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Old 08-12-2001, 04:43 PM   #1
John Bridge
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There has been a little talk of woodworking around here, and I notice that a few people have included it as a hobby in their profile. I've been after it since junior high, and I've converted my garage into a wood shop. Thought you all might like to see what I consider to be my most challenging project -- a pair of oak barstools. Well, there's only one in the pic.

Sonnie and Kelly,

The back is made in the fashion you discussed in a previous post. There are 14 one-eigth inch layers in the lamination. The 5/4 red oak was picked up from discarded stair tread material on one of the "castles" I worked on. I got enough scrap off the one job to make two stools.

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Old 08-12-2001, 06:10 PM   #2
Harry
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Great John!

I admire those who are able to work with hardwood, and that old discarded wood you used probably has a nice, defined grain to work with because of its age. I'm still playing with pine which is much more forgiving, I'm a little reluctant to graduate on to oak etc.

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Old 08-12-2001, 06:16 PM   #3
Bud Cline
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"NORM"!!!

"Whoops sorry that's another show".

"Actually, sorry again, that's two other shows".

Once again John I must effervesce, or whatever that big word was you used, made a few cabinets over the years but never anything as neat as that stool.

Had a lathe once but got hurt right away and sold it.
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Old 08-12-2001, 06:17 PM   #4
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John

Jana just noted that she likes your chair and that it is the same color as our chairs in our kitchen.

Jana's Dad
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Old 08-12-2001, 07:51 PM   #5
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Nice work John, the backrest must have taken some time to do..huh?
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Old 08-12-2001, 10:57 PM   #6
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Gotta admit that looks damn fine for a tile man!

Tell me, John, are there two stools in the picture sometimes? Just curious.

Harry:
Don't consider Pine easier to work with than Oak until you give it a try. Red Oak is one of my very favorites woods, it's hard, but not difficult.

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Old 08-14-2001, 09:46 AM   #7
Sonnie Layne
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JP,
Nice barstool, it doesn't even look like it's hit the floor too many times.
Can see the laminations. Nice joinery all 'round. Love the seat. Not a bad tile job, either. {}

I get a sneaky feeling that most of us on this forum are multi-talented. Nice to hang around folks like that.

I once salvaged enough Red Pine (now all but extinct in NC Texas) from a house I re-trimmed to build a dresser and chest of drawers. Ate up 3 sets of knives on my planer just getting the paint off, but with that much material stripping was out of the question. Wish Peel-Away was around then, I would have saved the knives.

Just curious, how did you manage the dish-out on the seats? Don't tell me... Craftsman screwdriver???

[Edited by Sonnie Layne on 08-14-2001 at 10:58 AM]
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Old 08-14-2001, 11:29 AM   #8
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Good job John.I too am a lover of fine craftsmanship.My Dad and I had a wood-working shop set up in his garage.We made potato bins,trashcans,shelves,etc.I did a lot of work with no nails or screws just dowels and biscuits.It's been a long time.I moved back up home(Tennessee)in '95 and Dad & Mom still live in Florida.Never did do anything to compare with your work though.

Sonnie,I think you are right about the multi-talented thing.Luckily I was raised to do for myself.My Dad is one of,if not THE,most talented people I know.I have yet to know of anything he can't do or figure out how to do.
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Old 08-14-2001, 04:58 PM   #9
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I suspect the fact that we are all (except for Art) multi-talented is the reason we are all so wealthy (except for
Art).

The seats are actually flat -- no scooping). I've made all manner of things based on planes, and quite frankly it's not a challenge anymore. Making a chair, though, is something that will occupy your mind. There is no amount of arithmetic that will tell you the compound angles of the spindle/seat tenons, the rail/leg joints, etc. It's trial and error. And by the time you get it figured out, the project is complete.

Harry, Kelly,

I still make things from white pine. It is the most beautiful wood in the world. I'll try to take a picture of our dinette set, made from multi-specie 2x4s I got at Home Depot years ago.
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Old 08-14-2001, 06:49 PM   #10
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Hi John

I like to work with wood, as well. If my garage wasn't filled up with all the stuff for a tile setting and remodeling business, i'd have a nice woodshop to play in. Maybe some day....

My friend Joe is a handrail specialist. He has a gizmo that allows him to drill and route out holes, mortises, etc at various angles for stair parts. It's an expensive tool, but it is really sweet. Kelly probably has seen these things. Maybe something like that can be adapted for chair parts?

Have you ever seen Roy Underhill (PBS's "The Woodwright's Shop) making chairs by hand , with the old methods? He has some of those old scoop type planes that were used to scallop out the bottoms of chairs. Very interesting.

Christina and I like Mission Style furniture. Have you ever made any? If so, how about some pics?
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Old 08-14-2001, 07:56 PM   #11
kalford
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Rob,
The "scoop type plane" you see Roy using is a "Cooper's In-Shave". It is design for scooping out chair seats,bowls or anything that needs hollowed out.John,this is another thing that Lehman's sells.Some other wood working tools they have are; Straight and curved Drawknives,Hand Gouging Adze(for roughing out seats etc.)Froes,Breast Drills,Mortising/Framing Chisels,Spoke Shaves,Carpenter's Adze.....the list goes on.I have several Drawknives and Spokeshaves.Don't get many chances to use them.
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Old 08-14-2001, 08:38 PM   #12
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Hi Keith

The neatest part of Roy's show (I think) is seeing the old tools and how things were done way back when before power tools. Another thing I thought was cool-the various planes with different profiles, for the days before routers.

Rob
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Old 08-14-2001, 10:58 PM   #13
chip
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Ouch, ouch, ouch,ouch,ouch!!!!!

Dang, John, that hurt. My reputation precedes me once again.

I sure wish I had your money, I could burn mine.

Nice chair, I've sat in chairs before. I think they were wood, could have been plastic. I never could tell the difference.

The local grocery store "Publix" has plastic Adirondack chairs for sale, I always get a kick out of them.

Now lets see you make one of those, the old fashioned way!?

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Old 08-14-2001, 11:32 PM   #14
Sonnie Layne
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Adirondacks are no prob. Just get a stump of red tide cypress and start gnawing away with a craftsman screwdriver.

What I hate is the elfishness of folks who want to finish a beautiful piece of work with urethane. Visit http://www.shellac.com to get a bit of modern day advice. Or just take my word for it. Technology has even infiltrated a thousand years into our past. Where will we stop it? Never, I should hope.

Hey, you think we could sweet talk those laq beetles into contributing further to a waterproof membrane for mud men/tile setters?

Damn, I just remembered ballrooming in a casino along the gold coast just south of Brisbane with an adorable Aussie lady from Kenmore. Don't guess any of our Aussie guests are around to breath out the flames of the Jacarandas for me, eh? Aah, well, c'ie le vie. Kohn se mohn.

Brought by stars,
lost by moonlight,
and happily yet I stand
lost in the starlight,
wishing by moonbeams
that I held her heart
in my hand.


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Old 08-18-2001, 04:05 PM   #15
Harry
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John, you keep opening doors that I just can't resist going through. So here goes ..... and thanks John for allowing us the opportunity for a little "show n' tell". This is my most recent project (my wife did the stained glass panels in the upper doors), my next venture is a "harvest table".



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