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Old 01-15-2015, 04:19 PM   #16
t2jeff
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What is the drawback to using thinset to fill the affordance?

Switching topics to flooring, my next question would be if I plan on hardibacker on the floor, is it common to place hardi under the footprint of the tub to keep the elevation the same pre-tile?
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Old 01-15-2015, 05:16 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff
What is the drawback to using thinset to fill the affordance?
Not sure just what affordance miight mean in that context, Jeff.

Dealer's choice. Run the CBU under the tub if you wanna.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 01-15-2015, 05:26 PM   #18
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The Schluter Shower Handbook does not want drywall mud (the stuff in the bucket) on the wall before you apply the thinset and membrane. That stuff will soften from the moisture in the thinset, potentially sucking more out than desired, and affecting the bond. IMHO, a setting type of mud works as does covering it with a primer. Call them for their official recommendation. Best to not use it at all. As to the tapers, it's easier to keep things flat if you prefill them with thinset...no tape required. The Kerdi fabric is FAR stronger than the mesh tape, so it will reinforce that joint better. Unlike a typical drywall joint where it often ends up with a slight hump at the seam (especially true with end butt joints), you do not want any hump there, and not prefilling is probably the easiest way. If your thinset consistency is proper and you are careful, you can keep that flat in one step while applying the thinset and then embedding (something like a drywall blade that easily is longer than the combined tapers would keep that area flat.

Now, if you use KerdiBoard, the edges aren't tapered like drywall, and a coat of thinset underneath, then embed the Kerdiband ends up with nearly no discernable buildup on the joints or over the fasteners (with the large washers, it dimples the surface so they end up flush).
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Old 01-16-2015, 11:24 AM   #19
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@CX.......affordance meant are there drawbacks to using thinset to fill in the low areas on the drywall board.
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Old 01-16-2015, 08:59 PM   #20
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Ok, next round of questions:

1. If I go the Kerdi route, is it necessary to block behind drywall butt joints to prevent deflection/movement or is this overkill. I would also block at the bottom where the drywall ends by the tub flange.

2. If I go the Kerdi route and desire a niche, it it easy enough to frame, drywall, and kerdi it, or is waterproofing the corners difficult enough to buy an off the shelf niche?

3. If I go the hardi and poly sheet route, do the required amount of screws for hardi attachment really make the poly waterproof or is it just water resistant at that point?

Thanks everyone!
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Old 01-16-2015, 09:25 PM   #21
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1. Not required, but you can do that if you like. I think the blocking at the top of the tub is a good idea.

2. I make all my niches that way.

3. It doesn't qualify as waterproof, but it's a sufficient moisture barrier to last many decades. If you're planning a niche, I'd elect to go the direct bonded waterproof membrane method instead.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 01-16-2015, 09:30 PM   #22
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Jeff, I do just the opposite on niches. I've found it much easier to just put the box in and bring the waterproofing over the flanges. Saves time, and no annoying overlap buildups to deal with.

If I wanted a custom size, that would be a different story.
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Old 01-16-2015, 09:56 PM   #23
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Well, I like to do lots of things, but creating extra work is not one of them. I will probably block by the flange, but if it's not a "normal" or required step to decrease deflection or eliminate potential cracking, I will skip it.

As I get closer to finalizing the design, I will revisit the out of the box vs. custom niche option. Thank you for the input.
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Old 01-16-2015, 10:09 PM   #24
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If you'll look under Kerdi in our whirl-famous Liberry you'll find a nifty template our friend Joe Gleason made for rectangular niches. Might simplify things for you just a bit.

Don't be misled by the change in direction of cuts from one end to the other. He just did that to confuse folks and I can't get him to change it.
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Old 01-21-2015, 04:01 PM   #25
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Hey guys, just wanted to hop in here as I saw Harp's comment. ProPanel is most definitely not coated with HydroBan. We use a proprietary cement coating and manufacture all of our own niches and pans right here in the U.S. of A.
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Old 01-21-2015, 04:41 PM   #26
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Thanks for the clarification, Ryan.

It didn't sound right to me, but I've never seen the product and couldn't really comment.
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Old 11-15-2015, 11:57 AM   #27
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DCOF Rating for bathroom tile

I need some professional advice for some mosaic tile I would like to use for my bathroom remodel.

The DCOF rating in the lower right (the icon shows a little guy falling) shows "DCOF<.42".

Is this suitable for a residential bathroom?

Thanks in advance,
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Old 11-15-2015, 01:56 PM   #28
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Jeff, the Coefficient of friction of a tile surface, however measured, is but one of many properties of ceramic tiles specified under ANSI A137.1. The suitability of any such tile for use in any particular installation is up to the specifier or final user.

The minimum requirement of 0.42 DCOF is for "Level interior spaces expected to be walked upon when wet." If you think that fits your application and if you think that rating is sufficient to your purpose, use it.

Keep in mind that there are so many variables associated with the risk of a slip occurring that the DCOF of the tile surface is but one consideration.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 11-15-2015, 07:18 PM   #29
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That's kinda my question. I have no idea if that rating is sufficient for my application. As a DIYer, I never knew anything about DCOF until picking out this mosaic. I wasn't sure if I needed more than .42 or less than .42. The labeling on the box was confusing to me.

Let me ask ask it another way. Are there certain types of mosaic tile (in this case, 2" squares) that I should select or stay away from due to slippage concerns?

Jeff
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Old 11-15-2015, 07:47 PM   #30
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Smaller tiles with more grout lines generally provide a more slip-resistant surface and why we always recommend them for shower floors, for example.

All ceramic tiles are slippery when wet. Some are more slippery than others. The only ones I'm aware of that are specifically manufactured to have a "non-slip" surface are not particularly attractive and not at all easy to clean and maintain.

How wet will your floor be? With what will it be wetted? Who will be walking on it? In what footwear? will a mat of some kind be used on the floor when wet? How safe do you wanna be? Etc, etc.

Again, up to you to select what you need for your application. The DCOF of .42 is the minimum requirement according to ceramic tile standards for the application I posted above.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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