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Old 09-22-2017, 07:01 PM   #31
WillK
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Yes it's connected to the house DWV, but no I don't have a trap primer.

... Well, maybe I do. I have 50/50 custody of 3 floor drain trap primers currently age 9, 10 and 12.

I've already passed plumbing rough inspection, pretty sure I don't have a code requirement for a trap primer.
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Old 10-09-2017, 07:51 AM   #32
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Just thought I would put in a quick progress update. Just to recap, the shower is part of a project including a new bathroom, a new laundry room and a new coat closet in an area that was a poorly configured kitchen. I've passed rough inspection and the step I am working on currently is hanging drywall and cbu.

With soffits in the hallway and closet for structural reasons, so it has driven a lot of work cutting pieces of drywall for the details, and I've started taping in the closet because I need to get the closet into use so I can remove another closet...

Anyway, I have most of the bathroom drywall and cbu hung. I have to finish screws on a couple pieces, I need to finish the niches, footrest surface and soffit.

I have 6 mil poly sheet on the exterior wall only. I will be redgarding the shower pan.

With so much cbu fun, I just said forget it to scoring the board and I am taking them outside and going to town with a circular saw.
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Old 10-10-2017, 09:27 AM   #33
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Okay I'm getting to a point where I'm going to need to construct the shower pan... I saw the how to article here, but it has a dead link to an Ontario tile website. The method sounds different than the one at this link which is what I had been figuring on using:

http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/diy-...torials-200302

I grabbed a fresh pic this morning, unfortunately a little bit cluttered with tools, of the present state of the area I'll be working... I need to secure my floor CBU and I'll be taking out the floor heat cable since I need to reconfigure it anyway to take out the cable under the toilet and extend the excess cable futher back on the sides of the toilet.

My plan is to cast the curb, then the floor, then give it 3 days to cure, then redgard.

At any rate, one question I had was if I should bother with CBU under the shower floor inside the curb, or just make my sloped mortar floor directly on the OSB subfloor?

Anything wrong with just casting the whole shower curb from mortar as the link I provided describes? Is there anything I should do that will ensure I can release the wood form for the curb?

Here's the shower door I intend to install, which probably isn't too necessary for discussing how-to, really I mostly want to keep a link handy so I can go back to it for dimensions:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Delta-35-...2061/203431139
http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdf...5a10884ed2.pdf
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Old 10-11-2017, 09:00 AM   #34
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Pardon the terminology, I'm not sure if it's the right term but in my mind I call what I got done yesterday that I cast the shower curb. If there's a more appropriate term I'd like to know what it is, but at any rate here's the pic.
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:16 PM   #35
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Will, please don't pay too much attention to that article you linked, especially the treatment of the drain and their advice to "level" the curb top.

You want to use a clamping drain and the "divot" method of creating your sloped shower floor for the proper use of your RedGard receptor liner (which I recommend against).

You cannot just paint your waterproofing membrane up to the edge of a floor drain (not a shower drain) as shown in their article.

The top of your curb must be sloped at least 1/4" per foot to the drain. It must not be level as they recommend.

Your curb looks like it's gonna be pretty thick. Maybe that's just the appearance in the photo?

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 10-12-2017, 07:59 AM   #36
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I read comments on the article so I did a lot more searching around to take in a number of Youtube videos, and in particular I made it a point to watch installation videos from Custom Building Products, the manufacturer of Redgard.

I put about 1/8" slope into the top of the curb as well.

The area that left me a little unsure was just what the thickness of the mortar bed should be... One source lead me to believe I ought to have the mortar bed 2" thick at it's lowest point, and by my calculations that would've meant I'd need more than 2 bags of mortar... It also would not have left more than 1" of curb height, which didn't sound right because I think I'm supposed to have more than that.... I felt like there's a lot of conflicting info out there.

At any rate, I went with a floor mortar bed thickness that I was able to get with 1" mortar. I put a line at 1.5" on the side wall so I could use it as a guide and I ended up fairly close, I did have a 1/4" per foot slope and I checked all the way around with a level to ensure it looked like the bubble was at least always indicating slope towards the drain, but to my surprise I actually got the slope pretty consistent.

The curb width does look wider than it is from my previous photo just because of the mortar slopping all over the top of the 2x4 frame. The curb is 4" wide.

