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Old 07-02-2006, 05:50 PM   #1
housefire
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Need help on buffing out light scratches on granite tile

Hi

I need some advice on how to buff out some light swirly scratches on dark granite. They were made when I was shaping the granite around an undermount sink.
You can't feel them, but they are visible. I went back & re-polished with 1500 grit, but that didn't make them go away, & neither did the 3000 grit or the buffing pad. I don't want to drop back down to 400 or 800 grit if there is a better way to get them out.
I've read about using polishing powders like tin oxide, but I don't know how one goes about using that stuff.
Any ideas?
Thanks!
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Old 07-02-2006, 06:18 PM   #2
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Hi Lissa

Polishing scratches out of dark stone is very difficult. It is easy enough to drop down low enough in the grits to get the scratches out, but bringing the surface back up to factory luster is the tricky bit.

Is this a tile top? If it is, I'd suggest you re-do the tiles. If it is a solid top, I'd suggest practising your polishing techniques on some scraps until you get a decent shine before attempting to fix the top.

You have to back down to 400 grit or below to remove the scratches and work your way back up to buff, being careful to remove all the scratch patterns from the grit before and working out in an ever increasing area to blend the fix into the surface.
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Old 07-02-2006, 06:30 PM   #3
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Hi

Yep - it certainly is tricky, however I think I've got the hang of it finally (I am very stubborn). I've gotten all of my tile edges to a really high sheen, but when I was rounding out my sink opening I accidentally got some swirlies on the surface. I just didn't know if I needed to drop down to a lower grit or if there was a simpler fix that I could use since you can't actually feel the swirls.

btw - I am in love with your marinace table/ counters! You mentioned that there was a marinace called "jurassic" - do you have any pictures of it? I would love to use that stone someday when we build our "forever" house.
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Old 07-02-2006, 07:47 PM   #4
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Thanks

Here is a picture of the Jurassic



and another really beautiful one, Aquarius (Blue Marinace, Blue Aquarius)



It also comes in black, red and gold
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Old 07-02-2006, 08:16 PM   #5
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Lissa,

Before you drive yourself to distraction working those tiny scratches you may want to take the easy way out with a little car wax and see how it suits you. I've nerer had the occasion to try it but I hear it can work quite nicely.

Use a tin oxide paste on a leather buff. Use it wet but not too wet. You want enough heat to flow the stone. It may work for you where 1500 didn't. You may also try cerium oxide but I have my doubts if your granite is closer to 7 moh.

Adriana,

That's some fine looking stone. What exactly is it and where does it come from?

Don

Last edited by DonB; 07-02-2006 at 08:21 PM.
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Old 07-02-2006, 11:03 PM   #6
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Thanks for the replies!
Don, I've heard about using tin oxide, I just didn't know how it was used. I might try backing down on the grits then working back up again and seeing what I end up with. I am pretty sure I will have to use polishing powder of some kind. If I end up using automotive polish of any kind I will have to disguise it from my husband - I've got him convinced that granite work requires special "stuff".

GraniteGirl - we are only 6 months apart in age (May '72)! I am loving the Jurassic & the Aquarius. Are slabs of that type of rock pricier than others? Is it hard to come by? It is so beautiful!
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Old 07-02-2006, 11:53 PM   #7
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Could also try a dark rouge on final polish with a felt or cotton wheel. It's a tough proposition to surface polish. I knew an old Italian slab guy that would tell me you have to polish every stone if you want it to match.


I was born in Nov 72.. but I'm a guy...does that exempt me from the club?
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Old 07-03-2006, 05:08 AM   #8
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All the stones in the Marinace family are meta-conglomerates dating from the Archean to Proterozoic geologic eras. Contrary to their apperance, they are all very dense, but some of the lower grade slabs could be prone to fissures, so look out for that when selecting slabs. Some slabs could come with a mesh backer (mostly 2cm), but that is not necessarily a bad thing.

These materials get quarried in Brazil and though they are fairly popular because of their appearance, they would fall in the higher priced category because of their extreme hardness. It is a superb material for use in a kitchen and requires virtually no upkeep. Mine have not been sealed - ever - and does not need to be either. It is not reactive to acids and does not absorb any oils.

Not being biased or anything - but '72 must have been one of the best years Trask, are you late enough in Novemebr to be a Sagittarius?
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Old 07-03-2006, 05:09 PM   #9
housefire
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Trask - of course you can join. The sign-up fee is only $200, so let me get you my address....


Adriana - do you know if any fossils get found in those slabs? I realize that the whole thing is a fossil, but I'm thinkin' bugs.....or sabertooth tigers...
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