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Old 03-02-2018, 08:03 PM   #1
Pamraye
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bathroom remodel

Hi, I have really enjoyed reading this forum and feel like I have learned some important things! But, I still have a lot to learn so thought I would register and ask the experts.

We want to change the tile on our bathroom floor. This house was built spec'ed for a ceramic tile bathroom floor, so the floor trusses were engineered to carry that load (minimally I suspect), though I can't find the paperwork saying exactly what the deflection rating is. They are open web floor trusses, 18" tall, 24"oc. They span 15'. The subfloor is 3/4" Advantech (or maybe it is called 23/32?), with a 3/8" CBU. The floor we currently have in that room is 12x12 porcelain tile. It has not cracked and no grout has cracked at all, we are just tired of the color and would like a heated floor.

I am interested in installing 12x24" ceramic on Ditraheat and I see in their installation guide that for 24" oc trusses, they advise a double layer wood subfloor/underlayment, minimum 3/4" or 23/32" subfloor, with minimum 3/8" or 11/32" wood underlayment on top of the subfloor.

I would prefer to stay with the 11/32" or 3/8" panel because even that will be taller than adjacent flooring by 1/4" after the Ditra is installed (right? I"m not great at math).

My questions:
1. I'm not sure Advantech makes an 11/32" panel, but if they do, would it be worth the extra money to use the Advantech panel as the underlayment under the Ditra, rather than plain OSB? My interest is the superior stiffness and water resistance of the Advantech over plain OSB.

2. If Advantech doesn't make an 11/32" panel, do you know of a stiff, water resistant panel that is offered at that or 3/8" size? I'm not very familiar with plywoods.

3. Is it ok to put plywood on top of the Advantech for an underlayment?

Thank you for your time and talents!
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Old 03-03-2018, 09:56 AM   #2
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Hi Pam. Welcome.

Yes, it's fine to put plywood over Avantec, but 1/2 in. (15/32) is a lot better than 3/8. 3/8 will work, though.

I have done bath floors with Ditra over single-layer 3/4 plywood on 24 in. centers without problem, and Aventec, I think, is rated the same or better than plywood. Double wood is always better, though.
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Old 03-03-2018, 10:18 AM   #3
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I would caution you about getting a water-resistant plywood underlayment when you are planning on using Ditra. If only the glue used to fabricate the panel is water resistant, that's usually not a problem. But if there's a water resistant coating of some sort, it will actually interfere with the bond between Ditra and plywood .
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Old 03-03-2018, 09:48 PM   #4
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bathroom remodel

Thank you both for the advice! So it sounds like a water-resistant panel is a bad idea as an underlayment for Ditra... I'm glad I asked, the bond issue would not have occurred to me. I figured anything water resistant would be best in a bathroom. So I see that Schluter recommends "Exposure 1" panels, which I guess have a "moisture-resistant bond"... but I should probably not choose Exterior grade panels, which must have too much moisture-resistant coating? Also I think I've seen on the forum to use BC grade?
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Old 03-07-2018, 07:04 PM   #5
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Hi again,

I've been reading some good things about flexcolor cq grout. Am I right that it is an acrylic grout? Something that I wonder-- if it is not advised to use an acrylic caulk in the shower (I always see 100% silicone caulk recommended), why does an acrylic grout do so well in showers?
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Old 03-07-2018, 07:16 PM   #6
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bathroom remodel

I think many in this forum would advise to not use premixed grout in general. Might do some searching or wait and see what others say.

Silicone grout in changes of plain such as a corner.
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Old 03-09-2018, 06:33 PM   #7
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I am surprised by that,I felt that I was reading a lot of positive feedback on the flexcolor cq thread.

