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Old 12-06-2017, 11:09 AM   #1
argile_tile
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How do I prepare floor (after failing tile)?

BACKGROUND: I tiled over a room in a concrete basement with cheap tile and thinset directly onto painted floor - for a large variety of reasons - removed it.

For anything except a cheap carpet job , I need to provide a base for flooring. The concrete floor is just to wavy to accept. (noting basement has flooded and gets mold problems in past, will on rare plumbing issues again)

I have a painted basement concrete floor, roughly 20'x50'. It was not laid too well it is full of highs and lows and width varies 1/2", length varies 1" to maybe 2" on the level. I'm sure first step is to remove (sand off) paint.

My QUESTION is: how to best level the floor (not necessarily DiY). I don't think I have the skill to screed the floor myself without a master teaching me. Technique 1: use floor leveling, floor patch, floor sanding to "get a 4' level smooth". Technique 2: Screed about 2"-4" of concrete onto old concrete (stripped) (floating or not screed is wise?). For Tq2 I wonder if I can hire someone who has a (machine) that lays a good flat floor or even a finish floor (like stores have, that can be waxed).

So question is technique. There are many ways to "fix a bad concrete floor". I'm wondering what anyone things is best for cost and best for future.
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:29 AM   #2
jadnashua
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The first thing that has to be done is remove the paint, and the best way to do that is with a scarcifier (essentially, a concrete floor grinder/sander). That can handle removing some of the high points as well. Do not use chemicals to remove the paint...it will create a bond-breaker for the tile/cement, similar to the paint. If you can accept a flat, but not necessarily level floor, that may get you there.

What would probably be the fastest, but most expensive way to level it would be with self-leveling cement (SLC), but on a large area like that, it would be better to pay someone to do it that has a pump verses mixing up numerous batches. SLC doesn't really self-level...it needs help. Failure is expensive.

I've never done a large mudbed, but that would likely be the least expensive, at least in materials. Because areas would end up fairly thin, you'd want to do a bonded mudbed verses a floating one.

Ceiling height can become an issue, and if there are stairs coming into the area, adding much may result in having to rebuild the stairway to keep the variation in steps within code limits.
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Old 12-06-2017, 12:29 PM   #3
argile_tile
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Soffit and ceiling my situation is 88" from concrete to bottom of joist.

Before I remove paint I may contact potential contractor for advice. I have a dewalt 5" diamond wheel / cup and a wire brush cup to use.

I've built stairs before. Easy job but wood price runs up for the thicker+longer stock wood required, as you said it is a job cost consideration.
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Old 12-06-2017, 03:54 PM   #4
jadnashua
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A hand tool like that grinder can get the paint off, but it would be nearly impossible to try to get the floor flatter with it given the situation you described. You really need a heavier duty machine. Something like this...some rental shops will carry them.
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