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Old 03-24-2006, 08:14 AM   #1
Royal10
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Grout consistency

Hi
I will be grouting a tile floor this weekend and thought I would try and get some ideas on mixing grout. It is a grout from TEC. Warm Grey.

How much work should it be to actually grout. From past experience it seems as though the MFG's directions for mixing grout result in a more dry mixture making the actual grout process "work" to actually get the grout into the joints. Too wet is bad also. I know this but is there a general rule of thumb to know when the consistency is correct?

Are there any benefits to 9 vs. 12" float sizes

Thanks for the help
Ryan
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Old 03-24-2006, 08:45 AM   #2
mrjetskey
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grouting is easy mix it according to the instructions on the bag,it should be like cake icing ,if this is your first time mix about 1/4 of the bag at a time ,make sure you mix each batch the same,the most important thing is to mix it let it sit a few minutes then mix it again (called letting it slake).if not it wont have very long working time,also clean up as you go about every 15 minutes ,do not let the grout dry before you start to sponge it up,wipe one time with clean sponge turn it then wipe again rinse sponge.take your time ,be clean it pays off in a great job.12" grout float is fine for floor buy the good one not the cheap 4.00 one 12 to 15 dollars buys a pretty good float
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Old 03-24-2006, 08:52 AM   #3
Mike2
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Royal, in time you will know when the consistency is right just by swiping your margin trowel into the mixture and feeling the resistance. Practice is all it takes to get that "feel".

Now the question becomes, how to get to that point. If the mfg. ratios seem to yield a mix too dry, try bumping up the water by a few percentage points or ounces, whatever the case may be. Caution, towards the end of the mixing process a little water goes a long way.

Mixed right the work involved to pack it into the spaces should not be hard. Mixed right the grout will "move" with the float and into the spaces. Mixed right, tip the bucket over 45 deg. or so and the grout should begin to move or slump but not run out. Mixed right, I'm betting for most grout and environmental conditions the water to dry volume percentage is going to be in a range of 25 to 30%.


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Old 03-25-2006, 10:13 AM   #4
Rosetheweaver
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This is really helpful for a beginner like me - especially the proportions from Mike2. Roughly four to one? Hmmm. Almost sounds like a good martini (mixed right)!
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Old 03-29-2006, 07:29 AM   #5
Royal10
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Grout is done

I finished the grouting. Your advice helped. Thanks a bunch The grout seemed much thinner that what I am used to but we'll see what it looks like after it is fully cured.

One quick question. What type of floats are most common and easiest to use? I tried two. One was a spongey rubber float(9"). One material throughout. The other was stiffer with a finer edge(12"). This float was more difficult to use. Probably due to the stiffness and the fact that I am no pro but I was unable to create good grout lines with it.
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Old 03-29-2006, 08:44 AM   #6
Mike2
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In my opinion you want a float which will allow you to fully pack the joint quickly, leaving it smooth, flush with the tile's surface and with minimal residue left behind on the tile. These are hand tools and like other situations, what works best for one person may not work best for another. My experience is those soft spongy floats leave too much material behind, exacerbating cleanup. I'm with jetskey, spend $10 to $15 and buy the best gum rubber faced float available.

One size does not fit all. With a small 2"x6" margin type float along with an 9" to 10" quality float (gum rubber face bonded to a dense rubber pad) I'm betting most all of your DIY needs will be covered.

Note: Epoxy floats are different, usually color coded and designated as such. They will have an even denser face and pad to facilitate spreading that thicker material.

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Old 03-29-2006, 12:16 PM   #7
slb
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Quote:
Roughly four to one? Almost sounds like a good martini (mixed right)!
Mmmm! Now your talkin'. You just made me wish it was Friday already.
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