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Old 03-01-2005, 04:01 PM   #1
Albert
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sticky resilient rice mortar

i got a new sticky mud recipe. they've been using it in china for thousands of years to make the mortar more "resilient." i guess they didn't have latex admix back then...

http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/science...eut/index.html

================
BEIJING, China (Reuters) -- Rice fills the bowls on many Chinese tables -- and also the cracks in its ancient buildings, and maybe even the Great Wall, Xinhua news agency reported.

"The legend that ancient Chinese craftsmen used glutinous rice porridge in the mortar while building ramparts has been verified," it said in a report seen on Monday.

Archaeologists researching an ancient wall around the city of Xi'an, a former imperial capital and home to the famed terra cotta warriors, were stumped by the ingredients of a resilient mortar holding bricks together.

The hardened paste reacted similarly to glutinous, or sticky, rice in chemical tests, Qin Jianming, a researcher with the Xi'an Preservation and Restoration Center of Cultural Relics, was quoted as saying.

"Thus we can conclude that the sticky material was in the mortar," Qin said.
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Old 03-01-2005, 05:21 PM   #2
John Bridge
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Having been married to a Korean in another life and having fairly extensive experience with rice (in all its forms) I can easily see how this can be true. Leave the stuff in your rice cooker overnight and try to get it out. I dare you.
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Old 03-01-2005, 07:01 PM   #3
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i didn't know you had a korean connection. have you ever had the korean soup that is essentially boiled water with pieces of burned rice in it? it's probably made by putting water in the rice cooker with the stuck rice and boiling it until the rice breaks loose from the sides. yuck. i guess you can boil it down and make a mortar additive.

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Old 03-01-2005, 09:36 PM   #4
Splinter
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Nothing is worse than Kim Chi... Ferment some cabbage with tomatoes in a jar on the back deck all summer long, and then eat it... Smells as bad going in, as it does coming out....
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Old 03-01-2005, 09:55 PM   #5
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The tricky part is using the chop sticks to apply the mortar
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Old 03-01-2005, 11:27 PM   #6
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It's no worse than using liquid soap as a plasticiser in mortar. An added advantage to the rice is that when thems agin apply far to yer walls the mortar gets stronger
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Old 03-01-2005, 11:39 PM   #7
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Alex,
I gotta challenge you on that one. I was raised on kim chee and rice. There are all sorts of different types of kim chee. Some are spicey and some are just pickled. There's the well-lnown napa cabbage variety and then there are radishes and potatos and cucumbers and all sorts of other sturdy vegetables. A good Korean restaurant will serve you a handful of them as appetisers as soon as you sit down. Ask for the fermented black beans and the dried anchovies also.
"Kim chee ji gae" is soup that you make from kim chee "after it's gone bad". Now THAT is an interesting flavor.
Using rice glucous in the mortar is pretty tricky chemistry for 2 thousand years ago. I'm curious to learn more about how a practice like that might have gotten started. Following routines back to their origins is kinda fascinating to me.
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Old 03-02-2005, 06:47 AM   #8
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My favorite Korean Dish would have to be "BulKogi"(marinated beef slices in sesame soy brown sugar concoction with sesame seeds.Very Rich and very tasty.A bit tedious to make but i'll gaurantee no leftovers no matter how much you make
1# Beef thinly sliced-cut with the grain while still partially frozen
4 Tbsp-Brown Sugar
2 Tbsp-Sesame Oil
6 Tbsp-Soy sauce
1-speck of pepper
2-Green onions tops and all
1-Clove Garlic
4-Tbsp-Sesame seeds
1-Tbsp Flour
1/4 cup Water
Mix Sugar,oil,soy sauce,pepper,flour,water, sesame seeds heat to blend.Add Chopped onion,chopped garlic to sauce and allow flavors to blend for a few minutes while slicing beef.Put Beef in a glass or porcelain Bowl and add sauce to beef slices stirring it in well.Let marinade 16 hours Minimum.
Using a Foil covered cookie sheet,broil slice 1-2 minutes per side.Serve immediatly.

This stuff is to die for
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Old 03-02-2005, 07:00 AM   #9
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Bul Go Ki is always a dish I order, especially if I've brought a novice along. Even if they don't like Korean, they love Bul Go Ki. When I make it at home, I prefer corn startch in place of flour and I'll add a dollop of spicy black bean paste to give it a little "sweet heat". "Gal bee" is a similar dish except that it's made with short-ribs.
Most Korean restaurants will either have hibachi grills built into the tables or they will bring portable ones to you for self-grilling. Personally, I find that it's more fun than going to Benihana's and I like the flavors better too.
Damn, now I want Korean food and it's only 5AM.
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Old 03-02-2005, 07:48 AM   #10
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Shaughnn- I admit I dont know much about Kim Chee... (sorry about the spelling earlier) A few years back I did a job for a korean family who had jars of this on their back deck. It was fermenting in a wooden crate lined with aluminum foil. Since I work just on recommendations, I wound up working for several friends of theirs, and all had the same setups...

I think it was about the 3rd korean customer who had a fridge full of this stuff in their basement. I just opened the door to put my bottle of Pepsi in, and was overwhelmed by the smell of this stuff. (I abandoned the pepsi in there) At that point, I was sure I'd never try the stuff until the next customer was having some and offered me a small bowl of it. I wont give details, but I was not a happy camper the next day...
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Old 03-02-2005, 08:09 AM   #11
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Alex,
I'm not saying it doesn't smell like a sulphurous pit in Hell. I'm just saying that it's a damn tasty ethnic experience if you've got the stomach and the curiousity to go there. My wife and I are re-watching the Bravo series "Long Way Round" currently. In it, Ewan MacGregor and Chalie Boorman ride motocycles from London to New York City, the long way around. Along the way, they eat with local peoples. I am not looking forward to the Mongolian sheep-nut stew scene. Thought it might have been a huge pot of gnocci until Boorman threw up. That's an ethnic dish I won't be trying any time soon. But I'm sure it tastes just fine.
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Old 03-02-2005, 12:51 PM   #12
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shaugnn, i'm with you on kimchee ji-gae. i love that soup. it is killer spicy and it will cure any hangover. bulgoki is good; kalbi is better. i think most non-koreans would like all of the other types of kimchee better than the napa cabbage kind. many koreans use separate refrigerators for their kimchee. they probably looked at splinter funny when he tried to put his pepsi in there with the kimchee. probly made em laugh all day.

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Old 03-02-2005, 08:29 PM   #13
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So much for rice mortar, eh?

Kal-bee ribs are the best. That's for sure. Very labor intensive, though. It's all in the prep.

As to Kim-chee, it's all good once it's decanted. Most Korean-American families have two refrigerators, one is dedicated to Korean food.

And Kim-chee is not the worst. The worst is Koh-ching-jong, aka Korean ketchup. Tell 'em, Shaughnn.
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Old 03-02-2005, 08:47 PM   #14
Eric Philson
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You guys think rice would make good mortar...in 1980 when I was in high school a buddy of mine, one day at lunch, launched a glob of peanut butter onto the cafeteria wall about 12 feet off the floor. It was still there in 1986. Just goes to show Americans can do anything asians can do...butter...er...better.
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