Here's another wacky question... I am considering a semi vitreous glazed ceramic for the shower walls. I know semi vitreous is ok in shower walls, but I'd read a little about absorbent tiles (mostly stone I think, but at least one ceramic) darkening with heavy absorption after showers (the first row of tile above the pan), so I soaked one of the tiles in water for 24 hours just to make sure it wouldn't darken or have a persistent "waterline". Well the darker color of the saturated body does not show through the glaze, but, the tile is still damp after drying in the open air of a conditioned room for 10 hours. Plus the ambient humidity here today is only 20%…Does that seem odd? I realize that my experiment doesn't equal the water exposure in a shower, but I've heard that the bottom row of tile does sometimes sit in a little standing water at the pan deck junction, possibly wicking that water up into the clay body. Also it sounds from my reading like grout soaks up water and holds it against the edge of the tile maybe? So I'm concerned that in the very low air circulation of a wediboard shower, the tiles that got wet would stay wet forever. Btw, I'm planning to use a solid surface Onyx Collection shower pan.

So my question is, should I avoid using this tile as a shower wall since it holds onto moisture for so long even when fully exposed to air circulation?

Thank you for your wisdom!
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:17 AM   #8
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Hi, I thought I would give my thread a bump and see what you guys thouht of my last question. Thank you!
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Old 03-26-2018, 08:53 AM   #9
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Drop in tub deck

Hi all! We will also be replacing the tile on the tub deck around our drop in jetted tub. The tub lip rested on top of the old tile, and we would like to install the new tile underneath the tub lip also. However, the new tile is thicker than the old, so the new tile and thinset won't slide under the lip. The tub is supported underneath by expanding foam. Is there any way to raise the tub an eighth to quarter inch without completely tearing it and/or the deck framing out? Thank you!
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Old 03-26-2018, 11:52 AM   #10
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Regarding post #6, lots of people here have had success using Flexcolor CQ.....

You can get color matched silicone to use in all changes of plane right here....
http://colorriteinc.com/.
You're looking for the "color sil" product. You can order sanded or sanded silicone to match you grout choice!

Good luck!
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Old 04-06-2018, 02:21 PM   #11
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Hi everyone!

I'm trying to plan ahead for the glass door and panel that we will be installing on our shower. This is a remodel, so we already have the door and fixed panel. The fixed panel will be installed in a framed opening in a wall, just like a window; so, completely surrounded by framing. We will be waterproofing the whole shower including this window-like opening (which is an interior wall so not really a window) with GoBoard and sealant.

I've seen some discussion on the forum about installing a fixed panel with silicone only. I saw a couple experts talk about tiling "up to" the glass on both sides of the glass, so you are "capturing the glass" between the tiles, then a bead of silicone all around the panel. When you do this, do you put the glass on the GoBoard (or whatever substrate you are using)? Or do you put it on top of the thinset? It looks like you use little clear plastic spacers of some kind to hold the glass away from the hard surface? Do I have the idea right in the drawing I attached? Thank you!
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Old 04-15-2018, 10:11 PM   #12
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Pam, I have frequently installed fixed glass panels in shower walls as you show in your drawing. Only difference would be that I would have a waterproof membrane directly under the plastic spacers where you have Go-Board. I know of that product, but have never used it and am not familiar with it's properties.

Actually, I now see that you have thinset mortar under the glass panel and I would not do that. I generally set the tiles on one side of the glass, set the glass, then set the tiles on the other side.

You still need to ensure that the waterproof layer of the bottom sill slopes properly to the drain.

My opinion; worth price charged.
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Old 05-03-2018, 05:00 PM   #13
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Thanks for the reminder about sloping the bottom sill, we will do that!

I am considering using Adex Nature tile, it is a ceramic tile with a matte crackle glaze. I've read about some difficulty with cutting and grouting crackle glaze tiles, but I can't tell if that is just GLASS crackle tiles, or if ceramics with a crackle glaze are also difficult for a newbie.

I've read about covering the cut line with superglue prior to using the wet saw. I've also read about sealing the tile prior to grouting. Would those steps be necessary with this adex tile? We will not be using it in a shower, just a backsplash.

Thank you for all your help!
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Old 05-09-2018, 02:26 PM   #14
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Wanted to bump my thread, see if you all had some input on my last question? Thank you!
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