The outside wall of the curb frame was sitting mostly 1/2" hardiboard, the angled part was sitting on top of 1/4" hardiboard with the floor heat guide bracket so it worked out to be about 5/8" above the subfloor. I cut 3/8" off the bottom of the outer frame boards so they would end up slightly higher than the inner frame boards, and I verified slope towards the drain was present with a level and that the boards themselves were level.

I understood the guide to mean that the framework needs to be level in the direction of the glass shower walls so that you don't have gapping to the glass.

One other thing that stood out for me from watching the manufacturer's videos that I didn't pick up from the apartmenthterapy guide was the suggestion to coat your corners with redgard, then apply fiberglass mesh tape and then another redgard coat to embed the tape.

I think I might have mentioned this before, but for this shower drain as well as 2 floor drains I'm putting in the tiled floor I do already have clamping type drains designed for tile floor applications. I recognized the drain they showed is really more for something like a cement basement floor.

Takeout bowl from Panda Express worked just right as a cover to keep mortar from falling into the drain pipe.

For my next step following the parts of the guide that seem to make sense, I'll be letting this cure for 3 days. In that time, I'll get my floor heat cable rerouted and get that embedded in leveling compound, I'll start dragging myself through the process of taping drywall joints throughout the project, and I'll get the floor for the hallway and maybe the laundry room tiled so I can use some of that thinset to fill my joints at the seat and wall corners ahead of Redgard application.

Today's photo shows the floor mortar bed in place.
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Old 10-12-2017, 08:19 AM   #37
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Oh, here's a question that came up from the videos... Based on the 3 days curing time before I apply Redgard, I should be able to apply the Redgard on Saturday and I could water test it on Sunday which means I could get my plumbing inspection Monday (in order to get that, I need to call no later than 3 PM Friday, but I just set it up for Monday).

My question is about the leak test... When I had my plumbing rough inspection, I thought it sounded like it would be running water to make sure it runs down to the drain. One of the videos I watched, they put a test plug in the drain and filled the shower pan, marked a line and checked it 24 hours later... I don't mind doing either test or both for my own satisfaction, but is one of the other that which is usually expected?

I know I ought to direct the question to my AHJ, but he is on vacation and they will have somebody filling in for him, so if I leave a voicemail or a message I probably won't get an answer before inspection.
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Old 10-12-2017, 01:31 PM   #38
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Both are usually expected, Will. The code compliance inspector should require the receptor be filled with water up to the top of the curb and be left in that condition for a minimum of 24 hours. How he knows you've actually done that is always a mystery.

When he arrives for the inspection, he should require that you unplug the shower drain and he'll want to see that all the water runs out of the shower with none remaining in significant puddles.

What will actually happen depends upon the jurisdiction and the individual inspector.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 10-16-2017, 10:03 AM   #39
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Progress update from the weekend with one question below:

So I would characterize my Redgard application as of the scheduled permit leak test inspection I had set up for this morning as being almost ready. That obviously means I'm not ready, I postponed until the next day my wife can take a vaction day (she already has one planned for other appointments) on Friday.

I had a busy schedule over the weekend, and one delay kind of cascaded into the next. Friday evening I was still waiting for my shower mortar bed to cure (I was going for 72 hours, it had been around 60) so my goal was to pour the self leveling compound to embed the floor heat cable. This turned into a lesson of reading the instructions ahead of time, I read the instructions for the SLC and learned something new - they want a laytex primer applied first, which I did not have on hand and it was after HD closed. So, the project was at a stand-still until Saturday morning. (Ahead of all this, I got my floor heat cable re-laid so that it's no longer under the toilet, as can be seen in the attached photo)

Saturday morning I intended to stay home from a birthday party that I expected my daughter to not go to because she has ballet class at the same time while my wife took the other 2 kids to the party, and I expected to use that time to apply the Redgard. Nope, daughter decided to go to the party instead so we all went, and I was left with the afternoon to work and that was mostly going to HD to get primer, then finishing CBU cutting for the shower niche (oh yeah... I forgot I had all the walls done, but I need to finish CBU in the niches... And I finished the soap niche that's within the bottom 3', the other 2 niches are above the 3' so I haven't finished them yet and it's on my to-do list) I got some of the Redgard in the corners with fiberglass mesh, but that's as far as I would get on Saturday.

After that, we had planned a visit to my mom in Ohio overnight, then rush back to another soccer game Sunday afternoon, and then I had more time to work. By 8 PM I had at least 2 coats of Redgard on the shower floor, curb and the bottom 3' of shower wall, but some of the corners weren't fully dried and I saw a few pinholes I still wanted to hit with another coat.

