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Old 12-16-2017, 04:36 PM   #76
makethatkerdistick
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I see. That is probably a little more challenging to get right and look good than the ordinary Schluter grate. I am concerned that those tiles would come loose over time with the flexibility of the support structure. Are they attached with thinset?

In hindsight, my thinset consistency for laying tile was perfect. However, when it came to setting tile around the drain, it was almost too fluid working with those small pieces. You might consider mixing up a small stiffer batch for that area so you have more control. How will you place those 2 1/8 x 2 1/8 tiles on the 4x4 grate surface and integrate it with the floor?
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Old 12-16-2017, 05:29 PM   #77
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Quote:
How will you place those 2 1/8 x 2 1/8 tiles on the 4x4 grate surface and integrate it with the floor?
The plan is to do it just like modeled:

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The set of 4 tiles that will be on the cover will be trimmed down to 4" square. The surrounding tile will have a 4 1/2" square opening, cut similar to yours. There's some weird optical illusion going on because that picture above has the cover tiles trimmed down so they are less than 2" square and the surrounding tiles are 2 1/8" square, yet the cover tiles somehow look bigger than the rest.

The Kerdi drain cover is a metal plate with a piece of Kerdi pre-attached to it so the tile just gets thinset in place. I'm a little worried about it holding but I figure that if it fails I can try other methods. Worse case scenario is that I ditch the idea of trying to match the mosaic and just cut a piece of field tile to 4" x 4" and use that.
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Old 12-16-2017, 11:34 PM   #78
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As I am awaiting the delivery of my Schluter profiles and getting ready for wall tile, I have a question:

Between my shower floor tile and the walls there is a 3/8 in wide and about 3/8 in deep gap. I left it on purpose to accomplish my intended floor tile layout.
The gap will be perfectly covered up/overlapped by my wall tile. However, do you experts think I should fill this in with something prior to doing wall tile or not worry about it? My fear is water might somehow pool in there if there ever were a small leak in the silicone that's going to protect the perimeter where walls and floor meet.

Leave it empty or fill it in with something?
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Old 12-17-2017, 12:24 AM   #79
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Leave it empty. There's nothing to be gained by filling it. If the floor is properly sloped that water will make it's way to the drain.

Those tile-in drains look cool. They lift out easily if needed for cleaning. What I don't like about them is that they don't allow for lateral adjustment like the standard drain. I've put one of them in, and the drain couldn't be centered because of a floor joist, so you notice the cuts on either side aren't even.

I was afraid it wouldn't drain properly with just those little open grout joints on each side, but it worked.

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Old 12-17-2017, 10:10 AM   #80
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About that modified thinset and Kerdi

Out of curiosity, I put a remnant of my Flexbond thinset into an airtight food storage container. Little headroom so no air to dry the polymers! And guess what. After 48 hours it was rock hard despite the full presence of moisture. Is the drying issue mostly a problem with latex-modified thinsets?

Anyway, I am less concerned about modified drying issues now.

Kman: Thanks, I am now not concerned about this gap anymore. Like you, I don't like that the tileable grate can't be adjusted during installation. The adjustment was critical for my layout/tile setting process.
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Old 12-17-2017, 05:19 PM   #81
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On the upside, my 12x24 floor tile is all done. Here's the vanity area adjacent to the bathroom. I built the vanity from 3/4 in stock from scratch to exactly fit the area. I was afraid of lippage but thankfully tried a leveling system which made it easier. I found the Rubi system at my Floor & Decor. It's not my favorite but it does work.

I got bored as the Schluter profiles still aren't here. Thus, I tackled my shampoo bottle niche back wall. We saw this beautiful dark brown honed marble and thought it'd do. I integrated a diamond pattern of four floor tiles into the wall. I was surprised how nicely the marble cuts on the wet saw.
As you can see, the anti-lippage squad aided my installation. It's the cheap QEP leveling system from Home Depot. I kind of like it. It does work.
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Old 12-17-2017, 05:27 PM   #82
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Looks great.
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Old 12-18-2017, 12:36 AM   #83
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Two question for the Schluter profile experts:

1.) When installing Schiene and Rondec, the stainless steel version doesn't have the spacer for the grout joint. I was thinking of just cleanly abutting my tile to the profile without a grout joint.
However, I've read somewhere that this might lead to a small space where mold growth could happen.

Am I better off leaving space for a grout joint to avoid mold in those areas?

2.) I will not be able to put all of my wall tile up at once. However, I need to install all of my profile at that point, run them up the wall and embed them. I was thinking of using something sticky like Flexbond and removing all excess mortar around and on top of my profile to set it in place until I get around to tiling it. Obviously, I will make sure that the profile's triangles are filled with mortar.

