2
John Bridge
Mudmeister
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 64,852
Send a message via AIM to John Bridge
Hi Jackie, Welcome.

I'm familiar with the type of hot tub you have (I think). I've never tried it, so I have zero experience, but I would be afraid that the sides of the tub might not afford a top that is stable enough to tile. I think the wood (redwood?) might move about a little as the tub is used. Don't know. Let's hear what others might have to add.
John Bridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2003, 08:17 PM   #3
tileguytodd
Official Felker Fanatic
 
tileguytodd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Northern MN
Posts: 14,398
Hi Jackie,welcome to Our home away from work
Perhaps if you could post a picture of the tub,we could plan a little better on how many of us will help you
Kidding.A picture would help us to see what type of structure you have though.
__________________
TIP YOUR TILE MAN, His Retirement plan is not nearly as lucrative as yours and his waning years will be far more painful to boot.
He gives much so you can have a Beautiful Home!!
tileguytodd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2003, 08:45 PM   #4
cx
da Home-builder -- Moderator-at-Large
 
cx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Boerne, Texas
Posts: 74,369
Yep, gotta see a picher first. We like pichers.

Plywood and CBU for an exterior installation just doesn't sound like such a good idea to me, though.
cx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2003, 09:55 AM   #5
Scooter
Remodeler -- Southern Cal.
 
Scooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Southern California
Posts: 4,345
Tile on Top of Redwood

I wouldn't have a problem at all doing this IF the base was mud. I'd use no more than 2 inch mosiacs so the base wouldn't be slippery. Quarter round mud trim to conceal the edges.
__________________
Scooter
"Sir, I May Be Drunk, But You're Crazy, and I'll Be Sober Tomorrow"
WC Fields, "Its a Gift" 1934
Scooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2003, 09:46 PM   #6
leeshuck
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Dana Point, CA
Posts: 232
Check out http://www.pacificclay.com/.

They have several tile lines made for pool decks - I've seen it and it's quite nice. Was considering the Quarziti or Technoquartz for for my bathroom, but I think it's texture is a little too much for that.
leeshuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2003, 02:51 PM   #7
jackie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5
Okay, here is a picture of the hot tub. I can understand what some are saying about the base not being stable enough...but perhaps there is a way to brace it up, much as floors can be stabalized??

Now you know why it needs re-done :-)
Attached Images
 
jackie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2003, 04:34 AM   #8
John Bridge
Mudmeister
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 64,852
Send a message via AIM to John Bridge
Hi Jackie,

I would do a reinforced mortar bed, and I would waterproof it on the surface. Then tile it. I think it could also be done with cement backer board if the top is very, very sound.
John Bridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2003, 10:22 AM   #9
jackie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5
How do you waterproof the mortar bed?
jackie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2003, 10:53 AM   #10
bbcamp
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 30,305
A paintable/trowelable membrane can be applied. The tiles can be set on the membrane.


Do I see a cut out in the deck for a filter or some part of the plumbing?



BTW, I rebuilt my entire cabinet using pressure treated pine for the top frame and cedar for the sides. I don't have the flat surfaces in the corners that you have, and mine stays under a roof on my patio. The original cabinet was not built with water resistant materials and practically fell apart.
bbcamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2003, 11:52 AM   #11
jackie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5
Ah, thanks for the info. on the membrane--although that's about all I know about it for now.

Yes, there is a "door" on the foundation that gives access to the pump and filter. I suppose just about everything will be re-built. Or maybe I'll forget the tiling idea completely; don't want to put it under roof, you can't see the stars at night that way :-)

Thanks for everyone's input.
jackie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2003, 02:10 PM   #12
Bill Vincent
Tile Contractor
 
Bill Vincent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Bridgton, Maine
Posts: 8,637
The hot tub is out of doors; but we live in the Portland, Oregon area, which seldom sees temperatures below freezing for any amount of time

Jackie-- One thing to think about if you're going to do this in mud, which is actually the best way to do it, and that is to put in a drainage membrane under the mud. The problem you might have otherwise is that fact that although it's seldom for any length of time, it DOES get below freezing, and all it takes is a couple of hours, if there's any water or moisture in the mortar bed. If you put in a drainage membrane under the mud bed, the water has a place to go, rather than being trapped in the mud, and the installation won't fail.
__________________
Bill

"Whether you think you can, or you think you can't, you're probably right."

http://www.creativeceramicandmarble.com
Bill Vincent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2003, 07:21 PM   #13
John Bridge
Mudmeister
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 64,852
Send a message via AIM to John Bridge
Jackie,

Sorry for being so tight with information. We have to know where you're going before we write a book.

Laticrete makes a good surface applied waterproofer called "Laticrete 9235." They also sell a smaller version at Lowes.

http://www.laticrete.com

You either do the mud or the backer board and then put on the waterproofer. Thin set mortar, which is what you glue the tiles on with, will stick to the waterproofer.
John Bridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Buy John's New Book!   Tile Your World Online Store   Contractors Direct Tile Tool Store   Stonetooling.com   Tile-Assn.com


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:28 AM.


Sponsors

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2014 John Bridge & Associates, LLC