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Old 07-30-2010, 10:25 AM   #16
gworrel
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Jaz,

I have a friend who I play volleyball with who grew up in Brightmoor. When we first started playing volleyball about 30 years ago, his team was called the Brightmorons. We still play in the winter at the Crowell rec center on Lahser just South of 6 mile Rd. Small world.

Greg
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Old 08-10-2010, 12:58 PM   #17
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Decided to take up the subfloor and start over. New joists will be sistered to the existing joists to stiffen and correct to level. I bought some PL construction adhesive and 2.5" spax screws.

We plan to put one layer of 3/4 inch plywood then ditra then porcelain tile. I sent a helper up to get plywood and they sold him 3/4" Sturdifloor. I told him B/C sanded T&G but they only had Sturdifloor and Dryply in T&G. Is sturdifloor what we want? Or should we take it back and get B/C non-T&G? Thanks.

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Old 08-10-2010, 02:30 PM   #18
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The 3/4" SturdiFloor oughta be ok, but for confirmation, whyn't post a quick photo of the stamp on a sheet?
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Old 08-11-2010, 09:51 AM   #19
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Here is a stamp on one of the boards. It was the only one I had easy access to so I hope it is clear enough. It does say sanded but apparently this type of plywood is not letter graded?



Also, is there a trick to getting joists that are straight? We bought some last week and I wasn't there when they were purchased and they may have warped since then but none of them look straight enough to use. I haven't done much rough carpentry. Thanks.

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Old 08-11-2010, 11:30 AM   #20
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You got the right flooring there for ceramic tile, yep.

Not sure about the joist issue other'n maybe shopping at a different store? Or mebbe snap a chalkline on 'em and rip the offending high spots off? I'd wanna wait til they was screwed in place tho before doing that. Big tolerances one gets used to for rough work, but it sure is a lot easier when the stock is straight and true to begin with...
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Old 08-30-2010, 10:03 AM   #21
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Ok, made some progress. We have put in 5 of 8 leveled sister joists. I have a question about putting a joist along the exterior sill plate where there is no joist. Here is a picture of what I am talking about:



We cut the floor out flush to the wall with a toe-kick saw. The old floor was supported by the exterior rim joist which is not accessible. I need to shim the new joist that will sit on top of the sill plate to bring it up level to the new joists. I was thinking I would cut blocking pieces to meet the next joist to the right in the picture then glue and screw it all together then insert it as a unit which I can then shim to the proper level and glue it to the sill plate. I could also use long screws through the sistered joists into the blocking. Can I just use cedar shims? Is there some other preferable method? Thanks.

Another quick question: After gluing and screwing a sistered joist, is it ok to walk on the freshly glued joist to work on the next one? If not, how long should we wait?

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Old 08-30-2010, 11:04 AM   #22
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The joists are supported by the sill plates, but you need to shim, and you want to use cedar shims, correct? I'd say yes to that. Apply glue to the shims and tack them in place with a nail or staple to keep them from sliding.

The rim joist keeps the floor joists from falling over or twisting. Blocking between the joists will do the same thing. I think that's what you were asking.

You can walk on a freshly-glued sistered joist after you get the screws in place.
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:55 AM   #23
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I am not sure if I made the question clear. In the photo, the far left joist is just sitting there on top of the sill plate, unattached. To the left is an outside wall which runs parallel to the joists. I have rigid foam glued to the rim joist to the left of the new joist.

I have to secure the joist to something to provide support for the new plywood subfloor. There is no joist to sister it to. Just sitting on the sill plate leaves it too low. So the question is how to secure this joist at the right level with the rest of the new joists.


You answer may be the same. Use cedar shims and glue them in place and use blocking to tie it to the nearest joist.

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Old 08-30-2010, 12:00 PM   #24
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Yep, same answer.
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Old 08-31-2010, 11:51 AM   #25
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Mebbe I'm the one misunderstanding, but is it possible to attach the new joist where it can be securely set, and then sister another one onto it, at the proper height? Or does that have adverse impacts to the space below?
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Old 08-31-2010, 04:44 PM   #26
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Ed,

Your question made me realize I was leaving out a critical fact. There is a heating duct (huge old gravity furnace duct) that prevents running a joist all the way from the center beam to the outer wall. The first joist which runs parallel to the wall and is about a foot away from the wall is notched several inches. At the sill plate, the duct leaves essentially no room for a joist.

I think what I need to do is use a short block piece from the first sistered joist over to the rim joist then attach the new joist to that and shim it at the outer sill at the other end. Since it will be running directly over the sill plate I can add additional shims for extra support along the length. I hope this makes sense.

It appears to me that the outer wall was supported by the subfloor which we cut just inside of the wall. While it is still supported by the rim joist, should I add additional support under this short stub of floor under the wall?

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Old 08-31-2010, 09:02 PM   #27
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Seems you could work both items in together even - get that wall supported better, plus give yourself ample blocking to tack on that new joist at the (eventual) proper elevation.

QUite the project you've got there, from the looks... tough angles, lotsa loadbearing stuffs... good luck with it!
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Old 07-28-2011, 02:10 PM   #28
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Ok, I am back on this project and moving to the next step. The floor framing and plywood subfloor are done.

Now I am putting an interior non-load bearing wall that will divide the bathroom from a bedroom. The wall will be the main plumbing wall with the shower, vanity, and toilet all on this wall. I will be using 2x6 lumber. The wall needs to be flush with an existing chimney that goes up through the room at one corner. The chimney is brick but has plaster over it.

One end of the glass enclosed tiled shower (2 glass walls and two tiled walls) will be on this wall. So when you are in the shower facing the shower head, the chimney will be behind the first 16 inches of tile on the wall you are facing. I have a hanging mount shower fixture, so only mounting brackets will mount on the wall, and the water supply can come through the framed wall.

My plan is to build the wall to within 2 inches of the chimney, then fasten drywall that spans from the 2x6 framing to the chimney in the corner. So I would need to fasten the drywall directly to the chimney. I would use the Schluter Kerdi over the drywall with tile over that. Can I use tapcon screws to fasten the drywall to the chimney? The chimney is not square with the existing wall to the right, being slightly greater than 90 degrees, so we will make the new framing flush with the right side of the chimney making the new wall exactly square with a slight gap between the drywall and the chimney as it moves away from the corner. So tapcon screws will go along the right edge of the drywall into the chimney, then drywall screws into the first stud which will be about a 20" span. 5/8" drywall should be stiff enough to cover that span.

The sketchup drawing is not accurate in all details, but it shows the location of the chimney and the shower. The shower fittings will be on the same wall as the chimney. The two walls inside the shower will be tiled. Thanks for any help.

Greg
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Old 07-28-2011, 02:53 PM   #29
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Yes, you can use tapcons to secure the drywall to the chimney. Use short ones so as not to penetrate the flue. Besides, they're easier.
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Old 03-24-2012, 10:13 AM   #30
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Rough plumbing going in

I am working with a plumber and I have a few questions. I have an acrylic tile shower base that is going in with tiled walls on two sides, glass enclosure on the other two sides. Does the base go in directly on the subfloor? Is Kerdi Ditra needed under the acrylic base? Should the base go in before the floor and wall tile? There is no drywall on one of the shower walls yet. It is the wall that will be behind the toilet, vanity, and one side of the shower. I am just trying to understand the order of events for plumbing rough in. Thanks
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