Is this a decent approach when tiling all spaces at once isn't possible right away?
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Old 12-21-2017, 11:37 AM   #84
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Just sharing this for future reference (in case anyone was wondering):

I got all my stainless profiles, the Deco DE and the Rondec. They're beautiful to say the least.

Wanting to get as much info as possible on how to handle these profiles, I called up Schluter. The first-line customer representative was a former tile setter with comprehensive knowledge of how to handle stainless steel profiles. Impressive, to say the least! Never had such great customer service on the phone!

I caused extra work for myself when I got the stainless profiles. I kind of knew it. The rep. confirmed that small grout lines around profiles are utterly advisable to avoid dirt getting trapped and avoid possible mold growth. One has to work with external spacers as these profiles don't have the built-in space-keeping line.

Cutting the stainless is tricky. I don't have the money to purchase a variable-speed angle grinder and a non-ferrous cutting disk (which is the premium solution).

I ended up doing the following: I marked the profiles with a Sharpie on the back for my 45 deg. miter cuts, then started cutting a groove with my Diabolo diamond blade mounted on my el-cheapo angle grinder. I discolored the stainless by doing so but since it was on the back, nobody will ever see it. Once the groove was set in place, I finished the job with my hacksaw equipped with a very fine-toothed metal blade. This gave me a great cut as the groove would guide my hacksaw and avoid slippage on the steel. However, stainless is tough to saw manually. I finished the pieces off by filing the sharp corners.

Now, the good thing about stainless is that it polishes very nicely and can be finished and refinished if necessary. No anodized layer to damage!

Schluter also makes a particular stainless for extremely harsh conditions (such as for submerged application in chlorinated water as found in swimming pools). I thought, however, that was somewhat overkill for my application.

Did I already say I love the look and finish of the stainless?
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Old 12-22-2017, 11:07 PM   #85
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I have good news and bad news. I completed my main wall and it turned out nicely. I like the mix of mostly polished ceramic for ease of use and cleaning and a nice marble accent farther up for some character. I also finished the niche with the stainless steel Rondec and porcelain tile for the niche's side walls (actually it's from the floor tile). This will ensure that I can easily clean my niche's bottom when soap will build up. I avoided using the marble on horizontal surfaces out of fear of staining down the road.

Now the bad news: I dropped one of the 3x9 marble tiles onto my floor and chipped two floor tiles. I am so very sad about this.

Should I 1.) chalk it up as an error and get used to the chips OR
2.) carefully try to take those two offender out and replace them?

I kind of want to replace them. However, they've been flexbonded to the Kerdi membrane for two weeks now, thus mostly cured. Please help me out: What is a good strategy to get them out without damaging the Kerdi? Perhaps grind away from the top with an oscillating tool/diamond drilll bit, slowly pulverizing them? Or busting them out? What do the professionals do in such a case? As a reminder, this is 2x2 porcelain mosaic tile installed on a fiberglass mat over Kerdi with highly modified thinset mortar.

Thanks for your great help as always!
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Old 12-23-2017, 07:39 AM   #86
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If it were me (which Im glad its not), after I finished crying and yelling; Id cut the tiles almost all the way through in a waffle pattern. Probably something like 1/4 squares, being very careful not to get into the thinset or the adjacent tiles. Then use a small chisel or drift punch to pop out the little pieces. If you can scrape out almost all of thinset you would probably be able to use thinset to get the new tiles back in. Epoxy could be another option and would mean less thinset to remove. My main concern at this stage would be to avoid even seeing any orange in the base for fear of creating an unseen nick in the waterproofing and having a headache years down the road.
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Old 12-23-2017, 07:46 AM   #87
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They're not grouted, which is good. I'd use a nail set and hammer to break them up. You're doing somewhat delicate work here, so no "bashing". Just the minimum amount of force it takes to break the tile into small pieces for removal. Think "dental surgery".
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Old 12-23-2017, 08:00 AM   #88
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Sorry about your floor. Hope it works out.

But really nice wall. I keep thinking that I'm doing all this work that I should go ahead and do something a bit more extravagant like that but then the "boss" says "No! Just get it done!".
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Old 12-23-2017, 09:06 AM   #89
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Yep, what the others said. Then, lay cardboard on the tile floor to protect it while you're working.
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Old 12-23-2017, 12:27 PM   #90
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Thanks, guys. Good suggestions. I suppose I will get one of those small cutting tools (dremel style or oscillating) and do the wafer cuts, then try to break those out with a chisel. Another layer of safety is the fiberglass mat. Once I see that I know I am between thinset and tile.

I was also thinking of grinding the new tiles a little bit thinner from the back to gain a little more space.

And yes, I should have put down cardboard or something. Typical first-timer mistake, I guess.
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