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Old 06-27-2008, 08:46 AM   #1
Dnutt
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Should I Start Over???

Ok, I did just enough research to get me in trouble. I chose to gut our bathroom and shower for my first remodeling project. I replaced the shower walls, lid and subfloor with 1/2" osb. I tried pouring my pre-slope (before I found this site), with megabond and latex additive. It was a complete mess so I ran outside and mixed some up that was like damp dirt so I could spread it. I didn't use the metal lath and wasn't completely satisfied with it but I thought I could do a better job with the second layer. I got the liner down and found this site. My qestions are, do I take up the liner and preslope and start over with lath and deck mud or just go with it? Several other problems I'm going to run into.. What to do about the folded liner corners over the osb, do I need a vapor barrier and how to put up the hardibacker if I need a vapor barrier? Help Please!
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Old 06-27-2008, 08:54 AM   #2
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Welcome to the forum, Dnutt. Is there something else we can call you?

Thinset like Megabond is designed to be applied at a thickness no greater than 1/4". I would tear out what you have and start over.

If I understand you correctly, you have oriented strand board (OSB) on the walls and ceiling? That isn't necessary, and could be bad. Use cement board (or drywall if you use the Kerdi system).

Before you go any further, you should read the shower construction thread in the Liberry.

Now that you have your own thread started, come right back here with any additional questions.
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Old 06-27-2008, 08:57 AM   #3
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If your preslope is pitched right, I think you'll be okay. It may crack since it isn't reinforced, so you might need to reinforce the final mud bed. Personally, I'd rather rip it out and redo it, to avoid that. I'd also rip out the OSB on the walls. Is the floor *only* half inch osb, or is that over another subfloor? If it is the only layer you really need to rip everything out. Putting your hardie over the osb will only make your shower an inch smaller. You don't gain anything, so I'd use the osb to build some lightweight shelves in your garage

I may have just pointed you in three completely different directions, so we'll kick back and see what some others have to say on the matter.

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Old 06-27-2008, 09:07 AM   #4
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thanks for the quick responses. My thinking, (if u can call it that), was that the osb would give me more to screw/adhere the hardibacker to. The floor is 3/4" by the way, my mistake. I would like to leave the osb because the studs weren't in the best of shape,(a little uneven and some were notched to fit the old cast iron shower tub I took out). I have a time and budget limit but I would like to do the best job I can with these crappy circumstances. Thanks again for all the advice and keep it coming!
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Old 06-27-2008, 02:34 PM   #5
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Old 06-27-2008, 02:49 PM   #6
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I think most pros and many backerboard companies would rather you remove the OSB on the walls. If you do leave it there, you need to make sure you waterproof the backerboard. The OSB will trap any moisture that gets through, and it won't be pretty if that happens.

I'd call the preslope fiasco "experience," commit it to memory, and laugh about it later after you've replaced it.
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Old 06-27-2008, 03:18 PM   #7
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You can leave the OSB since you are using a Traditional Pan Liner BUT........You WILL Use a 4 Mil Plastic Seamless vapor barrier completely covering it...........This you will cut leaving it drape to the floor for now.

Next............You Will Use Furring Strips on The walls. 1 x 2's will be fine for this..........You will cut these leaving them 8" short of the floor.

Your Installed Drain will be a 3 piece clamping type drain.

You will do a Preslope using Sand Topping Mix.........

Your Liner will then be installed over your cured Preslope and run up the wall attaching ONLY the top of the liner........YOU WILL FOLD Your Corners.
You will cut out only the exact dimension of the Inside of the drain and carefully cut around the bolt recievers on your drain.......You will add a Bead of Quality urethane or Silicone caulk around the drain Under the membrane, press down and then attach your clamp to the drain.........

The adjustable part of the drain will be set for height when you do your final Mudslope OVER the liner.

You will Install your Hardibacker BEFORE doing your Final Slope being VERY careful not to puncture your liner.
The hardibacker will be a Full 3' height Minimum from the Pan Liner Up and will NOT be attached Below the furring strips so as not to puncture a hole in the liner................The Final Mudbed will LOCK the bottom of your board in place.

Fold your plastic vapor barrier up out of the way when doing your preslope...Once the liner is installed drape it back down Inside the pan liner......Any moisture will go downhill from plastic to pan liner and on to the drain...Nothing can reach the OSB.

This is a Quick overview................to see how to do your curb, read our shower thread in the Library............Have fun.

The OSB Will cut down on some Noise transference for those Wild Shower nights so its not hurting a thing BUT It will have to be furred out to make the liner work
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Old 06-28-2008, 08:19 AM   #8
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Thanks for the advice, this site is great. A couple more questions though. Does the vapor barrier need to cover the ceiling? And I have been reading that you should leave 1/4" gap between the backerboard and motar bed to prevent wicking. If thats not the case should the bottom of the backerboard be sealed with something? This sounds like a good plan but I think it will mess up my shampoo niches. Have to re-think that one. Thanks again!
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Old 06-28-2008, 08:22 AM   #9
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The backerboard stops about 1/4" above the liner, but will be covered by the setting bed. If there is a preslope and the weepholes in the drain fitting are clear, there won't be any wicking in the backeboard.

Frame your niches in wood, wrap with backerboard and cover with a liberal coating of Redgard.
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Old 07-04-2008, 08:54 AM   #10
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Quick question on mortar/

I am getting ready to pour my shower curb and wanted to know what type of mortar works best. I already have some megabond thinset mixed up. Can I use that or add some mortar mix to it or what. I have portland cement, (type 1), regular quickcrete mortar mix, and some quickcrete cement mix. Which would work best for doing my shower curb??
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Old 07-04-2008, 08:56 AM   #11
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Hi Dean,

You can use the "fat mud" (wall mud) recipe, or premixed masons mortar. Basically, you want sand, p cement, and a little lime for stickiness.

Oh ... and no to the thinset.
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Old 07-04-2008, 08:59 AM   #12
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Thanks for the quick reply. So the thinset mortar I already have wouldn't work? I thought maybe mixing it with regular mortar mix might be alright.
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Old 07-04-2008, 09:09 AM   #13
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Hi Dean, you don't want to use thinset to mud the curb, you want wall mud. The mortar mix really needs a little lime mixed with it, maybe a shovel per sack.

Do you have the curb wrapped with lath?

Check the "shower construction info" thread in the liberry. Good reading there.
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Old 07-04-2008, 09:11 AM   #14
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No, don't use the thinset ... totally different applications. The easiest option would to be using pre-packaged "mason's mix". If you have sand, portland cement, and lime, you can also make your own. I use ~ 5:1:1/2.
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Old 07-08-2008, 08:29 AM   #15
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Thinset over mortar bed?

Love this site but it's hard to get any work done when I spend half the day researching questions! Here's the deal. My mortar bed was mixed a little on the dry side so some sand was coming loose in a few spots. I read another post that said I could put a layer of thinset over the mortar bed to create a smooth surface. I did that. Then I read another post that stated that a mortar bed should be pourous so water can reach the weep holes. So did I mess this up by applying thinset? The thinset ended up being thicker than I wanted, about 1/8 thick. Also a question on grout. My wife picked out 12x12 ceramic on walls, 6x6 ceramic with 2x2 slate on the floor. Can I use the same grout for all the tiles? Thanks again, Dean
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