Strictly speaking, even if I was ready at 8 PM last night, I'd be cheating on a 24 hour leak test if I tried to pass it off this morning. One other reason to put off the test, I also remembered I have a piece of the plug form the toilet flange that fell into the new pipe and if I drain water from the shower, it could wash that piece further into the system. I need to open up the pipe to remove that piece before it gets further downstream and potentially gets stuck in pipe under the basement floor.

Question:

My plan is to coat the areas I think are weak again, then I'd like to use up the rest of my gallon somewhere. So my question is would it be better to use that 1/4 gallon of redgard on the shower wall further up or add another coat to what is already there? (I have poly sheet behind the CBU on the exterior wall.) OR would it be better to use it around the floor drain after SLC?

Pictured is the redgard after the last coat applied before it dried. I haven't yet taken a pic after drying.
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Old 10-16-2017, 11:47 AM   #40
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What is the significance of the three feet up the walls, Will? Do you not plan to waterproof above that?

I see no evidence of any filling and taping of the CBU seams per the manufacturer's instructions. Why is that?

No social calendar, please, it confuses the shower construction details.
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Old 10-16-2017, 01:04 PM   #41
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I'm trying to get this done and otherwise my weekends should be more productive, but anyway...

I thought I read somewhere that I have to have the waterproofing 3' up the walls, elsewhere I've read 3", if the guideline is 3' I'm covered, if the guideline is 3" then going to 3' covers the 3".

I haven't done all of the joints yet because if I just mix up a bag of mortar to fill CBU joints I'm going to waste it, I'll fill and tape the joints the next time I'm setting tiles which most likely will be the hallway. And if the best use of the rest of the Redgard is over those CBU corners then that drives me to set the hallway tiles next so I can get that joint filled.

If the best place to use up the tiles is another layer where I have it already, that drives me to do that before the leak test. The leak test for the permit is Friday, but I could do my touchup tonight and run a 24 hour test starting tomorrow with time to fix any leaks on Wednesday and still fill the shower with water Thursday morning to be ready on Friday.

If the floor drain after SLC is the best place to use the Redgard, then I'm going to primer the floor and pour SLC next.
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Old 10-16-2017, 01:20 PM   #42
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Will, the requirement for wall waterproofing in a shower is that it rise at least above the shower head supply pipe. And that's especially true with the niches you have in those walls.

The three-inch requirement you may be referring to is that the pan liner in a traditionally built shower receptor must rise at least three inches above the top of the curb and has nothing to do with the wall waterproofing. Does not apply at all to the type of shower you're building.

Buy more RedGard if you need more to do the shower as it's supposed to be done. It should extend on the walls past the front of the curb and on the front of the curb, too, for best results.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 10-18-2017, 08:27 AM   #43
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Hallway tile laid so I had a batch of thinset mortar I could also use to fill the joints where I need to apply Redgard the rest of the way up the shower walls.

This evening the plan will be to Redgard the joints that need another coat, then apply the primer where I need to put in SLC. Then I'll make a supply run and pour the SLC.

This will allow me to start my leak test tomorrow morning and apply the Redgard the rest of the way up tomorrow evening, and I could optionally start putting some on the floor around the floor drain if I have time for it. But the real priority is being ready for the plumbing permit leak test on Friday.

24+ hours is a long time to reliably keep the dog away from drinking standing water though, I'm worried he'll find a way to bust in and drink some. His favorite water is anything that's not in his water bowl.
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Old 10-19-2017, 09:02 AM   #44
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Last night I put another coat on all the joints in the Redgard area, coated primer on the floor with the floor heat cable and any surrounding area that the SLC was likely to overflow, went to HD to get more Redgard to be applied this evening, and poured the SLC. This morning I filled the shower pan with water to start the 24 hour leak test so it would be ready for the inspection tomorrow.

I put a large picture across the doorway supported by the toilet bowl that will be installed after tile so I could keep curious 4-legged visitors from leaving paw prints or lowering the water level. The cat was considering jumping over to investigate last night while the SLC was wet, fortunately it looks like she made the right choice to go back to just laying around on the couch.
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Old 10-19-2017, 09:29 AM   #45
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got an update from my wife, so about 3 hours later it's gone down around a 1/4"... She says its dripping into the basement so there must be a pinhole somewhere in the redgard.
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