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Old 08-09-2004, 11:16 PM   #1
Crickett
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How should I finish this tile job?

I'm alllllmost done with tiling the shower, but I don't know how to finish the tops of the columns of quarter rounds. I should have figured this out before I started, but, well, being a newbie at this tile thing, I didn't. Help! There are two spots, see picture. Does anyone have a picture of what I should do?
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Last edited by Crickett; 08-09-2004 at 11:23 PM. Reason: to add the picture
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Old 08-09-2004, 11:40 PM   #2
Shaughnn
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Hey there Cricket, it's a fairly simple solution. You have two choices when finishing 1/4-round trim. You can use a special piece of trim called a "beak". There are "beaks" that are the full length of the 1/4-round and there are beaks that are only the width of the 1/4-round itself. The other solution is to cut a mitre from the 1/4-rounds that you have. You can do this by using a "speed square" as a mitre guage against the cut fence of your wet saw. But don't lay the tile flat when you cut it or that will throw off the angle of the tile that is supposed to curve around the mudfloat or CBU. Instead, prop it up against the speed square and cut it in the position that it would be sitting on your wall. Here's a picture of me cutting a different angle (it's a 45-degree mitre instead of a 90-degree mitre).
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Old 08-10-2004, 12:00 AM   #3
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After seeing your picture, I think that you want to ask your supplier for a full length 1/4-round "beak". If he or she doesn't know what you are talking about, ask for an "AC-106" in the color of your field tile. Is that's not available in your tile selection, try asking for an "AU-106"
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Old 08-11-2004, 11:00 AM   #4
Crickett
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Thanks Shaughnn

Thanks for the ideas. I'm getting a beak for the one spot because they don't make the quarter round/beak piece. However, the other one is still a mystery. My husband (the tile cutter) was confused about how to make the other piece that goes around the corner. Do you have a picture of what the finished piece would look like? The guy at the tile store was no help because he couldn't picture what I was trying to do though it seemed so clear to me! This will be the laaaaast piece of tile and we are really looking forward to finishing this!
Thanks.
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Old 08-11-2004, 07:45 PM   #5
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Cricket, I think you got yourself into a bad spot on that other cut by using surface bullnose at the top. Surface bullnose and quarter-rounds (which are primarily used only in mud work) don't mate up too well. You might end up fingering a little grout on top of the last quarter-round. Don't tell Shaughnn I said that, though. He'll get impatient with me.
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Old 08-11-2004, 07:48 PM   #6
John Bridge
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Had a better idea. Grind off the top of the quarter-round to the shape of the surface cap. Then paint it. Water isn't going to be a problem up there.
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Old 08-11-2004, 08:06 PM   #7
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::tap,tap,tap:::
Mr. Bridge has the right idea, but see if you can find a nail polish to match the glaze of your tile. Nail polish seems to be more durable that simple paint, though the color selections are a tad on the "gaudy" side.
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Old 08-11-2004, 09:52 PM   #8
Crickett
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Thanks again folks. Naturally the way we did things got us into trouble. Sheesh! I will be wiser on the choice of nail polish, something I have a little bit more experience with!
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Old 08-11-2004, 11:15 PM   #9
trecile
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I know it is too late now, but it looks like you could have saved yourself some aggravation and money by not having to buy those bullnose tiles if you had tiled all the way to the ceiling.
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Old 08-11-2004, 11:26 PM   #10
Crickett
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We considered that, but decided not to because one row ended about an inch from the ceiling and it would have looked bad with a half inch of tile. Using bullnoses was an aesthetic decision which has come back to bite us. There weren't many choices, though. Oh well. I've learned to respect tilers!
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