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Old 03-11-2007, 07:38 PM   #1
limin
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Necessary slope & curbless shower

As another part of my project I am building a master suite. In the bathroom area I have a hot soak tub adjacent to an open shower area with body sprays and hand held.

The tub including deck is 7 1/2 feet with the shower parallel and 4 1/2 x 7 1/2 feet. I have had a couple of different tile guys tell me different requirements on the necessary slope to the drain over the 7 1/2 feet. One told me 5 inches in height sloping continuously to the drain. The other told me 1/4" per foot, so about 2 inches. Thats a big difference.

What is the appropriate slope per foot needed?
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Old 03-11-2007, 07:51 PM   #2
Tool Guy - Kg
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I think I have this right that your shower is 4.5' x 7.5'.

The pitch for the floor (and drain pipes for that matter) is: 1/4" per foot. But the drain is usually located in the center of the shower area......if this is the case, the distance from the drain to the far corner would be a 4.2' and give you a floor height difference of just over 1".
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Old 03-11-2007, 08:34 PM   #3
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Dave - what Tonto said about the slope. And by that measure, in order to get a 5" drop you'd need to be 20 feet from the drain. I don't think so.

One thing to keep in mind is that if the floor is square and drain centered, the slope is equal all the way around. But if the drain is off-center or the floor is not square it's a different story. the 1/4" per foot is from the drain center to the wall furthest from the drain. yes, that means shorter sections of floor have more slope. The goal is to get the perimeter of the floor at the same height all the way around.
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Old 03-11-2007, 09:10 PM   #4
limin
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Thanks a bunch. The drain is offset, I should have said that. The guy that told me 1/4" per foot is very well respected in the community. The other guy, well, I won't let him back in my house.

Thanks for the help.
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Old 03-12-2007, 10:26 PM   #5
Tool Guy - Kg
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Maybe the other guy builds ski slopes when he isn't busy working on showers? Might explain things.
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